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Really this is more of an advanced warning. Yesterday I paid for the 1912 Humber which will become my next project.

First thing is to get it transported from Willunga in the McLaren Vale wine district of South Australia the 800 kilometers to our home in Doncaster East, Victoria, Australia. This should be happening sometime during the coming week. The Humber is an 11hp four cylinder, side valve. It will be my first restoration of a Pre WW1 car, it is truly a basket case; totally dismantled and with what remains of the body little more that scaps of rusty sheet metal. As I have commented to some of my friends the only way that it could be  reduced to smaller pieces would be to remove the spokes from the wheels. 

 

Bj.

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bernie if any one can do it you can,will be looking forward to watching it come back to life after the dixie i dont think its much of a challenge for you     dave

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Bernie,

Will be waiting to see the bits come together to make a wonderful automotive wonder.  Enjoy! 

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Thank you all for your votes of confidence. I hope I can live up to your expectations. I am still waiting (impatiently)  to hear that it all has been collected and is safely on it's way home. Right now I am working on a brief history of Humber. Unfortunately the vendor seems to be unable to give me very much background on how or when he acquired it. Having said that he has been meticulous in saving and packing away all the small parts, nuts and bolts after cleaning them and placing them in waterproof containers. 

 

Bj

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Thomas Humber originally apprenticed as a black-smith was already a successful cycle racer when he first set up as a manufacturer of "Ordinary" (Penny-farthing) velocipedes and Tricycles making his first complete bicycle in 1868. He later branched out into making Motorcycles. By the time he retired in1892 he had effectively lost control of his company. Unfortunately the company ran into a series of financial "misadventures" in the hands of unscrupulous speculators.

By 1898 Humber were manufacturing a motorised tricycle, selling a side 7 side seated "Motor Sociable.   In 1900 the company was reformed as Humber Limited with factories in both Beeston and in nearby Coventry. By 1901 Humber were building a four wheeled Humber Motor Car powered by a 4 1/2 HP De Dion engine. A year later in 1902 Humber had a full four seater 12hp car designed by Louis Coatalen. A year later this had grown to a 20hp. An "up-market version with a "new" honeycomb radiator sold in the UK for 800 Guineas. A 'sporting' version said to be capable of 2,000 rpm was catalogued as the Tourist Trophy model.

Following yet another re-structuring the Beeston factory was closed and production was moved to the Coventry factory.

For the start of the new decade (1910) the catalogue included 8, 12, 16 and 20hp models including a "Racing two seater" with detachable wire spoke wheels. By 1912 the year of my "car"the catalogue a new model the 11 hp having for the first time a four cylinder 'monobloc' with the four cylinders cast in a single block. Up until then all Humber models had the cylinders cast in pairs. 
The 11hp had a foot-brake working with contracting bands acting on a drum mounted at the rear of the gearbox. The hand brake, with the lever mounted outside the body-work acted on internal "metal to metal" shoes inside drums on the rear wheels only. 

Only just prior to the commencement of hostilities that grew into the conflict now known as World War 1.

Humber engaged in building a team of three sophisticated racing two seaters for the Tourist Trophy races on the Isle of Mann. Unfortunately none of the three actualy finished the race. At least one has survived and is in private ownership in England.

During 1912-14 a special bodied  11 hp broke a number of class records at Brooklands.

My copy of the Humber Cars catalogue for 1913 runs to 32 pages.

 

 

1914_Isle_of_Man_TT_Humber.jpg

1913 brooklands - humber record attempt.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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I know how some of you are anxious to see a photograph of my next project. This is about the best one I have for the moment.

 

Bj

P1090803.JPG

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Oh wow, Bernie.........hopefully this isn't all of it?? :D  If it is, you are the bravest man I know!

 

All kidding aside, really looking forward to your posts on this one.

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Oh good, looks like someone's already done the "hard work" for you by taking it apart.  Should be a cinch to paint the parts and put them back together... because, you know.., all the parts are there and they are all perfect. ;)

 

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Hi all,

 

Well! we are off to a flying start. My good friend Mel (with the big trailer) hopes to collect all the Humber "stuff" over the weekend but he cannot make the trip to Victoria until next thursday/friday. So we will all have to be a little patient, especially me. The good thing about this is that the Peugeot gets to live in the carport for another week.

 

Bj.

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Hello jp928

I think that your Rover is one from a deceased estate here in Victoria Australia. I went to look at it two or three times. For a little while there were two for sale, both from different deceased estates, not a good sign when you are my advanced age! I knew the previous owner and his standard of work was in my humble opinion very good. While it represents some additional work, I think that the 1912 Humber is more of a challenge, something I enjoy.

 

Bj.

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Hello Zimm63

Welcome to my thread. You are partially correct the two cast iron ends from the muffler are recoverable and and will be used

The sections of mudguard will be used as patterns, bad as they may seem most things are saved for a purpose. As the restoration progresses you may be amazed how useful all that "junk" is. You have to remember this car is 104  years old and you don't just run down to the 'parts shop's to get replacements.  Oh yes, I nearly forgot, I will have  to work out a way to use the cylinder block and the sump too.  Actually, looking at the photograph again there is a whole lot of recoverable stuff in there, you just have to look a little more closely.

Brake rods, section of the hood (top) frame, bonnet (hood) latch, etc etc, not to mention the spring base for the seat.

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Looks to me that what isn't restorable is still needed as patterns for the restoration. Does it come with instruments, lights and acetylene generator etc?

Matthew

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Hello Mathew

Originally there were no instruments on the dash board, just a single sight tube to confirm that the oil pump was working and oil being  circulated in the engine. The 1912 had a scuttle mounted petrol tank which fed petrol to the carb by gravity. There was provision for this to be assisted by pressure from the exhaust manifold. With this there would be a pressure gauge reading up to 5psi. If this system (with a rear mounted tank) was being used there would be a hand air pump for starting.

Lights. horn, windscreen, folding top were all optional extras. Side and tail light were electric and where fitted, head lanps were acetylene. There would have been a switch for the magneto but that was about all. It is all a very steep learning curve. I can't wait to get it all home and start sorting it out. Don't go away.

 

Bj.

Humber11 8.jpg

Humber Chassis 846.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Hello all

I have just heard from Mel who has collected all the Humber bits for me. He will arrive at East Doncaster first thing in the morning. My very good friend John Harvey helped him load all the "stuff".

IMG_2281.JPG

IMG_2282.JPG

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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