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jrbartlett

Seeking to Buy a Trailer

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Looking for a 24-28-foot tag trailer with 12,000 pound GVWR, 7 1/2-foot interior height and driver-side exit door over the wheels. Might also consider a goose-neck. Anyone have anything?

 

 

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Your gonna have to have one built. Most trailers are way under the 12k, I just bought a great trailer, with your cars this is what you should consider. Much safer and the extra brakes are also very nice.

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No, anything under 26,000 is good to go. Buy the best truck you can a one ton dually is best. A long chassis is more stable than a short one. I will never go back to a dual axle set up. Too many tire problems. The triple spread is great, and stopping is MUCH better than the double set up.

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James, you need one like mine - all aluminum, pair of 6,000# axles - extra height - driver side extra long door built awning style so varied cars can all open door into access door - extra lights in floor and walls for easier tie-down in the dark - multiple tie-downs - raised floor so fender wells are low enough for '54 Caddy doors to open over the wheel box and the access door lip - electric tongue jack and winch - beavertail - reinforced ramp - all metal floor (too much humidity in our part of the country, and don't need wood rot

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On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2015 at 8:45 PM, edinmass said:

No, anything under 26,000 is good to go

There are two issues:  (1) what's the max your TRUCK can tow, and (2) what YOU may tow given your level of driver's license.

 

Ed, in Calif an Class C (passenger vehicle) license holder operating a vehicle under 26K GVW (includes many motor homes) may TOW a vehicle up to, but less than, 10,000 GVW.  Any trailer over 10K GVW requires  a higher-level license, specifically a Class A NON-commercial or commercial license.

 

That said, apparently an original purchaser of a new trailer can get the manufacturer to downrate the trailer on its DOT label.  Last summer I bought at auction a super-tall (roof is 11'3" AGL) triple-axle tag trailer that I call Big Fugly--24' full-width box + 4 ft of length in pointed nose, 30 ft overall including tongue, with three 5,200-lb Dexter axles under it.  The official DOT label shows a GVW of 9,990 lbs and is cleverly hidden on the inside of the tongue in a position where one has to crawl under the trailer to read it.  So I photographed the label, printed the photo, and put it in a document protector taped to an inside wall for CHP inspection, if necessary.  The registration (not the label) shows the TARE as 3,000 lbs, which is nonsense.  Not the most wonderful trailer but cheap enough for my limited needs and resources.  It does tow surprisingly well.

 

It came with 6-lug 15" wheels, and I lost one of the Chinese-made ST tires on the way home; thankfully I brought a spare.  After measuring clearances, I replaced the wheels with 16-inch and tires with US-made LT 10-ply with even greater capacity.  The LTs ride harder but really noticeable only when its empty.  I haven't summoned the nerve to weigh the SOB yet, but it's heavy and I'm likely overgrossed--in the Real World--with the 1918 Pierce in it, but that's what THIS trailer is for.

 

I tow with a 1999 Ford F-350 7.3L diesel dually which I bought new and which has a GCVW (truck +  contents + trailer + contents) of 20,000 lbs.  This hasn't been my daily driver for 15 years, and will last as long as I'm able to tow.  I know Ed tows with a (much) newer Ford dually, and newer COMBINED weights are somewhere about 26,000 lbs.  But the prime mover itself is about 7,500 lbs, which must be subtracted from the combined rating of the tow vehicle to determine the allowed towed load.

Edited by Grimy
correct typos, add info (see edit history)

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Grimy

Maryland laws sound very similar to CA in regards to trailers and towing.  But there is one significant difference.  Maryland requires all vehicles over 10,000 pounds GCVW to stop at scale houses.  I have even had them come out and run me down when I missed them!  Other difference is on a 10,000 GVW trailer a class (A) non commercial license AND a CDL medical card is now required.

Are you sure you did the math on the GCVW correctly.  The GVW of a one ton dually is about 15,000 pounds.  Your stacker trailer is actually a 15,000 GVW unit (3-5,200 pound axles) making your GCVW 30,000 pounds. Busted big time over 26,000 federal non commercial!  Gonna cost you big time in Maryland as they are going to know triple axle 5,200 units equal 15,000 GVW regardless of what the tag says.  Are you sure your tag isn't a replacement or a misprint stating two 5,200 axles?  I have never seen a trailer tag "downrated"

Robert 

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On 7/16/2015 at 5:44 PM, jrbartlett said:

Looking for a 24-28-foot tag trailer with 12,000 pound GVWR, 7 1/2-foot interior height and driver-side exit door over the wheels. Might also consider a goose-neck. Anyone have anything?

