chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

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The chassis got a good going over at the paint shop today. The etch primer got scuffed down with a red pad and then sprayed with gray urethane primer to just fill any rough areas from blasting. It did NOT get all imperfections removed. These cars were far from perfect and the wrong thing to do it to OVER restore it. I needed to put a new steel strap across the battery box side because the original had been rotted from batter acid. Once that was installed and primed. The chassis got sealed to prevent any areas from rusting then it got painted in a single stage black. Here are a couple pictures in the booth before painting. Going to pick it up tomorrow from the paint shop. More pictures to come.

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My neighbor and friend, Scott Ciardi, owner of "Brass from the Past" worked on the Old's brake cables. Luckily, the cables were not rusted, pitted or frayed. The cables had old grease and some surface rust. The cable housings had the same thing plus lots of road dirt in them. Some glass beading and some light polishing to a stock satin type finish, yielded some amazing results. They virtually look like new and will look great on the newly painted, black chassis. Scott does incredible work!

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Got my chassis and axles back yesterday but haven't taken a picture of the chassis as of yet. I have installed the new felt outer axle seals on the rear and put on the backing plates. I made a seal installation tool from PVC pipe. I heated the pipe to put a flair on it and glued thin PVC shim stock inside to center the pipe on the axle. A smaller PVC pipe glued in the end fits over the threaded section of the axle. I put the tool in my vertical mill and milled a 1/4" slot in it to fit the shaft's keyway. The tool stays firmly in place and allows the new felt seal to slide over the metal seal ring on the axle. The axle and chassis were painted with a single stage, high solids, black. John LIma, brother of the owner of the owner, Moses, of Extreme Paint and Collision in New Bedford, MA really did a great job on this and all my other paint work I've sent to them.

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Got the chassis back from the painters and off the trailer. Put on the leaf springs and front axle. Installed the king pins and bushings along with backing plates. Nothing is fully tightened as I'm waiting on some specific rubber parts. Have to make up the felt washers that go in the shackle ends also. Installed the rear springs but waiting on the new rubber/fabric spring pads to install the rear axle. Starting to come together piece by piece.

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Needed to replace a broken wheel stud in one of the rear drums. The 32' Olds uses a unique wheel stud that has a coned shaped flange sandwiched between the drum and the hub flange. The stud are put in from inside the drum and then the whole assembly is pressed together sandwiching all the studs in. They cannot be removed like a conventional stud can. I mounted the drum to my vertical miller and milled off the remaining part of the broken stud, then bored a hole through the original stud's flange that remained in the hub. A new conventional 1/2-20 wheel stud was pressed in from the back repairing the wheel.

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My 32' DCR is of fairly early production (1st-2nd wk of Feb) and my spare frame/driveline is of late production. I observed a major frame change between the two that I thought was interesting. The early frames require the front motor mount metal bracket to be removed from the frame for the rubber mount to be changed out. This means that the metal part of the mount is bolted in, both through the bottom of the rail with 5/16x24 bolts and through the side rail with the 9/16 x18 shock bolts. The center bolt running through the rubber mount is a large slotted head bolt.

     The later production frame has the metal part of the motor mount riveted in. The lower chassis rail has a bulbous area with a 1" hole allowing the mount center bolt (now a hex head) to be removed from below the frame and no longer requiring the removal of the metal mount or shock bolts/shock. The engine splash pans were also changed along with the frame to accommodate the bulbous lower rail.

 

1.) my early production frame with bolt in motor mount lower frame

2.) my parts frame with bulbous lower rail and hole to access mount center bolt

3.) drivers side rail. rotted piece of engine splash pan with a shaped area for around hole is to the left of the mount

4.) late production serial # 311068

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Thanks Jerry. It keeps coming along. Blasted the drums today and with take them for paint. Installed the brake cross shaft with a new stainless steel 3/8" shaft. Put 1 1/2" pieces of heater hose on the front brake cables for anti-chafe and mounted the casing ends in their brackets. Temporarily attached the cable clevis to the brake cross shaft. All brakes will be adjusted to specs once the drums are on. Finished installing all brake components on the rear axle preparing it to be mounted to the springs. Got all the shock control rods blasted, primed, and painted.

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All the rubber parts came in today and got both axles all bolted up tight. Installed all shock arm bushings and connecting link bushings, then bolted all up tight. The new front rebound bumpers on he front axle fit perfect and the rear axle got mounted with all new spring pads. The shock valve control rods were all mounted and new rubber eyelets run on the supports. This chassis is virtually new to this point and should go down the road real nice and quiet.

