chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

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Such a detailed....but very time consuming documentation of this "scary to most people" massive test of courage. 

 

I knew you'd have to keep test fitting the rear skin assembly, but did not suggest that, as I can tell that "this is not your first pony ride"  :)

 

We finally have a guy back on the restoration forum, to match the skills and determination of Dean H. , that did a super save on his 29 Hupp. 

 

Speaking of laminated OEM wood pieces to form a component, such as a A or B pillar..... I noticed something quite unusual a few days ago, on my rotted 1934 LaS parts car 4 door sedan with suicide front doors.  I took a pic then as I thought the group here would like to see the odd lamination.......and......delamination from the car being junked outdoors for a half century:

 

This is passenger side A pillar, which is the "latch pillar" for the R F door:

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I have never seen this type of angled joint used on a pillar before.  I suspect that angle joint/change of direction, has to do with the fact that the A pillar makes a long sweeping turn rearwards as it goes higher, to wrap around the curved vent wing shape of the closed car door body design.  This is a 34 Fleetwood body, as my 34 conv is Fleetwood, but my conv has bolt on windshield posts, meaning it has very short A pillars that are mostly straight,................ so mine lack this very odd joinery.

 

...

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Thank you for those kind words. I always try to do the absolute best work I can do, whether my car or a customers car. To do bad work is just a waste of time as it doesn't take much more time to do good work. I actually worked recently on a 31' Chevy that had its front hinge pillar laminated in a very similar way and just figured it was the factory finding ways to use up the wood they had on hand. Some of the laminations don't make sense to me but what do I know! 

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Still have more to do on the belt line but moved on to the bottoms of the deck rails. I made pieces stepped to mate with the lamination joinings so epoxy and screws will make secure joints. Used blocks clamped to the deck rails to make good straight cuts with the back saw. Once the lower pieces were shaped, I worked on the lower lid rail and knife edge location to position the lower sheet metal. Put the rumble lid in place an,d made some adjustments. It appears the drivers side of the lid has lost some of its arc to match the cars rear deck side line. Probably someone leaned too far back and too hard bending it slightly. I will need to curve it back to its proper shape some currently, the drivers side is a little longer than the passenger side because the arc has been straightened out some. All the other sides and lines align perfectly. The body metal was put back on again to check for fit and all it still lining up correctly.

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Great Dutchman joint on the lower rear tail part. Strong for sure. 

 

The curved wood around seat back in front of tulip panel is amazing... just in rough form. 

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Got the rumble lid arched properly today. I cut a 2x4 on the band saw in arc like the lid but made the center of the arc about 3/8" deeper than the actual lid . I put the 2x4 on the floor and the lid edge on the 2x4 with the piece I cut out on the inside of the lid edge. With a steel pipe cut to length on a bottle jack on the top 2x4 piece, I put the top of the pipe under on of my garage roof trusses.qpumping the jack slightly allowed me to get the lids arc correct. Ended up being pretty easy. Didn't get any pictures of the whole thing but it's done and good. I started checking all other areas and made adjustments where needed. Where the landau Arms pass through the body I found I had to adjust the bracket bolt holes through the belt line to get the landau arms in the center of the holes. Made sure the two latch pillars are square to the sill still,  will now work on the parcel shelf and finish the top of the belt line rail. Need to get it all correct so I can take it all apart, apply glue a, then put all the pieces back together again! Will try and get some pictures up tomorrow. Only have a couple of the lid with the flat arch before I fixed it. Other pictures show how the rocker aligns with the body panel lines, golf bag door, and the belt line wood.

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Getting more done every day. Made up the parcel shelf today and it's supports. Still have to cut the vertical board of the shelf to match the back of the seat frame. Have to rebuild my seat frame first. Put the seat adjuster in place and bolted the frame to it but it's just to twisted up to use as is for a guide to cut the shelf until it's repaired. Here are pictures of the adjusted landau bar mounts and the"massaged" rumble lid. Included a picture of the jig to bend the lid. The lines of the lid are now really good on all four sides. Also today's work. Lots of tedious things now. Hopefully the light is just down the tunnel.

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Received my newly cast free wheeling levers from Greg Coleman yesterday and had my neighbor clean up the casting marks and surface. Bored the shaft hole, the clevis pin hole, and the pinch bolt hole. Drilled and tapped the pinch bolt. Now to cut the pinch slot and key way. Took a little break from the woodwork.

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Worked with my router duplicator today and made up my two latch pillars for the Oldsmobile. Takes a little practice and setup but overall, it made up very serviceable pieces. Both fit correctly and the door jambs fit over like they should. Some sanding after and some hand chisel work in places clean up any areas where the router bit doesn't quite get. Putting on the jamb covers shows any places the wood is too high. A little more fitting and they're done. Won't screw them in until the sheet metal comes back from dustless blasting and I can refit the sheet metal on the frame.