 

 

 

I missed your question a year or so ago.  Just get any trailer you can find and put 6,000 pound axles under it like Marty's.  The good news is your tag will probably say 7,000 or 9,990 pounds.  Very few inspectors will know the difference between a 5,200 and 6,000 axle.  That way even if towing with a 3/4 or most one ton trucks your tag GCVW math will be a tick under the magic 26,000 number

Robert

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1 hour ago, Robert Street said:

Maryland laws sound very similar to CA in regards to trailers and towing.  But there is one significant difference.  Maryland requires all vehicles over 10,000 pounds GCVW to stop at scale houses.  I have even had them come out and run me down when I missed them!  Other difference is on a 10,000 GVW trailer a class (A) non commercial license AND a CDL medical card is now required.

Are you sure you did the math on the GCVW correctly.  The GVW of a one ton dually is about 15,000 pounds.  Your stacker trailer is actually a 15,000 GVW unit (3-5,200 pound axles) making your GCVW 30,000 pounds. Busted big time over 26,000 federal non commercial!  Gonna cost you big time in Maryland as they are going to know triple axle 5,200 units equal 15,000 GVW regardless of what the tag says.  Are you sure your tag isn't a replacement or a misprint stating two 5,200 axles?  I have never seen a trailer tag "downrated"

Thanks, Robert.  I've heard many horror stories about MD re trailers; I'm glad I don't live there anymore (did live in Towson six months over 1966-67 and for two years 1969-71 while stationed at Ft. Holabird, but wasn't towing then).  I appreciate very much your information.

 

For everything other than the 1918, I use my TPD enclosed triple axle trailer (3 x Dexter 3500-lb axles) with 9.995-lb rating.  Only once has that rig been thru MD in 15 yrs of ownership, and then only thru the panhandle on I-81 (as I recall, I may be wrong) enroute from GA to Fairport, NY--without incident, and my real-world gross was slightly under 10K in the trailer.

 

For years I have carried in the trailer the CA DMV chart on the inside cover of the CA Commercial Driver's Handbook showing the numbers I cited in my previous post--but fortunately have never needed to show it.

 

Don't have a link right now, but if memory serves, my 1999 Ford F350 7.3L SC DRW (2WD, auto) has 13,500 GVW and 20,000 GCVW. TARE on the truck registration is 5990 (a lie, dealer entered "gas" as motive power which caused a smog check problem easily resolved by the code digit in the VIN) and real-world (at the dump) was 7430 with me and the small dog and usual OBE (on board eqpt).

 

My trailer is NOT a stacker. My 1918 Pierce is 7'8" tall with the (lined) top up (I leave it up at the urging of the high-end trimmer who did the car for the previous owner 30 yrs ago),  The APPEARANCE difference between Dexter 3500-lb axles and 5200-lb is 5 vs 6 lugs.  If I'm moving I don't think they can tell... :-)

 

When I get to the other computer I'll post photos of (1) Big Fugly the tall trailer and (2) its label.  I know the original (and only previous) owner who was a car collector and did not WANT to have a Class A license (either commercial or NON-) required for 10,000 and up.

 

I'd argue (and hope I don't have to) that the total of AXLE ratings does not necessarily equate to the rating of the entire trailer; frame, wheels, and springs are also factors.  I do like triple axle trailers for their stability, even though I buy more tires.

 

Are you saying that MD requires all COMBINATIONS exceeding 10,000 lbs to visit their scales?  In CA and almost anywhere else, non-commercial combinations (truck, trailer, and car-in-trailer are all in my name) can bypass scales without either the truck or trailer being so marked.  However, if you rent a small U-Haul box van, you MUST go thru the scales as it's a commercial vehicle.

 

I welcome the opportunity to discuss these anomalies so that all our brethren are aware.  I'm already willing to go an extra 500 miles to avoid MD!

 

VBR, George AKA Grimy 

 

 

 

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Grimy:  So you were at Ft Holabird when I was drafted in 70!!!  I haven't been back there since!!

there aren't any scale houses on I-81 that I recall.  The ones on I-70 if I am headed West have green lighted me every time also.  It is the ones on the smaller state roads like route 13 that give me a fit.  Yes, if you have a combined of 10,001 or higher you must stop in Maryland regardless of what you are.  They are really burning up the landscaper guys with tandem trailers. If fact in the true interpretation of the annotated codes the one ton pickups must stop in MD but I have never heard of that being enforced. At one scale house they were insisting I should be commercial and DOT registered because of towing with a one ton. Yes, if you are driving a lettered truck or landscaping trailer then you are considered commercial in Maryland and also must be DOT numbered and CDL and are really stopping them.  I have seen the same weight scale issue in a state out west while headed to the Cheyenne show last year. But it was about 30,000 GCVW I think so I flew by.  I am hearing PA is thinking about a weight for stopping at the scales as it is a real revenue maker around here. A couple of years ago the rigs leaving carlisle show were stopped but I think that was more for DOT registered if the trailer or the truck was commercially titled.

