alsancle

Classic Era Peerless

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On 4/12/2017 at 6:15 PM, alsancle said:

Neat car.  History is obviously very important!

 

RE: The Purple & Ivory Cabriolet Depicted on Posts No. 19 and 22

 

I have come up with a theory to explain this Peerless, A.J. Thirty years ago there was a sale of ten or more Peerlesses at the Stelford place in Illinois, where the Cord prototype was found. One car, to whom it went I don't know, was one of the twelve 1931 Peerlesses and ten 1932 Peerlesses on my list.* I have it written down as 322 c.i.d./120 h.p./Custom Eight/"Rolling Chassis, body fire during Prohibition Era", but just a few body parts missing/Film footage suggests it may be a 2-Pass. body style: possibly a Cabriolet with r.s./138" w.b./Motor number: 13K 3130/Car serial number: unknown. Maybe Ralph Cartonio bought it, brought it back to life, had reason to list it as a 1932, showed it once (in New Gloucester, Maine), and few have seen it since. If we see it at a show somewhere and the above Motor number turns up, my theory would hold a little more water, but Ralph was a skilled body and paint man and had a lot of 1923-1932 Peerlesses go through his shop.

 

 

* KPAIE

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Image result for peerless cars

Photo: vancouverexpress and conceptcarz

 

1930 Peerless Custom Eight owned by Ele Chesney. Next to the Green Dragon factory race cars and the 4-car prototype fleet of V-12 and V-16 cars in 1931, this is the most written-about and viewed Peerless. The good public relations is partly due to concours and museum showings in Ohio, New Jersey, Florida, and California in the last 40 years; plus it being reproduced as a diecast model by the thousands in 1:18, 1:24, 1:27, 1:32, and 1:40 scale(there was even a limited edition release of a Thomas Kincade "Painter of Light" version) . 

 

 

 

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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My dad and I took this Peerless out for the weekend when Leo gephart had it for sale in perhaps 1978 - very nice car and was pretty unrestored at that time (excepting an amateur repaint - same colors) - interestingly it had wire wheels on it then and very nice tire covers (a well optioned sedan all the way around) but the wheels and hubcaps were pretty marginal, so I am guess the woods were in better shape or ?). 

Image result for peerless cars

Photo: vancouverexpress and conceptcarz

 

1930 Peerless Custom Eight owned by Ele Chesney.

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Great photo...I see it´s just been put up on coachbuild.com. I have not heard of De Ley of Holland before, nor seen these Peerless photos. Almost a convertible victoria look, and the somewhat bulky top-down look reminds me of some of the 1930s German cars. The swoop of the bodys rear half and the trunk design are very unusual. Many other body details are different - but the bumpers, parking lights, and sidemount clamps are consistent with 1930s Peerlesses. I´ve entered De Ley into the Peerless Coachbuilders thread on the Peerless Forum already, company number 45.

 

I looked on the web a lot and couldn´t find a match of the location at first. It somewhat resembles a photo on p. 2 of the latest Peerless Motor Car Club newsletter, The PEERLESS CO-OPERATOR(Summer/Fall 2017) entitled ¨24 ème Salon de l´Automobile - Paris 1930¨. I looked some more, and see by the building details(an exact match) it is the 1930 RAI Amsterdam Autosalon, which seems to have had Minerva, Peerless, Panhard et Levassor, Ford, Opel, and Durant, plus many other exhibitors. Durant was still turning out new models in 1931...till January anyway.

 

Thank you very much, A.J. I´m thinking that if one of these turned up in the Schlumpf or Mahy collections, you might sell your baseball cards to get some cash. Have any Walter Big Train Johnson or Babe Ruth rookie cards? (1907 card with the misspelled name would be a good one)

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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The reason the top is so bulky is that many of the European coachbuilders, and especially Sindelfingen used a double top.  So when you were inside it looked like a hardtop.  Generally padded to such an extent that you can't see the top bows from the outside.

IMG_2676.JPG

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The Germanic look of the top always seemed a bit heavy, but that was the style over there. Glad to see you have it out and about!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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Thanks Ed and A.J., for the talk about the German/Dutch/Austrian leanings in convertible top design. So, you probably both feel that the two cars in the foreground are your kind of Peerless, despite their very likely non-existent-ness in the present day; what with the coachwork, European Salon history, and cabriolet body style. In 1927, Peerless told their dealers that 20% of sales were foreign, so I would be surprised if any of the cars in this Peerless stand went back to the States. I don´t know which models -- but I´m leaning toward the fore cars being Master Eights with 125¨ wheelbases and the big battleship in the back being a Custom Eight with 138¨, like this:

 

Image result for motorbase peerless

image from the British site motorbase.com,

reproduced from original Peerless Motor Car Corporation sales brochure

 

 

P.S. to John_Mereness: I think this is the color scheme someone was trying to replicate in the car you drove mentioned 5 posts up(post # 28), 40 years ago. A.J. wants to hear what it drove like when you and your dad took it out for the weekend. Mike West was going to tell us about a ´32 Master Eight he drove flat out after a boisson with the late motorsport journalist Brock Yates, but he hasn´t yet. 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Quite an eye to spot that as a Weymann. I´m not sure I would have without some text. There is a subtle Weymann look to the rear quarter, though. Do you think they were calling this a closed rear-quarter sedan or a club sedan? I´ll guess it´s a photo from a Bulb Horn or a CCCA Bulletin....where´d you find it? Having gone to the high school next to the CIA headquarters, my image analysis says it´s a 1931 photograph. Maybe the Indianapolis paper covered Weymann America production once in a while.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Jeff,

 

I should have listed the source.  Bad on my part.  It came out of a CCCA bulletin,  I think late 50s or early 60s.  There was no text of any consequence or I would have included it.

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"I´m thinking this is what a Weymann body would look like right out of the shop. Kind of a dull finish and padded look"

 

Not necessarily.  My 1931 Rolls Royce has a Weymann body by HJ Mulliner that is aluminium skinned.  According to paperwork avalible from that time, people were rejecting the padded skin look so they simply metal covered them instead but still used the Weymann system of metal connectors on all the wood frame joints to allow movement without the squeeks.

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I think you could get Zapron in different levels of finish, but it probably would not have the sheen of a painted surface.  As David, some of the Weymann bodies, especially later were finished in Aluminium.

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