Frantz

Paint process for master cyl on 54 Ford

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Got a '54 and while I'm not doing a full restoration at this point, I figure it'd be good practice to restore whatever parts I do work on. Knowing how brake fluid is on paint, is there a proper or advised way to paint a master cylinder so that it holds up over time? For the Ford specifically how glossy was the factory paint? Thanks!

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Well now that you mention it, most pictures don't look painted on the old googletron! That'd be problem solved!

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It wasn't painted from the factory, but every restored car with a rusty M/C looks like crap under the hood, in my opinion. Eastwood now sells a master cylinder paint that is allegedly resistant to brake fluid. 

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Yep, I've seen the sorta clear coat preservation paint to keep metal finishes looking original and fresh. I'll order a can this week along with a bench top blaster. Thanks!

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I use silicone Fluid whenever I do a system over.  Since you're doing the master it's not much more to go through the cylinders and flush the lines.  You will never have paint problems after that.  I use the Eastwood spray gray, cast iron finish.  You also won't have to worry about the master and wheel cylinders rusting up from moisture again. 

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Yes, I'm redoing all the cylinders too. It's a car that has been sitting for 15+ years, and last inspected in '79. Frankly getting it to stop is more important than getting it to go!

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21 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

I use silicone Fluid whenever I do a system over.  Since you're doing the master it's not much more to go through the cylinders and flush the lines.  You will never have paint problems after that.  I use the Eastwood spray gray, cast iron finish.  You also won't have to worry about the master and wheel cylinders rusting up from moisture again. 

This is the way to go. !!!

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Agree - we've run silocone in our MGB since it was restored in 2006.  Thousands of winding country roads later we couldn't be happier.  No annual bleeding needed, no rust, moisture or crud issues.  Will be using it in my GTO soon also when I redo the brake system and upgrade to power assist.

Terry

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On 4/26/2016 at 10:12 AM, auburnseeker said:

I use silicone Fluid whenever I do a system over.  Since you're doing the master it's not much more to go through the cylinders and flush the lines.  You will never have paint problems after that.  I use the Eastwood spray gray, cast iron finish.  You also won't have to worry about the master and wheel cylinders rusting up from moisture again. 

 

I agree, I have silicone fluid in all of my cars. I had it in my 60 Impala for over 25 years. Last summer I did a fresh up on the car and the fluid came out as clean as it went in. I recommend replacing everything lines and hoses also, this way there is zero chance for contamination. 

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Yeah a blaster cabnet was purchased this year with tax returns so it'll be nice and clean first. Then I'll paint with the Eastwood product. If I don't like it, I'll just blast again!

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I just in the last 2 months had my master Cylinder and all 4 wheel cylinders rebuilt ( including bored and brass sleeved ) at White Post, I wanted to use Dot 5 Silicon Fluid

going back in .Im replacing all the lines, hoses ,cleaned all the fittings on my 25 Chrysler. They advised me to Do Not Use Silicon fluid and if I did, my lifetime Warranty is

Null and Void. Anybody know why ?? They just said its bad stuff only used by the military for a short time and to flush and change the brake fluid once a year. Ive read mostly all positive things about Dot 5. With living in Florida with very high humidity and the paint issues I thought the Silicon would be perfect. HAs folks had issues with using Silicon

in brass sleeved systems? Do you need special seals in the MC and Whl Cylndrs ?   Cricket

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I have had all my collector car wheel and master cylinders sleeved with stainless steel at Brake and Equipment Warehouse in Mpls,  They recommend DOT5

Never a leak.

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I have eight years experience using DOT 5 in my 1950 Packard... The previous owner had changed it over and was thoughtful enough to put a tag on the master cylinder warning the unsuspecting of the contents.  I've had zero problems with DOT 5 and will be using it in my 1941 Packard Limousine when I install all new brake lines.

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Dot 5 in my '36 Chevy, only problem was with the stoplight switch. It allowed some current leak when parked after a few days but always worked to light the lamp.

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OLD stop light switches do have this problem. Get a new one from NAPA and .that problem dissolves. 

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I very much wanted to use DOT 5 in my Pontiac with Treadle Vac Power Brakes for several reasons, but got leakage into the vacuum chamber.  I had it rebuilt by one of the best treadle vac guys and he said he discourages DOT 5 because of this greater chance of seeping past seals than regular fluid.  I refilled with DOT 5 anyway for a careful initial trial, no problem from the brake system itself, I am about to plug in the vacuum and hope for the best, would be interested if anyone else has used DOT 5 in their Treadle Vac, Todd C 

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11 hours ago, poci1957 said:

I very much wanted to use DOT 5 in my Pontiac with Treadle Vac Power Brakes for several reasons, but got leakage into the vacuum chamber.  I had it rebuilt by one of the best treadle vac guys and he said he discourages DOT 5 because of this greater chance of seeping past seals than regular fluid.  I refilled with DOT 5 anyway for a careful initial trial, no problem from the brake system itself, I am about to plug in the vacuum and hope for the best, would be interested if anyone else has used DOT 5 in their Treadle Vac, Todd C 

On my 2 '56 Cads I'm using the DOT 5; they have both the Treadle Vac power brakes, one with the Bendix and the other with the Delco-Moraine unit. It the plunger piston is absolutely rust free, there is no loss or seepage of fluid.

On one of the units, I had initially a tiny rust spot; after a while, I had troubles. As at that time new pistons were not yet available, I let hard chrome that piston. Since that, no problem anymore.

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Thanks Roger, my Treadle Vac guy installed a new stainless piston, I think, so hopefully I will be OK.  I don't know about Cadillacs but 1950s Pontiacs still have the master under the floor and under my freshly painted steering column, so I am quite determined to use DOT 5 and avoid regular fluid if at all possible, thanks, Todd C

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In that case, we are not speaking about the same brake system. The Treadle-Vac has an integrated master cylinder. The system you have was used on '54, 55 and 57 Cadillacs. It has another name: Hydrovac. My '57 Brougham has the same system, I'm using also DOT 5 since years.

A friend of mine with a '55 Eldo is using also the DOT 5 without problem.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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