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Started gluing/screwing the lower parts of the wood framework together and applied Cuprinol preservative. The ash is so good looking with the Cuprinol on it, it's a shame to cover it up. Will glue more together once the sheet metal body work comes back from blasting and I can fit to the new pillars to make sure all it correct. Blasted, primed, and painted up the rumble lid supports then re-installed them. Got the lower rumble pan support iron blasted, painted, and installed across the rear of the frame. Put the rear/rumble floor pan in place and will screw it down.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Built up the frame work for the golf bag door the other day. Anyone who's ever done one of these I'm sure will agree there's an excessive amount of work to get the contours just right to make the sheet metal all line up. The outer skin is held on the door by bending the edge of the skin over splines attached to the wood framework. Year back when the wood rotten, someone decided to just put two screws through the door skin so the screw holes got mig welded up and show as bare metal spots in the etch primer. The lock/latch for the door is different than most as it's not a handle but just the key to open the latch. These locks are often missing or damaged because of "white metal" failure and mine was gone. With the help of a friend acquiring the lower part of the latch and another friend with a machine shop, I was able to make up a close replacement complete with spring loaded dust cover. Ended up getting the lines and curves of the door pretty even all around with the opening so the door skin lip was hammered down flat to secure the skin to the word frame. One picture shows a view down the car's side to show the door's surface to the body's surface. A good heavy coat of black paint has it ready for it's interior panel.

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went to my friend's machine shop today and he taught me how to broach key way slots. I love learning something new when I can. Used a carbide rotary cutter to make the pinch slot. They're all done now and ready for priming and paint.

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Finished up the beltline wood and made up the top piece of the golf bag door body framing. Screwed down the rumble pan and checked the operation of the rumble lid on the bumper stops. Went to Downes and Reader (lumber company where I get my ash) and picked up a 4'x8'x3/4" sheet of ash plywood so I can make up the floor boards. Will also be using the play to make up the sides of the seat frame. I realize the frame was made originally from ash planks, tongue & grooved, then glued together, with steel braces for support. I will be using the plywood and all the same steel supports but the seat frame will be much stronger made from the ash plywood. It is a very nice sheet of plywood that is made like plywood used to be made. It is a full 3/4" thick and the sheet is actually 48.5" x 96.5" so the edges can be trimmed with a fine tooth blade to give super smooth and clean edges. The grain will look great with the cuprinol and copper naphthalene on it. Should look just like it originally did when it came out of Lansing. Covered up all the framing and rolled the body up to the front of the garage. Won't be doing much on it now while I work on my customer's 31' Chevy 5 passenger coupe. Doing the chassis work now. Have already done the rear and most of the chassis painting. Disassembled the front axle to find a broken brake cable housing and a very bad passenger side king pin. It will all get fixed up as part of the full, body off restoration. I will still try and squeeze in some work on the Olds. Got my Ross Racing pistons in today and took them to the machine shop. Basically works of art and are almost too pretty to put inside the motor! Pistons, rings, fitted wrist pins, and circlips came to just over $800 with shipping. This is for forged aluminum when Egge wanted over $1,200 for just 6 cast aluminum. The pistons come with a full spec sheet showing the weights of all pistons and the measurements of 4 areas on each. Very precise with all info as far as the ring grooves, wrist pin length, etc. A very first rate product. Sorry, forgot to get pictures but will do before the machine shop drops them in.

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Just remember that cuprinol and copper naphthalene will promote galvanic corrosion of fasteners in and steel against the wood.

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7 hours ago, chistech said:

Finished up the beltline wood and

 

7 hours ago, chistech said:

I will still try and squeeze in some work on the Olds.

 

Nice views of the upper wood structure..thanks.. But I too, lack time for my wood install in my LaS conv, due to other tasks.  I did get one hour late yesterday for more disassembly of that curved beam that runs under the rear deck,  down to the tail end of body.

 

oh, oh, I am in a bad spot now.  My car has two rear openings, for rumble as well as a lower trunk compartment.

 

I found out then that I cannot slide my rear body skin off, even "if" I had a stable wood skeleton... Fleetwood made the skin permanent, in between the two lids.  The metal was peened over around the wood cross beam the separates the lids.  I need more study time to see how I can do the wood at all, let alone in the car body skin, or skin removed.. :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Just remember that cuprinol and copper naphthalene will promote galvanic corrosion of fasteners in and steel against the wood.

