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MochetVelo

PA Y.O.M. Plates: Condition?

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This is the link to the application form:

http://www.dot.state.pa.us/Public/DVSPubsForms/BMV/BMV%20Forms/mv-11V.pdf

 

It looks like you need to take a picture of the plate and send that in.  They probably make a determination of the legibility of an unrestored plate.  There is a number on the form. You could always call and ask, then post what you learned.

Scott

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My plates are legible, but not perfect. They have a few extra holes, and the paint has some alligatoring and stains. They were approved by PennDOT, however, and are now on my Model T. The application instructions were a bit confusing. It turned out I needed to send them my title, my insurance card, the application form and $201 ($51 "Title Fee", $75 YOM plate fee, $75 license plate fee). They returned my title, luckily.

 

Phil

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Wow, what a pain.  In Michigan all I had to do was to take a picture of the plate, photocopy the title and insurance and send in $35.  Got my YOM registration certificate 7 days later.

Scott

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Yes Phil is correct on the fees.  One week ago I registered my 1964 Vespa Scooter as an antique with a YOM plate.

 

For a YOM plate, remember to go to the PennDOT website and do a number search to verify the number is not already used on another vehicle since PennDOT will do a search and reject the plate if it duplicates a plate already in use.

 

The pain depends on where you live in PA.

 

I live 20 minutes from the PennDOT headquarters building located in Harrisburg and always handle my title and license plate issues there.

 

No photo required if you go to the HQ with the YOM plate and they have an opportunity to look at it.

 

Another thing to remember is no Notary required for any title transfers if both the seller and buyer go in and do the change at the PennDOT HQ building.

 

Stude Light, is the $35 include the title, permanent plate with no annual registration fees, and no inspection requirement for the life of the car like we have in PA?

Edited by Vila (see edit history)

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I don't see the Y.O.M. plate program being very popular

in Pennsylvania.  What do others see?

 

When the law was passed, license plate sellers tended

to increase their prices, anticipating higher demand.

The typical late 1950's plate or 1960's plate that was $5 to $7

was often seen at $15.

 

I wouldn't be surprised that the high cost to register the plate

is keeping participation low.  Most Penna. old-car owners

display antique plates on the front of their car instead,

in a space that otherwise would be vacant--and where there's no cost!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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 I got my two plates both were poor condition .Made them look best I could , touch up some chips , closed a few hole back and WD'ed to give some shine .,and photo-ed .  The cost is $ 75 for life of , other cost of 51 and 75 where required regardless , on new transfers and plate . However these may not be eligible for transfer to other vehicle of different year . But can follow to different owner .  

20160322_143327.jpg

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Since the Year of Manufacture registration program is only 4 years old in PA, I don't believe it is well know in PA.  

 

I put YOM plates on all my eligible antique cars and scooter within one month of the program going into effect, and every time I take one to a car show I am asks if it is legal or how you go about registering a car with a YOM plate by other antique car owners.

 

I got a like new plate for may 1962 Triumph TR4 several years before the program took effect, and saved some money over when the plates increased due to the YOM program.

100_0507 2.JPG

Edited by Vila (see edit history)

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PA antique tags went from purple to horrible looking IMO. I have a friend who covered his antique tag car picture with a Union Jack sticker for his Triumph. Hasn't gotten in trouble for it over several years now to my knowledge. YOM is a new program and I think it's a great. When I get my '54 on the road I'll be going that direction. AACA judging wise, you may get dinged for condition if you have an unrestored plate, but I'd take the hit (or remove the tag) just to have what I think is a better look and historical piece.

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On 4/1/2016 at 8:08 PM, MochetVelo said:

...It turned out I needed to send them my title, my insurance card, the application form and $201 ($51 "Title Fee", $75 YOM plate fee, $75 license plate fee)....

 

I think the Pennsylvania program is 'way overpriced.

The legislature must have thought they could make good money

from those "well-heeled" car collectors.  For that reason, I believe,

it is not very popular.

 

In other aspects of antique-car ownership, Pennsylvania is very car-friendly.

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Massachusetts allows YOM plates if they pass visible inspection at a registry office.  It pays to smile sweetly and grovel when presenting a less-than-perfect plate, but I have gotten some sketchy plates accepted.  While it is not currently legal to alter or repaint a plate after acceptance by the RMV, it might just happen once in a while since the plates never get inspected again, not that I would know anything about that.  We do have hope that a current bill in the state legislature may make it legal to repair and repaint old plates.  Here are the words from Massachusetts Senate Bill S 1830:

 

SECTION 1. Notwithstanding any general or special law or regulation to the contrary, section 6 of chapter 90 of the general laws, as appearing in the 2012 official edition, shall be amended by inserting after the word “section” in line 40 the following: - “However, the restoration of year of manufacture registration plates, painted and restored to their original year of manufacture colors and design, will not be considered altering such registration plates when used on antique automobiles.”

