SwedeDownUnderR63

Flowkooler water pump in none-AC + questions on what more to replace when doing timing chain

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Hi,

Looking for some advice as I am planning to change water pump and timing chain/gears in my 160000 miles 1963 401. I couldn’t find any information about this being changed in the service records from 1963-2006 and I would like to replace all parts that are in the are easy to access in the way to the timing chain.

There have been some very good appends regarding this in the Forums but I have a few questions and I am definitely out of my comfort zone with this (I will involve my mechanic but need to understand the best approach first):

  • Flowkooler water pump looks great but it is for AC, is there an issue to put this on a none-AC car such as mine or will it only improve the cooling?

  • Note that I will install Vintage air next year and I have already bought the following parts (picture below) “401 425 Buick Nailhead Alternator & AC Brackets & AC 3 Groove Pulleys 63 – 66” that I thought that could be installed at the same time as I changed the water pump unless there is something else that I need to add/change. I know that I will have to get another radiator later for better cooling with the A/C but is there something else that I need to look at now? Thermal fan clutch?

  • A new Timing Chain cover (with neoprene seal) + chain and gear (steel). Is the gasket normally included in a new cover or is that something I need to order extra?

  • It seems that the Harmonic Balancer is good to change at the same time?

  • Fuel Pump?

  • Anything else that you can suggest?

Thanks for any advice.

401 425 Buick Nailhead Alternator & AC Brackets & AC 3 Groove Pulleys 63 - 66.jpg

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Hi Jan,

That must just be a brand name but any pump for non-AC car should work fine with no detrimental effects, and probably the way to go if you're planning on adding AC soon. AC cars had fan shrouds and 20" dia blades and clutch. You can get all these parts except the 20" fan blades and shroud from All American Auto Parts (AAAP) in Ballarat. They offer 10% discount to Buick Club members.

If you don't have a fan shroud I have a mould and can get them made. click here and go to the bottom of the page.

The timing cover gasket set comes with your new timing chain, also available from AAAP

 

This is the fan you should get

 

IMG_9472_Med_med.JPG

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3 hours ago, fatbuick said:

Hi Jan,

That must just be a brand name but any pump for non-AC car should work fine with no detrimental effects, and probably the way to go if you're planning on adding AC soon. AC cars had fan shrouds and 20" dia blades and clutch. You can get all these parts except the 20" fan blades and shroud from All American Auto Parts (AAAP) in Ballarat. They offer 10% discount to Buick Club members.

If you don't have a fan shroud I have a mould and can get them made. click here and go to the bottom of the page.

The timing cover gasket set comes with your new timing chain, also available from AAAP

 

This is the fan you should get

 

IMG_9472_Med_med.JPG

Hi Tony,

Thank you.

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Hi Jan, I opted for the Flowkooler pump for my 63 with air conditioning. We cop some real heat in Australia and the last thing you want is to have it overheating, especially as you are putting air in later. It has good water flow at low rpm, which is what you need in traffic or at idle. Have included a photo of the business end of the Flowcooler pump, as well as the fan and shroud. Came direct from Flowkooler in the US.

 

And as other posts suggest, the cars fitted with air also used a fan shroud that Tony Gentilecore can supply. They also used a thermatic clutch fan with multi blades. I also had the radiator fitted with a four core recore locally ( Victor Harbor) as my old radiator was blocked and became a sprinkler when it was rodded out. I'm hoping to run a 13psi cap given the increased capacity and cooling ability, but time will tell. Am using a 180 degree thermostat, with a small 1.5mm hole drilled in the plate so any air trapped in the system can escape.

 

as regard to the timing gears I also used steel gear set to replace the nylon gear as I wanted reliability. Unfortunately the previous owner had two bolts broken in the timing cover, so have one coming from Centreville auto. It has the later neoprene seal. You can see in the photo the new Mellings gear and Sealed Power chain with crank gear, all from All American  Auto Parts.

 

as soon as my new cover arrives, all will be tested and revealed. Good luck with yours?

Rodney

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Consider getting new mounting hardware.you don't want a bolt snapping off in the block due to corrosion and age. Why a new harmonic balancer? Unless your original is damaged I would not change it.i could be mistaken but I think these engines are balanced externally and the harmonic balancer is part of the balancing.

