Gary W

1937 Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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I would love to see this kind of detailed pictures for a 1920's Buick restoration which is more my vintage, but barring that, this is a great thread with excellent information.  Thanks for posting the progress, it is fascinating and inspiring!

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Painted the block tonight. I carefully covered all the block openings with blue painter's tape.   It's amazing how nice it looks when everything is the same color.  2 coats???

So now I have to paint all the engine accessories to get ready for the final build. 

My plan going forward is to restore the master cylinder and do a complete brake job.  Then replace all four chassis springs.  After that, a nice coat of chassis black (POR-15).  

Then I'd like to install the engine back in the chassis as I feel it's a lot safer there.  

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Put a second coat on the block, and painted the intake manifold, thermostat housing and water outlet all Buick engine green.  

Used POR-15 High temp manifold paint to paint the exhaust manifold and the heat riser in Cast Iron Grey

Then POR-15 Gloss Black to paint the breather and the main leaf of the new rear springs.  (The other leaves are being powder coated...I didn't want to get any of the sand from blasting or the powder in the threaded bushing)

 

Then it was time to move back to the chassis and remove all the brake lines, blocks, clips, hoses, .....  Next post!!

 

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I ordered a full set of pre-bent stainless steel brake lines to replace the 80-year old lines on the car.  It was a job getting all the original equipment off the car, but I tried to do the job methodically and photographed every step from before I touched anything, to every step along the way so I have full documentation when the new lines come in.  Hopefully they fit easily.  

 

The steps I took to completely remove the brake lines, master cylinder, pedals..

1. Photograph and document every line, its origin and insertion and how it passes through the chassis

2. Remove the main line (the one that exits the master cylinder) from the brass block on the chassis 

3. Remove the main line from the master cylinder, being sure to have a bucket ready to catch the brake fluid

4. Remove cotter key and washer from brake pedal.

5. Remove two 9/16 bolts to free the master cylinder from the frame and slide it off the brake pedal as a unit.

6. Remove the remaining three brake lines from the brass block.

7. Remove the brake light switch, slide off the retaining clip and remove the brass block

8. Remove the intermediary brake line from the chassis mounting clip, freeing it from the rear rubber brake hose

9.  Separate that hose from the brake line that runs down the driveshaft

10. Open the driveshaft clips, and remove the driveshaft brake line from the rear (differential mounted) brass block. 

11. Remove the rear wheel brake lines from the brass block, and loosen them from the wheel cylinders.  Remove.

12. Remove the differential mounted brass block.

13. Move to the front of the car, and by holding the hose stationary with  a wrench, remove the brake lines from the hoses

14. Remove the retaining clip, unscrew the hose from the backing plate, repeat for other front wheel

15. Label all hoses, and mark them origin and insertion so when the new lines arrive, it'll help get everything sorted properly.

 

The liquid you see in the photos is PB Blaster....80 years doesn't give up so easy!  But I didn't want to twist any lines in case I have to reuse any.

 

 

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I removed the entire exhaust system (exhaust pipe, muffler, tail pipe and all those clamps and hangers)  All my hangers are completely dry-rotted and all my clamps are rusted to the point where they are not usable.  I ordered a new exhaust system from Waldron's Exhaust.  I'll let you know how it fits!  

Then I removed the rear stabilizer bar and the rear shock links so I can restore them and paint them.

Moved to the front to remove the front stabilizer bar, so I can restore the links and replace the rubber under the clamps.

After that I removed the drag link from the center tie rod so I can clean all that grease and rebuild it.  

Will make it a lot easier to paint the frame now that the brake lines, muffler, stabilizers.... are out.

The springs are going to be replaced next.

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Spent the day wire-wheeling a bucket of nuts, bolts, lock washers, and... the drag link, master cylinder, the brake and clutch pedal, stabilizer connections.....  

Then cleaned them with acetone and sprayed them gloss black.  Have to spray them in small batches, too cold outside so quick spray and immediately back into the garage.

 

AMAZING how nice the parts look just using the wire wheel!  

 

 

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You really should get the proper sizes of "flarenut" wrenches.  You will be able to install your new lines easier and they wont be marred because thes wrenches can't/don't/won't slip.  Also easier on the knuckles.

By the way looking good.

Edited by Tinindian
photo (see edit history)

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What a great thread!  Not only is Gary's work meticulous, but so is his construction of the thread, which enables us all to watch and learn as the project unfolds.  And, as he says, he's having a BLAST!  Thank you.  I'm hooked on this now like a serialized novel -- I can't wait for the next installment.

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Yes, I agree with Tinindian......  flare nut wrenches are a must.  Also i noticed that some of the cotter pins were not factory installed. Be careful when you put back together, do not follow what is on the car now.  Great work on documenting everything. 