 

Unfortunately, this bill has been traveling very slowly through the process and is currently awaiting Senate action after being approved by the House and sent to a Senate committee in March, 2016.  Is there something political about such a bill that isn't obvious to me?   We should get car clubs across the country to push for legislation to allow restored YOM plates.  Incidentally, there is another bill in (slow) process to permit the use of only one plate at the rear for all types of plates used on antique cars.  Presently, only one YOM plate is needed.

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everything is expensive in Pa! Gas is going up another 8 cents for tax just after an increase this weekend. All vehicle registrations went up too and will do the same in the future. Pa has a law that mandates only one plate per vehicle making all front plates, even decorative plates illegal, although I've never heard of anyone being picked up for using a front mount plate.I was told this by a state trooper. I think that the YOM plates are an interesting addition to an old vehicle but I do think they overcharge for the service.

 

 

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On 12/31/2016 at 9:56 PM, Larry Schramm said:

Effective tomorrow January 2, 2017 in Michigan the gas tax is going up 7cents/gallon and the registration on vehicles is going up 20%.

 

All the more reason to go with YOM in Michigan before that program gets eliminated or overpriced. There are some restrictions though so you can't do this for your daily driver.

 

On 4/6/2016 at 5:44 PM, Vila said:

Stude Light, is the $35 include the title, permanent plate with no annual registration fees, and no inspection requirement for the life of the car like we have in PA?

 

The $35 is for a permanent registration only...no annual registration fees. Although we should probably adopt inspections in Michigan, due to all the barely roadworthy vehicles we have running around here, we currently do not have the vehicle inspection requirement in Michigan.

Scott

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Michigan used to have vehicle inspections and discontinued them as in the big picture were found to not be that effective. 

 

Same goes for the emission inspections in SE Michigan. The emissions inspections only covered cars less than 10 years old and exempted low income/ public assistance, etc so the only cars being checked were new cars.

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Going off topic:

I recall the emission inspections in SE Michigan. 

I'm sure a lot of folks will not like what I have to say....I really think that Michigan would benefit with an annual inspection program like PA has.  I've spent plenty of time driving in both states and you just don't see the non-roadworthy cars driving in PA that you see in MI.  Cars missing body panels, exhaust pipes, mufflers, bald tires, worn out shocks, worn out ball joints, bumpers held on with bungee cords, missing tail lights, missing headlamps or low beams burned out, missing glass covered by plastic and duct tape, missing doors, dog tracking, and the list goes on and on. This would all have to be repaired with an inspection program. I get nervous driving near some of these cars and trucks.  I know it's a pain for the PA residents and sometimes it just seems like another government money making program but it does have a benefit.

Scott

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13 hours ago, Stude Light said:

Going off topic:

I recall the emission inspections in SE Michigan. 

I'm sure a lot of folks will not like what I have to say....I really think that Michigan would benefit with an annual inspection program like PA has.  I've spent plenty of time driving in both states and you just don't see the non-roadworthy cars driving in PA that you see in MI.  Cars missing body panels, exhaust pipes, mufflers, bald tires, worn out shocks, worn out ball joints, bumpers held on with bungee cords, missing tail lights, missing headlamps or low beams burned out, missing glass covered by plastic and duct tape, missing doors, dog tracking, and the list goes on and on. This would all have to be repaired with an inspection program. I get nervous driving near some of these cars and trucks.  I know it's a pain for the PA residents and sometimes it just seems like another government money making program but it does have a benefit.

Scott

 

The benefit does not outweigh  the cost.  In PA is seems like every time you take a vehicle in for inspection it will either need brakes or shocks or something.  Very costly to the consumer and not that much benefit.

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I'm cheating the system, sort of............on my '68 AMX I have the Official Antique PA State Tag, with registration, on the rear bumper, but I put a Period Correct Tag on the front bumper, unregistered at no cost. PA does not require a front tag so no law is broken. I think there's no requirement preventing doing this. 

 

PA Antique registered cars are exempt of all Annual, Inspections, Tag and Registration Renewal. Usage is supposed to be restricted to driving not more then one day a week but I have never seen this enforced, or figured out how it could be. Maybe, it could also mean we're suppose to drive them one day a week, which would be hardly likely. 

Edited by Doug Novak (see edit history)

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