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Hi All,

I am reopening this one again as I finally have started the timing chain work. I got all the parts over a year ago but was too eager to drive…

 It seems that I am doing this in the last minute as it looks like I have nylon gears with a 15 mm (~5/8 inch) slack in the chain.

Last time I did this was under supervision by my brother in law (who knows a lot more about engines then I but we now live half a world apart) in the 70’s and being a mechanical idiot, I am looking for your advice.

 

Q1.

The first picture is of the old chain in what I understand is the correct position for starting to remove it. I did find a “0” on the crankshaft sprocket but only something more like an arrow on the camshaft sprocket (both white in the picture). Could you confirm that this is correct?

If this is correct, then I don’t understand the following from the -63 Buick Chassis Service Manual on p2-27 in 2-16a-7:

  • When ready to install timing chain, turn crankshaft until Nos. 1 and 4 pistons are on top dead center. Turn camshaft so that the sprocket key points straight down towards crankshaft. See figure 2-26.

     

Wouldn’t the above correct position already have the pistons in the correct position or is this just a double check?

 

Q2.

The new chain (from nailheadbuick as the new timing cover and more) is in picture 2. The camshaft sprocket “0” (or more like a white circle indentation) seems clear but the crankshaft sprocket seems to have one white indentation in the inner “ring” (almost straight up in the picture) and another one on the bottom of a gear ~45 degrees to the right in the picture. I assume that it is the one on the gear that should be pointing up thus this, as in the picture, needs to be rotated ~45 degrees counter clockwise?

 

Q3.

I have all the torque specs (nailheadbuick has it all in addition to the manual) but I broke one small water pump bolt and several looked rather weak, so I got a 18-8 stainless kit for a 401 from Alloy Boltz (which I will use on the timing cover, petrol pump, water pump and the water manifold). They come with their own reduced torque settings which I guess I should use together with the Anti-Seize. The kit also come with washers which is what confuses me somewhat. The washers are not original in place but I guess there is a reason to use them with stainless steel, any comments?

 

Q4.

Not that much left of the sump gasket below the timing chain cover. I am trying to avoid having to take out the engine to change the gasket at least at this time. I do have the sump gasket and thought about cutting of a small part just for this. Probably not the best idea that I have had so I hope someone has a suggestion for a temporary fix?

 

Q5.

The Alternator & AC Brackets & AC 3 Groove Pulleys that I bought for later A/C conversion (see the top picture in this thread) has been complemented with an A/C 20" dia blades fan and clutch, fan shrouds is on its way from Tony Gentilcore.

Does anyone have a picture of the brackets installed for a -63 A/C? Some of it is obvious but the rightmost thin ring in the above picture is a mystery for me and the small "rectangular" part to the left of the lower larger Groove Pulley is also unclear in regards to what it is used for.

I have also seen something about the bolt that is connecting the Generator bracket to the engine needs to be longer on an A/C car. From nailheadbuick:

  • "some cars like  63-64 Riviera and all 1965-66 401-425 with AC use a special head bolt that is about 1/4" longer on the front passenger side, the bolt goes through the ALT/AC compressor bracket and into the head. "

It is not clear if I need to change this bolt, I don't see the reason why?

 

 

Old Timing Cain lined up.jpeg

new chain.jpeg

Edited by SwedeDownUnderR63
Minor error correction (see edit history)

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Just looking at the new sprockets and chain in the box, I think that the bottom sprocket can be set for any two degrees of advance or retard that you want.  The way you have it setting in the box is for 0 degrees.  The 2A would be a 2 degree advance, and the 2R would be a two degree retard.

 

Over the life of the nailhead production, different years had different cams.  There were differences in lift, duration, lobe separation, and advance/retard.  Depending on what cam you have, will determine where you want to set the bottom sprocket.  Below is an article from an older edition of the Riview in which Dennis Manner tells about the development of the cams for the nailhead 401/425 - 1959 - 1966.  So depending on which cam you have,  pick where you want the bottom sprocket to match up with the top sprocket.  There's a white dot on the tooth above the key way for each different setting.  Line those up. You'll have to open the PDF file to see which keyway slot you'll want to use.  (None of them match the original, perhaps you should contact Russ Martin for advice.).  

 

1959 - 1966 Buick Nailhead Cam Specs.PDF

 

I think the washers are needed because of the shape of the bottom of the bolt on the head. ???????  If you bought the Allen head bolt kit (you didn't specify,)  it could also be that the head isn't as wide as a hex head and the washer is needed to spread out the force.