I also carry the Federal Commercial book with me as the federal laws clearly exempt cars shown for pleasure but in Maryland we are conveniently not in the exempt section but the Maryland book clearly indicates that Maryland adopted the entire Federal section so I have to play lawyer! 

Keep in mind those scale stops are not what you are carrying in the trailer but what your truck and trailer are placarded for.  Also at one of my stops I had an inspector take a paper pad and write down all the capacities on my tires and add them to ensure they exceed the manufacturers GVW tag.  Seems they have caught several with Walmart tires instead of higher load range tires!

I could go on more with my trailering issues.

I have heard that the Maryland DOT guys are starting to compare towing specs vs GVW of trailers!!  Not sure how they can do that as a tow rating isn't on the door placard.

Robert

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In 37 years of restoring and hauling cars to and from shows etc with our 3/4 ton Dodge Rams and 10,000 GVW trailer we have never stopped at a MD scale house. Our shop is 8 miles north of the MD-PA border so we are in MD a lot.

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14 hours ago, Robert Street said:

I am hearing PA is thinking about a weight for stopping at the scales as it is a real revenue maker around here. A couple of years ago the rigs leaving carlisle show were stopped but I think that was more for DOT registered if the trailer or the truck was commercially titled.

 

Be advised that at the local level (in my case township) here in Pennsylvania some township police forces conduct periodic DOT checks. These checks ARE NOT necessarily restricted to just commercial vehicles in some places. Where I live, they pull EVERY Truck towing any kind/size trailer in regardless of being commercial or not. In the township I live in in Eastern Pennsylvania they do these checks every month or so especially in warmer months. I have been pulled in (had No choice) on my way to Fall Hershey when I was towing my 20' car hauler (no commercial lettering on my truck or trailer).  They had me drive onto the scales and asked me to give them my license, truck & trailer registration and proof of insurance. They also checked the truck and trailer for current registration and state inspection stickers and asked me what I was hauling. For non-commercial rigs I suspect they are checking for current/correct paperwork and current inspections, etc more than anything else. If the state of Pennsylvania does have weight limits for non-commercial vehicles then the use of weight scales could get one into a jam if they are exceeding those limits. I run about 1,500 lbs under the 7K rating for my trailer so pulling onto the scales for me was no big deal.

 

BTW, a friend of mine who lives near Greencastle, PA (just north of the PA/MD border) was pulled over by a MD Trooper in MD when towing one of his trailers. When the trooper was checking his paperwork he looked at the plate on the side of the trailer for the trailer's info (weight, VIN #, etc). This plate had the VIN# printed on the plate (not engraved into the metal plate) which most newer trailers have. Due to sun/aging the VIN # had faded and was no longer readable. The MD trooper gave my friend a ticket because the VIN# was "missing". My friend called me to warn me about this since he knew my trailer had the same type of "printed" VIN# and I traveled on I-81 from PA/MD/VA when towing. I called the place where I bought the trailer and they were happy to send me a new, engraved plate with my trailer's VIN# on it (the printed VIN# on my plate had faded as well). My friend got an engraved, replacement plate as well. Moral of this story, check the plate on your trailer if the VIN# is faded/missing get a replacement plate unless you want to pay a ticket.

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Hi all. I live in Maryland just out side of Baltimore, I have a  Dually and a 3 axle

trailer. I have not ever stoped at a weight station or ben stopped for going by one. Now my trailer has living quarters so its really a RV.I have never seen a rv 

in the scale on 70 east or west bound.my registration for bouth is 30,000 lbs.

For my combination in MD you do need a class A licence or a CDL.l go by the scale about twice a month. My truck and trailer has NO signage .Its not Commercial and it all in my name

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yes, Gary RV's are exempt in MD and your rig is a gray area I believe so that might be the main reason why you haven't been stopped.   Actually our car trailers are exempt (if under 26,000 GCVW and trailer is under 10,000 GVW) via federal but we aren't exempt in the guide book of Maryland commercial license so that is why I carry the federal books and the section of MD law that adopted the Federal.

I have gone through the scales you mention and have always been green lighted. but, on the eastern shore much different and have had officers run me down and bring me back to scales.  I am now a model MD citizen and stop at all scales as required knowing on eastern shore I will face inspection or interrogation delays.

Robert

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