 

Copper napthalene is what was originally used and our cars didn't fall apart after all these years and slight corrosion of the fastener helps hold them fast in the wood. Another thing with these cars is they never painted the metal on the inside, leaving it bare steel against the wood and elements. This car will be primed and painted on the inside which won't allow for that same sort of treated wood to bare metal contact. I don't have any fear of using the preservative for those reasons. 

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6 hours ago, chistech said:

 

Copper napthalene is what was originally used and our cars didn't fall apart after all these years and slight corrosion of the fastener helps hold them fast in the wood.

I had wondered if any fungicide was used originally and didn't think that one went back that far. Thanks for that tit-bit of info. I have specified copper naphthenate many times on outdoor timber structures such as retaining walls, but with stainless fixings.

 

Any more than a little corrosion of a fastener in timber results in "nail sickness".

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Got some time in on the Olds to work on the seat frame. Made up the lower framing of solid ash, making extra long tenons on the vertical mill and the slots on the table saw with the tenoning jig. I used the ash plywood to make up the sides of the frame rather than solid ash jointed together in two pieces like the original. The frame is super solid even with out the support irons that I will still be putting back on. Need to get upholster's waterproof board to fill in across the back over the slats.

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47 minutes ago, chistech said:

fill in across the back over the slats.

 

 

I see your Fisher seat back upper piece looks the same as my Fleetwood, in that flat board facing to the rear up top.  I have not understood why that flat board's face is 90 degrees to the floor?  Is it for some reason like being up against a bulkhead wall between the front seat and rumble area?(when slid back on tracks) 

 

I have a new one,  and a large part of a Used huge X wall?, but it may not be for my car at all.  I just cannot find how that X sits with what I do have for wooden framework.

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^^^nothing seems correct, the height, the unmatching curve up top. This one shown, is sitting on just a junk 2x4 to try to show why it looks wrong or backwards?  There must have been a bulkhead wall?,  IMO

Edited by F&J (see edit history)

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If you look at other pictures I've posted you'll see the face of the parcel tray that I haven't cut the matching arc to the seat back. When the seat goes back all the way, it sits right up to the face of the parcel tray face. That is why it's 90d to the floor, just like the face of tray. The wood you show might be the face of your parcel tray and it's supports.

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Went by the machine shop today to drop off some gaskets and took some pictures of my Ross Racing custom pistons and paperwork. These things are a work of art! Packaged very carefully and complete with fitted pins, rings, and circling. Look at the paperwork. All specs including each piston's weight and measurements. Ross is first class and very affordable. Got told not till next month before he can get the motor done. Bummer!

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From the pistons it looks like the conrods are at least an inch too short. The gudgeon pin should be at the top of the piston, not the bottom. I have noticed many prewar cars have this fault.

Matthew

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I don't think it is realistic to call that a "fault." It is a design issue. I suspect you will find that it is common to many engines where the stroke is long in relation to the diameter of the bore. On earlier engines, it was also common to offset the crankshaft, which exacerbates this issue. You will probably find that the rods pass very close to the lower edge of the bore in this engine as it is. Were the pin higher, it wouldn't work at all.

 

Edit: I went back and re-read this thread and realized that photos of the original in the block are shown. Look at them... you'll see that it would be physically impossible to raise the pins without making the rods hit the lower edges of the bores.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Wow, I wonder how this motor even ran with such a major fault! Too bad they didn't know then what some know now.

 

Getting back to the work now. Finished up the seat frame today. Got the metal brackets on it with blind nuts, the fiber board backing in, rebuilt the rear rollers, and got the front iron strap on. I then treated it with the copper green. Made up the front lower floor board out of the 3/4" ash plywood. Also primed the freshly blasted cowl and rear body up last Saturday morning. Will start putting in the patch panels in the 3 rotted out areas. The rear seat rollers on this car and many cabriolets are nothing more than stamped hollow metal wheels with a hollow rivet type axle bearing. They are pinned to the wheel's frame and peened over. After blasting the wheels I realized there had to be a better option as the wheels really didn't roll well. The wheels are 1.065 in diameter and .630 wide with a 1/4" axle. I worked with my local bearing shop to find a suitable ball bearing that I could work with. I used an RS8 bearing, 1.175 diameter, .310 wide, 1/2" bore. I purchased two 1/4 x 3/8 x 1" bushings, two 3/8 x 1/2 x 1" , and two 1/4 clevis pins from the local Ace Hardware store. I assembled the two bushing pairs together and cut them to .650 on my lathe. I pressed two bearings on each bushing assemblies, and I drilled out the one side of the seat roller frame to match the other 1/4" diameter. The new rollers now roll beautifully and have many ways to roll now. I believe this is a better solution than using the same type of wheel used originally.

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