 

The one head bolt is longer because it goes through the a/c bracket Before being threaded into the head.  The extra length compensates for the thickness of the bracket. If you put the bolt in first, you'll never get the bracket on.

 

 

 

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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Relative to advancing or retarding the cam, an advance will give you more low end torque and the reverse for retard. We found with racing engines, the factory marks were not very accurate so we had to degree every set of gears with the cam. It was surprising how far off they could be off considering the crank keyway, indexing of the cam, etc. And by the way, they were always different! We standardly would run the cam 4 degrees advanced in drag racing applications. For land speed applications, we would run the cams retarded to get more high end horsepower.

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13 hours ago, RivNut said:

Just looking at the new sprockets and chain in the box, I think that the bottom sprocket can be set for any two degrees of advance or retard that you want.  The way you have it setting in the box is for 0 degrees.  The 2A would be a 2 degree advance, and the 2R would be a two degree retard.

 

Over the life of the nailhead production, different years had different cams.  There were differences in lift, duration, lobe separation, and advance/retard.  Depending on what cam you have, will determine where you want to set the bottom sprocket.  Below is an article from an older edition of the Riview in which Dennis Manner tells about the development of the cams for the nailhead 401/425 - 1959 - 1966.  So depending on which cam you have,  pick where you want the bottom sprocket to match up with the top sprocket.  There's a white dot on the tooth above the key way for each different setting.  Line those up. You'll have to open the PDF file to see which keyway slot you'll want to use.  (None of them match the original, perhaps you should contact Russ Martin for advice.).  

 

1959 - 1966 Buick Nailhead Cam Specs.PDF

 

I think the washers are needed because of the shape of the bottom of the bolt on the head. ???????  If you bought the Allen head bolt kit (you didn't specify,)  it could also be that the head isn't as wide as a hex head and the washer is needed to spread out the force.

 

The one head bolt is longer because it goes through the a/c bracket Before being threaded into the head.  The extra length compensates for the thickness of the bracket. If you put the bolt in first, you'll never get the bracket on.

 

 

 

Hi Ed,

Thank you, I always value your suggestions. My comments, further questions:

 

My Q1 and Q2 above (timing chain and sprockets):

I understand that the new crankshaft sprocket can be set in 9 different ways to get it in 0 degrees or in multiples of 2 degrees advance or retard by using different keyslots. The original (?) crankshaft sprocket has only one keyslot and one “0” making it easy to install. I guess my 401 is very much stock and it seems to me that most vendors are only selling crankshaft sprocket with one keyslot (the same for 63-66). Russ timing chain set is for stock or performance engines which is probably the reason for the many possibilities to install it and maybe to get the best fit for the multitudes of cams that seems to have been used for the 401.

 

My only concern is how to find the correct “0”. It is my understanding that it even if it isn’t the optimal for whatever cam that is in my car it should work. I guess the below picture is the correct with the outer “0” (at the teeth) pointing up and the inner “0” mark on the keyslot to be used. This is different to the previous picture which I think was wrong for 0 degrees (comments are welcome).

 

BTW I will make certain that Nos. 1 and 4 pistons are on top dead center in anyway.

 

 

Q3 Stainless Steel bolts:

The SS bolt kit that I bought has hex heads. I will use the washers although that means that the bolts won’t go as long in as the originals. 

 

 

Q4 Oil pan gasket:

I should have looked in the gasket kit that I got for the timing chain cover before posting the above question. There is a small gasket included to go under the timing chain cover so Q4 is not an issue…

 

 

Q5 (First step to A/C conversion):

I have just measured the generator brackets both without and with A/C. Both must be installed with the head bolt going through the bracket before being threaded into the head. Don’t know why it seems that Russ website talks about the need for an extra length for A/C as they are installed the same way as none A/C for the 63 Riviera, maybe he means they are different for other Buicks of that year or maybe it is me misunderstanding the information (never happened before…).

 

I would still appreciate if someone could tell me where the rightmost thin ring with holes in should go (see the top picture in this thread). Is it for inside/outside of the larger Groove Pulley or for something else? (None-A/C cars doesn’t seem to have it).

