GaryP65

Too much gas!

36 posts in this topic

Needle has good taper, no grooves. I need to look at the seat.

 

So in looking at the diagram, it looks like the seat unscrews, correct? Is this the 'collar' mentioned above?

Also, there is a collar that the weights are attached to on the needle. Is this soldered to the needle?

 

i think i will flip the levers but how are the pins attached? Are they just pressed in?

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Are you sure it is a carb problem and not the vacuum tank? If the float in the vacuum tank is bad it will over fill the tank and gas will be sucked into the engine through the vacuum line directly into the engine. Plugging the vent tube on the vacuum tank will do that too.

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On ‎1‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 2:46 PM, GaryP65 said:

Needle has good taper, no grooves. I need to look at the seat.

 

So in looking at the diagram, it looks like the seat unscrews, correct? Is this the 'collar' mentioned above?

Also, there is a collar that the weights are attached to on the needle. Is this soldered to the needle?

 

i think i will flip the levers but how are the pins attached? Are they just pressed in?

You will note that the "valve seat" screws into the bottom of the bowl, unscrew this and put a thin washer or gasket under the seat and screw it back in again; by doing this you have raised the point at which the needle comes into contact with the seat, effectively lowering the fuel level in the bowl.

 

The other option as suggested is to take out the pivot pins for the balance levers and reinsert the levers up side down; you will probably see wear marks on the small ends of the balance levers, this has the effect of lost leverage on the float which consequently allows the float to rise too far and cause flooding, reversing the position of these levers may solve the problem.

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11 hours ago, dwollam said:

Are you sure it is a carb problem and not the vacuum tank? If the float in the vacuum tank is bad it will over fill the tank and gas will be sucked into the engine through the vacuum line directly into the engine. Plugging the vent tube on the vacuum tank will do that too.

If you read the original problem, the carb is flooding whilst the engine is not running, that would eliminate the vac tank.

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So I tried the easy fix first and flipped the levers but still getting gas filling the bowl so I tried to raise the valve seat. I didn't have a thin washer so I put a gasket under it. Still filling the bowl.

 

I did notice that after running for some time, gas was coming out of the pipe leading to the engine flooding it.  I'm sure two separate issues but somethings up!

 

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Posted (edited)

One issue at a time.

 

The carburetor is leaking......why?

 

(1) valve is leaking in the seat (probable)

(2) the gasket under the seat is not sealing (possible)

(3) the casting is cracked (less likely than winning an argument with the IRS)

 

Eliminate (2) and (3) above by:

 

(1) remove the carburetor

(2) remove the seat

(3) glue a modern carb steel ball in the orifice on the UNDER side of the seat (you can easily remove it later by using a steel pin through the top)

(4) let the glue dry

(5) put a new fiber washer of the correct size on the thread of the seat

(6) reinstall the seat

(7) set the carb on your bench and attach a can of gas sitting as far above the carb as the vacuum tank normally sits to the carburetor fuel inlet

(8) it will either leak or it won't

 

If it leaks (I doubt that it will), start with a different carb.

 

If it doesn't leak, remove the seat, remove the check ball and wash out the glue (laquar thinner will probably remove the glue). Acquire some valve lapping compound, and apply the the steel end on the valve. Place the valve in a drill and rotate in the seat. Wash the valve lapping compound from the seat and valve. Wash it again. Do it a third time. Now, put the valve and seat back into the carb, put the bowl cover on the carb, and repeat the leak test. It will either leak or it won't.

 

If it does not leak reinstall on the car, and look for the vacuum tank issue.

 

If it still leaks, acquire and install a new fuel valve assembly!

 

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)

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I did notice that after running for some time, gas was coming out of the pipe leading to the engine flooding it.

 

I`m confused by this, are you referring to the pipe between the vac tank to carb ? and this occurs with the engine running ?

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No, the pipe between the cylinders.

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Take the carb off and bench test it where you can better see what's going on.

Plug the gas inlet at the bottom and with the cover off pour in some gas from the top while holding down the needle.

If gas leaks while you're holding down the needle the guessing games are over.

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So simply put,;

Seat the needle and pour gas in the bowl and see if it pours out of the inlet where the vacuum tank tube attaches....

 

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Pretty much....... :D

If that works put the float and cover back on to verify everything is working together.

You'll need a bit of rubber hose and a funnel to mimic actual conditions to properly bench test it.

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