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Picked up my brake drums, drive shaft, fender supports, floor pans, and tool tray from the paint shop. All the sheet metal has been put away until needed. Completely checked/cleaned all the bearings and replace one inner front race. Bought new modern seals for the inner bearing on the front. Installed all 4 drums then adjusted all the brakes per specs in the manual. Installed the brake/clutch pedals, stop light switch, and put the wheels on so I can drop it off the rotisserie. Still need to do the wheels. I have two full sets (12) with 3 of the natural ones damaged from raccoons. I will be soda blasting three of the painted ones I have to get them back to natural.

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Disassembled both the starter and generator replacing the bearings on the generator. It is a full ball bearing unit with a through shaft. The generator is in a fixed position on the Oldsmobile and the water pump is driven off the back shaft. Both units were pretty crappy on the inside so the field coils were removed and the housings fully bead blasted and painted. Once the generator was reassembled, I put it on my lathe to adjust the 3rd brush. It is running right at manual specs, 8.5volts cold. Both units had their respective labeling applied and will be stored until needed.

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Got the frame off the rotisserie and on it's un-restored wheels. Rolled it outside for some fresh air and loaded it in my car trailer to store it while I'm working on another car. Found all the parts for my engine rebuild and the rebuild is coming along nicely.

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IMG-20170222-00311.jpg.849416bc9f1f423697c40bce4cf140c4.jpgMy 32' Olds came with two sets of wood wheels. One set natural varnished and the other set painted red. Three of the natural varnished ones (the finish I want to use) were damaged by raccoons. I decided tonight to try and scrape the paint from one of the red wheels to see how hard it would be to clean them down to natural wood again. Once I started scraping on the back I realized that the paint was coming right off and there was varnish underneath so very little of the red paint penetrated the wood grain. On the front of the wheels as the red scraped off, there was yellow underneath. The same yellow as the car had been painted years back. Unfortunately, before the yellow was painted they must have lightly sanded so some yellow has penetrated the grain but still not bad. A light soda blasting should remove most if not all of it. I will still need to media blast the steel parts after the wood has been masked off for protection. Once the site is fully up and running my pictures should upload.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Be careful blasting wood spokes as the wood grain may raise up if done too deep.

 

Yes, you remove the softer grain lines and leave the harder layers. You also impregnate the wood with blasting media. Water blasting has the same effect.

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8 hours ago, 42319DB34 said:

Oxalic acid , cleans and bleaches wood ....

Thanks for that info. I have one wheel completely cleaned out and there's some dark spots I'd like to even out with the rest of the wood. I'll give it a try.

Ted

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8 hours ago, 42319DB34 said:

Oxalic acid , cleans and bleaches wood ....

 

I have used lime juice to take stains out of English oak. Probably the citric acid was the active agent. It smelt nice while working with it too.

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The wife and I have been discussing the colors we want to paint the Olds. There were four color combos in 32' and the two tone brown is out (because of my 31' chevy in my picture, and the black fenders with maroon body is out. It leaves a two tone blue and the all black schemes. My car was originally an all black car with natural wheels. I've included a factory promo picture of an all black one with the black painted wheels. There appears to be no pinstripe or any color "saddles" at the top of the door which would be cream colored which leads me to believe this was a pre-production photo. The all black looks very classy and would be VERY easy to paint. Downside is the hard up keep to having it look great all the time.

 

Did some more fine hand scraping with a concave cabinet scraper. Also used some lacquer thinner with a small fine wire brush. The two in combination have just about removed all the paint. Tedious work yes but coming out good so far. Will have to try the oxalic acid on it,  Put he wheel in my blast cabinet and blasted the rim and hub. Put some etch primer on the inside of the rim and the outside edges just to keep any surface rust down. Need to mask the spokes to finish the priming. Going to have a friend make up vinyl stencils for the sprocket pattern on these wheels so the hub painting is easier once I get to that point. It will be nice having all he wheels done.

 

Motor rebuild is advancing nicely. The rods have been poured and are just waiting on the measurements from the machine shop on the polished journals so Paul's can ream them to fit. My cam, lifters, intake valves/springs/guides are all good but I needed new exhaust valves/springs/guides and a new timing chain. A NOS chain came from North Western and the valves/springs/guides all came from Then and Now in Weymouth, MA (my own back door!) I should have he valves tomorrow and will be dropping them off at the machine shop. Still waiting on the new bore dimensions so the pistons can be ordered from Ross Racing Pistons in CA. Hopefully another 4-6 weeks and the motor might be home.

 

Got the driveshaft all finished up and made new plugs for the greasing holes. There should be a plug in both ends but most are found with zerks installed which actually causes an imbalanced drive shaft. The plug is made to have a very low profile once installed. The driveshaft will also be going for balancing.

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