5a8265fdcb1fb_newchaincentered.thumb.jpeg.db3ed79d6e92830984e7a9b0318ffa9a.jpeg

Edited by SwedeDownUnderR63 (see edit history)

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The original small sprocket had either 0.5,  2.5,  or 5 degrees built into it as specified in the PDF file that I posted. You need to get as close to whichever your cam came with and go back and re-read the post by JohnRex about advancing and retarding a camshaft.  Say you want 2 degrees advance,  you put the keyway in the 2A slot, then you line up the 2A tooth with the cam sprocket - white dots. You'd do the same for 0 degrees. 0 on the keyway slot, then line up the 0 tooth with the cam - white dots.

 

Chances are that when the bolts were laid out for each engine the layout guy didn't know if it was an a/c or non-a/c so he laid out one longer bolt for every engine.  You have air now so that's no longer an issue. You need a long bolt for the a/c bracket.

 

The thin all-in-one washer goes between the bottom pulley and the balancer.  (I think, its been a while)   Get confirmation on this before proceeding. 

 

 

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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4 hours ago, RivNut said:

The thin ring goes on the bottom pulley. It's  an all in one washer between the bolts and the bottom pulley where the pulley bolts to the balancer.

 

The original small sprocket had either 2.5 or 5 degrees built into it as specified in the PDF file that I posted. You need to get as close to whichever your cam came with and go back and re-read the post by JohnRex about advancing and retarding a camshaft.  You don't want to set it at 0 though. Probably 2 or 4 advanced.  From what I see is that you put the keyway in the 2A slot, then you line up the 2A tooth with the cam sprocket - white dots. (If you want 2 degrees advance)

 

Chances are that when the bolts were laid out for each engine the layout guy didn't know if it was an a/c or non-a/c so he laid out one longer bolt for every engine.  You have air now so that's no longer an issue.

 

 

Hi Ed,

Great info about the A/C parts.

 

I am still somewhat confused regarding the sprocket. Mine is markt S276R9 (no brand name) while the standard crank sprockets at Rockauto are either called S276 or have a number ending in 276 and they are the same for both 401 and 425 (in 1963). The one from Cloyes as an example has an OEM partnumber of 1173853 which corresponds to the number in the Buick Master Parts Book for 4700 in 1963. I can only guess that the S276 already is set with the correct degrees built into it (as you hinted above).

Wouldn't it then make sense that the S276R9 that I have already have the standard original degrees (5 I guess in this case)  built in at the "0" location and the alternatives are then advances or retards from that position? Maybe I should try to call Russ...

 

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Q3 Stainless Bolts

All fasteners should have a washer under the turned element. In this case, the bolt head. I am surprised washers were not present when you removed the old bolts. Maybe left off from an earlier pump swap? Not sure if washers show in the shop manual or not. This is especially true when using stainless fasteners for any part. Stainless flat washers let the bolt head turn on the washer without digging in to the softer aluminum pump. You mentioned anti seize. It is important to use this on all stainless fastener threads, even for a temporary bolt installation. Before screwing in a stainless bolt, coat it with anti seize. Even when using stainless bolts and nuts, these can gall and lock up without anti seize.

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NO CRANK SPROCKETS WERE MADE WITH AN ADVANCE OR RETARD BUILT IN. IT WAS BUILT INTO THE CAMSHAFT WHEN MANUFACTURED!!!! 

IF you use the shorter bolt in the A/C bracket it will have 1/4" less threads to BITE into the bolt & could pull the threads. USE THE CORRECT 1/4 " LONGER BOLT BEFORE YOU CAUSE YOURSELF MORE PROBLEMS!!!!

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The only way to actually check for cam advance or retard is to measure the respective cam lifts at the split overlap cycle position (this occurs on the exhaust cycle). At zero advance or retard, the exhaust and intake lifts will be identical. I would do this with a dial indicators on the valve springs. This of course assumes equal intake and exhaust lift. Not sure what the nailhead had for lift.

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5 hours ago, SwedeDownUnderR63 said:

Hi Ed,

Great info about the A/C parts.

 

I am still somewhat confused regarding the sprocket. Mine is markt S276R9 (no brand name) while the standard crank sprockets at Rockauto are either called S276 or have a number ending in 276 and they are the same for both 401 and 425 (in 1963). The one from Cloyes as an example has an OEM partnumber of 1173853 which corresponds to the number in the Buick Master Parts Book for 4700 in 1963. I can only guess that the S276 already is set with the correct degrees built into it (as you hinted above).