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Restored the starter.  Disassembled it last night, wire wheeled the parts I could, scrubbed the rest in paint thinner and cleaned with sandpaper, then a final wash with acetone.  Sprayed the parts and let everything dry overnight.  After work today I re-assembled everything and I am very happy results.  

Then I pushed the chassis outside and using four gallons of paint thinner, I washed the frame down, scrubbed it with a wire grill brush, then a final wash with towels and acetone.  Tomorrow I start painting the frame, restore the master cylinder and start getting the new brake lines installed.  The new brake lines were delivered today.  I think most of the "pre-bent" lines should work, but the "driveshaft" line is never going  to fit so I may have to use my original brake line there.  I'll let you know how I make out.    Some starter before and after photos:

 

 

 


 

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Gary, you can get a new solenoid boot from Bobs Automobilia...  Excellent job on your project, amazes me on how fast you`re moving along..  Tom

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Painted the frame this morning.  Started in the garage at 5:00 by removing the ground strap and the rear tailpipe hanger.  Then gloved up and started on the driver's side rail.  I used POR-15 semi-gloss black.  It took exactly one quart to the whole job.  Notice I didn't paint the springs or the brake backing plates as I will be installing the new brake lines and the new springs and I'll get those fine details done once everything is back together and all cleaned up.  It came out nice.  If you do it, don't start on the side rail!   Start in the middle and work your way out. Much easier when I did the passengers side from the inside out.  Got finished by 10:00

 

I'll give it 24 hours to dry completely.  I want to rebuild the master cylinder this afternoon, paint the pedals and hopefully start running the new brake lines tomorrow. 

 

 

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This comment is for ILIKECARS53 - please elaborate on just how you know that cotter keys were not factory installed?  Seriously, installing cotter keys is pretty elementary - just how could an individual screw that up?  And the comments on here about how 'clean' this fellow is.  Really, guys?  Not everybody is a slob in their shop.  My Dad restored John Deere 2-Cylinder Tractors for over 50 years and his shop looked like a hospital operating room.  When I was growing up my job was to wash all of the tools in Stanisol (cleaner) and have everything laid out on the bench for the next operation.  I have all of his tools now and they still look brand new.  This fellow is the consummate perfectionist and it shows in his work and the way that he is doing the work.  Looking at the background in his photos I would put money on the fact that his home inside and outside would be what you would find in the pages of Better Homes and Gardens.  I am extremely impressed with the way that he is going about what he is doing with this car.  It will be an award winner when he is finished with it - and justly so.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas  aka  Doo Dah

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Gary is blessed with the place to do this type of work. I still have one side of my garage that is gravel with planks and plywood for a working surface. The side where my 1937 sat on jack stands for 25 years. I like Gary's technique better.

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Disassembly of the Master Cylinder... A guided tour!

1.  Remove the two 9/16 nuts and free the master cylinder from its support base

2.  Loosen the jam nut, hold the shank firm with pliers on the knurled ring, and remove the adjustment clevis

3.  Remove the jam nut

4.  Remove the rubber boot

5.  Remove the retaining ring

6.  Withdraw the plunger parts and the valve from the front of the cylinder

7.  Back to the vise to remove the large 1 1/4" nut and the copper gasket from the rear of the master cylinder

8.  Push your finger in the front to remove the spring mechanism from the rear

9.  Remove the filler cap from the top

10. Give it it's first bath in parts cleaner to remove the heavy crud

11. A fine wire passed through the holes to ensure they are clear

12. A little rust remover introduced into the reservoir with some scrubbing will get the remaining rust blossoms out

13. Using clean solvent, wash it out again and again to be sure it is spotless

14. A final bath in clean acetone, and drying out with paper towels and compressed air.

 

I didn't have to hone the cylinder as it was in very nice shape. No galling or pits.  I did notice the reproduction spring is lighter gauge wire, but it has one extra turn to it.  Any thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

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I FORGOT.......What is the rubber washer for??  (Right in the center of the last photo)  Nothing like that came out of my master cylinder, just wondering where it goes?  Thanks!

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Hi Terry,  Please look at the photo that Gary took just before he is going to start taking part the center link.  There are 2 nuts and cotter pins in the upper portion of the photo, both legs of the the cotter pins are just bent over the top of the nut/bolt.  I do not think that is how the factory installed cotter pins. Thanks Jim

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On the '38, that rubber washer goes over the "nubbin" on the inside of the threaded nut at the end of the master cylinder bore. I'm surt the spring will bo OK

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Hi Gary,  Very nice work.  Regarding the master cylinder.......  when I rebuilt the master cylinder in my 42 Buick the spring was also slightly difference and did not effect the braking.  The rubber washer should slip over the little nipple on the outlet.  Thanks   Jim

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There were several factoried and many different workers who installed cotter pins. I'd doubt that there was a "standard practice" back then. Probably just up to the whim of the installer.

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