Wouldn't it then make sense that the S276R9 that I have already have the standard original degrees (5 I guess in this case)  built in at the "0" location and the alternatives are then advances or retards from that position? Maybe I should try to call Russ...

 

Not on anything aftermarket.  0 is 0.  5 is 5.  etc.  This sprocket may fit other applications other than a nailhead.  You can use the neoprene from seal from a different Buick engine on a nailhead so there's no reason the front sprocket couldn't be shared.  Call Russ.

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                          To eliminate all the confusion, just buy a stock lower gear so you eliminate the possibility of screwing up.You aren't going drag racing

so you don't need a gear with all those keyways on it.

Be sure to note that the torque on the harmonic balancer bolt is in the stratosphere, something like 250 foot lbs. If you don't

torque that bolt properly the balancer will vibrate loose, destroying the balancer and possibly the nose of the crankshaft.

Edited by Seafoam65 (see edit history)

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I think that found the same timing set on the TA Performance website.  Looks the same, described the same.  You might want to give them a call and verify how the cam sprocket is built.  In the description of some of their products, they say that 4° advance is built in, but that description is not used on all of their products.  

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All: 

I have sent of a question to Russ Martin and I will follow it up with a call if needed. I do think the attached picture of the settings for both sprockets is a correct match to the stock setting.

I do appreciate all of your advice, any confusion is likely to be coming from me.

  • Winston/Seafoam65: you are probably correct in that I should have gone with a basic setup but this can't be impossible even for an IT nerd like me. Yes, I am aware of the torque on the harmonic balancer bolt. It is 200-220 in the manual and Russ Martin recommends 220 which is what I will use, I just wish that I was stronger as this is likely to be a test .
  • Steve/steelman: Correct, there where no washers in use with the "original" bolts. I will use it with the new SS bolts + anti seize.
  • Tom/telriv: Bolt in the A/C bracket. The front passenger side header bolt was already in use to hold the none-A/C bracket the same way as the "new" A/C bracket is to be hold. Both bracket has ~8mm (~5/16) that the bolt goes through so if it was bad before this will not make any difference except for the additional weight/force that the A/C is possible will have on the bolt. In any case I have measured the length of the existing bolt to be 115mm or ~4 1/2 inch and also asked Russ for advice or possible suggestion on another bolt to use if needed. Maybe I should read Russ advice that follows such that all 63-64 Riviera (both A/C and none-A/C) already have the correct length bolt wilts other none-A/C Buick of those years don't: "some cars like  63-64 Riviera and all 1965-66 401-425 with AC use a special head bolt that is about 1/4" longer on the front passenger side, the bolt goes through the ALT/AC compressor bracket and into the head. "
  • Ed/RivNut: I do agree that the timing chain set that I got from Russ looks like the same as the  TA Performance set. If I look at the info at http://www.taperformance.com/proddetail.asp?prod=TA_1522NH9KEY  (which isn't the same set as the one, TA_1524NH, that I think I have but the principle must be the same) the setting in attached picture should give me the "0" setting especially as, per telriv above,: "NO CRANK SPROCKETS WERE MADE WITH AN ADVANCE OR RETARD BUILT IN. IT WAS BUILT INTO THE CAMSHAFT WHEN MANUFACTURED!!!!" Anyhow, I have raised the question with Russ.

 

TA Performance multi-key way timing set.png

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On ‎2‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 6:46 AM, telriv said:

NO CRANK SPROCKETS WERE MADE WITH AN ADVANCE OR RETARD BUILT IN. IT WAS BUILT INTO THE CAMSHAFT WHEN MANUFACTURED!!!! 

IF you use the shorter bolt in the A/C bracket it will have 1/4" less threads to BITE into the bolt & could pull the threads. USE THE CORRECT 1/4 " LONGER BOLT BEFORE YOU CAUSE YOURSELF MORE PROBLEMS!!!!

 

This. I went through all of this with a SBC I had 20 years ago. The different keyways are just there to allow you the option of experimenting with different timing in performance builds. I put in 5 advanced on my SBC, and it was too much because the Performer cam already had something like 8 degrees advance built in compared to stock. Conversely, I put in 5 degrees retarded on my SBF to give it a little more torque. I later put it back to 0 when I was trying to figure out a engine issue. It was a noticeable difference, but barely.

 

When in doubt, put it at 0 straight up, and she'll be fine.

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I'm not sure about the Buick engine but the Pontiac engine was zero tolerance. Pontiac used a cam gear coated with plastic when that let go (which was all to often) the pistons hit the valves bending the valves. Line the cam and crank up before you take the gears off and install the new gears the same way. If you want to play with duration and lift do it with the cam. Off setting the cam with the crank will bring you a lot of trouble. Also if my memory serves me correctly the only difference between an A/C pump and a non A/C punp is the shaft. The A/C pump is longer so the two belt pulley will clear the pump housing.

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41 minutes ago, retiredmechanic74 said:

I'm not sure about the Buick engine but the Pontiac engine was zero tolerance. Pontiac used a cam gear coated with plastic when that let go (which was all to often) the pistons hit the valves bending the valves. Line the cam and crank up before you take the gears off and install the new gears the same way. If you want to play with duration and lift do it with the cam. Off setting the cam with the crank will bring you a lot of trouble. Also if my memory serves me correctly the only difference between an A/C pump and a non A/C punp is the shaft. The A/C pump is longer so the two belt pulley will clear the pump housing.

Perhaps on the ever present SBC, but on a 401/425 Buick nailhead the only difference between the a/c and non-a/c pumps is the number of impellers; 3 on the non-a/c pump, 5 on the a/c pump.  That'd applies year to year.  These are differnent pumps for different years. 

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1 hour ago, RivNut said:

Perhaps on the ever present SBC, but on a 401/425 Buick nailhead the only difference between the a/c and non-a/c pumps is the number of impellers; 3 on the non-a/c pump, 5 on the a/c pump.  That'd applies year to year.  These are differnent pumps for different years. 

It seems to me that I ran into that problem once. The parts co. gave me the wrong pump (non A/C) and when I got to the point of installing the pulley it scraped??? So many years ago how time fly's. He might want to check the length of the shaft just in case.   

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20 hours ago, SwedeDownUnderR63 said:

All: 

I have sent of a question to Russ Martin and I will follow it up with a call if needed. I do think the attached picture of the settings for both sprockets is a correct match to the stock setting.

I do appreciate all of your advice, any confusion is likely to be coming from me.

  • Winston/Seafoam65: you are probably correct in that I should have gone with a basic setup but this can't be impossible even for an IT nerd like me. Yes, I am aware of the torque on the harmonic balancer bolt. It is 200-220 in the manual and Russ Martin recommends 220 which is what I will use, I just wish that I was stronger as this is likely to be a test .
  • Steve/steelman: Correct, there where no washers in use with the "original" bolts. I will use it with the new SS bolts + anti seize.
  • Tom/telriv: Bolt in the A/C bracket. The front passenger side header bolt was already in use to hold the none-A/C bracket the same way as the "new" A/C bracket is to be hold. Both bracket has ~8mm (~5/16) that the bolt goes through so if it was bad before this will not make any difference except for the additional weight/force that the A/C is possible will have on the bolt. In any case I have measured the length of the existing bolt to be 115mm or ~4 1/2 inch and also asked Russ for advice or possible suggestion on another bolt to use if needed. Maybe I should read Russ advice that follows such that all 63-64 Riviera (both A/C and none-A/C) already have the correct length bolt wilts other none-A/C Buick of those years don't: "some cars like  63-64 Riviera and all 1965-66 401-425 with AC use a special head bolt that is about 1/4" longer on the front passenger side, the bolt goes through the ALT/AC compressor bracket and into the head. "
  • Ed/RivNut: I do agree that the timing chain set that I got from Russ looks like the same as the  TA Performance set. If I look at the info at http://www.taperformance.com/proddetail.asp?prod=TA_1522NH9KEY  (which isn't the same set as the one, TA_1524NH, that I think I have but the principle must be the same) the setting in attached picture should give me the "0" setting especially as, per telriv above,: "NO CRANK SPROCKETS WERE MADE WITH AN ADVANCE OR RETARD BUILT IN. IT WAS BUILT INTO THE CAMSHAFT WHEN MANUFACTURED!!!!" Anyhow, I have raised the question with Russ.

 

TA Performance multi-key way timing set.png

 

Some feedback:

This has been interesting although somewhat time consuming. Time to put the parts back. Thanks for all feedback.

 

BTW does anyone have a two groove pulley for the alternator to sell?

 

head bolts.png

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