195354

1953 Convertibles project

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Here are a few Pictures of the trunk, the rusted floor is out and ready for the junk man.  The new floor and back panel is in making sure the trunk lid fits before welding in place.

 I used a frame from a parts car for support while the convert frame is out at the powder coating shop. This is about the end of major rust repair then the small damaged areas will up for repair. 

Steve

 

 

trunk floor removed.jpg

trunk floor cut.jpg

trunk and rear pan cut out.jpg

fitting trunk floor.jpg

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Took a rest working on the body for the weekend and worked on the axle housing. The right wheel bearing came out with ease couple of hits with the slide hammer and moved on the left side.  The axle bearing moved about a 1/8” and stuck. Tried my entire bag of tricks gave up removed rollers, and welded the race. This shrinks the bearing and it came out with ease. I have done this to the cup's in hubs at work on trucks makes them come out  easy, little trick I am passing on it saves a lot of work.  

Steve

rear axle bearing in houseing.jpg

rear xle bearing weld trick.jpg

rear axle bearing out.jpg

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Glad to see that you are back at it.  Does this particular car have personal history or is it a favorite?

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Ken I have been watching your project you are moving along and I see very nice work.  I wish my project would  go faster.  Ken keep posting pictures it helps keep me motivated when I am pulling my hair out.

 You asked if this was a favorite or personal history.

 I like Convertible’s My First car was a convertible purchased while I was in high school in 1972  it was a rough 1953 Belair convertible used more oil than gas I did drive it but  did the Muscle car thing most of the time as money permitted. Muscle cars came and went in my early years.  I had a 66 Skylark 4 speed  and had a few big block 4 speed Chevelles funny thing they would have engine failures on Saturday night. The 53 Chevy was my stand by it was ugly and smoked but it ran most days. I still drive the 53 Chevy soft top, I do not haul  parts in it anymore.  The Buick line bit me back in the day, a 1953 convertible with a V8 how could I go wrong. My Chevy 235 is fun but it does not need much work in the winter. I now have a project that will keep me busy for several years.   

Steve

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Here are a few pictures of one of the parts cars differential and torque tube also a picture of the diff housing from the convertible after tanking it.  From what I can tell these had no paint just a splattering of under coating the rear sway bar does not appear to have every been painted along with the lower control arms. I also see some smaller parts that did not have paint like the coil spring retainers that bolt to the diff housing.   Most of the pictures I see after work has been done show most everything black. Does anyone have any documentation from Buick, or possibly a disassembled car before restoration that shows the chassis detail what was painted, or not when assembled. I want to try to duplicate as close as I can.   I am ready for assembly other than paint on the chassis parts.  Any information regarding paint or plating on brake backing plates and shocks and other parts that bolt on will be a great help.   

Steve

diff under coat.jpg

diff houesing after dip.jpg

torque tube no paint.jpg

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I have been doing research regarding what color the torque tube and differential housing were when it left the factory, Most of my research is cleaning on my car and parts cars. I have been able to locate just a few pictures and they are black and white. These pictures do show a different color on the listed parts they are not black like the frame.

I have cleaned the torque tube and rear differential housing and a few other parts . Most of the parts below the floor have on the top half and rust on the bottom half, with no sign of paint on the bottom.  When I remove the under coating on top no sign of paint just clean steel. I have done this carefully so as not to disturb the paint. When I removed undercoating from other parts on my car the paint remained.  This is what I have found with no paint at this point. Rear differential housing, inspection cover is painted, rear sway bar no paint control arms on torque tube and lower coil spring retainers for the rear axle no paint. I would think these parts would have some type of rust inhibitor from the factory. If no rust inhibitor applied on these parts, was this just a way that the dealer could upsell undercoating.

Has anyone found the same with the cars they have worked on, Black is the norm on restored cars from what I have seen. Here is a picture rear sway bar.

Thanks for any information provided.

Steve  

 

5aca79af20856_rearswaybarnopaint.thumb.jpg.d137e4e6ac3f0da3ad2623d15f3c8761.jpg

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Good questions.  I pulled a handfull of photos out for review and attached them below.  The first set are from the underside of a 1940 Buick that saw service in the Detroit area then the Massachusets Cape (Cape Cod).  This car is largely unmolested by any restoration or major dissassembly.  I'm guessing, but even in the 40's northern states used salt.  You can see where this car was undercoated on almost every surface, which would be likely given the northern environment.  The Cape is a sandy environment and back in the 40's may have also salted, but I would guess had many unpaved roads.  Regarding a sandy environment, my uncle was a mail carrier is rural south GA back in the 70's and drove mostly sandy roads.  The bottom of his car looked like clean, sand blasted shiney steel.  As a hunch (pure guess), I would think that the manufacturer would paint the metal after fabrication and before assembly just to keep flash rust down to a minimum.  I would further assume that any buyer would have second thoughts looking at a brand new car with any rust on the undercarraige.   

 

Behind the front wheel looking inside the fender:

IMG_6436.thumb.JPG.c14a4e7c6575290ec79f442e3a981342.JPG

 

Loooking up towards the floor mounted dimmer switch:

IMG_6443.thumb.JPG.40db220b0df878429d06cd06681d6ee9.JPG

 

This is the trailing edge of a body mount and could be paint.  The trailing edges would likely see less blasting from the forward motion on dirt/sandy roads.

IMG_6465.thumb.JPG.33499e6e9e7b92ab8f6063b528011dd0.JPG

 

If the bottom of the car was undercoated, the wires would also be coated.  I see what looks like black coloring on adjacent metal surfaces.

IMG_6468.thumb.JPG.e77538952cce20184599cfe85255fd11.JPG

 

In this photo, I see black surfaces that do not look like undecoating.  It could be tht the undercoating flaked off.  The undercoating frequently used in that period would be an asphaltic material.  As the undercoating dried out from voc loss, it became hard and would could lose its bond to the metal.  Old undercoating and metal expand and contract at different rates through temperature change, causing debonding.

IMG_6470.thumb.JPG.ab23d6efb62017a6c66082f5d284997a.JPG

 

 

At some point in the history of any car, oil leaks occured, coating the steel and preserving the steel from rust.  In the photo below I see black colored steel on the trailing arms of the drive train as well as oil staining.  I could understand some undercoat overspray on non-sheet metal body parts.  This part does not appear to have undercoating but appears to have a black color that is in part the oil, but could be residual paint.IMG_6472.thumb.JPG.b84590f6445abbd772ed748b6aafe9cd.JPG

 

The following photos are also from a 1940 model Buick that was lighty restored about 25 to 30 years ago.  It was apparent when examining this car that the restorer spray painted black on accessible surfaces under the car.  The car was repainted as well and portions of the front clip removed to repaint the frame.  This car has original wiring and none of it displays paint overspray.  The photo below shows the dimmer switch with body color overspray.  This car was never undercoated.  From this photo as well, you can see remains of a black color on some of the undercarrage steel.

IMG_6199.thumb.JPG.d2c501c762bd5a281e5e74914c2127bf.JPG

 

 

In the photo below it is apparent that the front clip was re-assembled after the restorer detail the frame, but then painted body color on the underside of the fenders.  The bolt that was removed in the photo below displays a black color that would have been preserved from road exposure and the later repaint.IMG_6231.thumb.JPG.eca9e90e0874a7033d6e499da812e9ad.JPG

 

I'm going to guess that the underside, non-consumer observed parts of these cars were painted black.  I've heard others state that frames would have been painted semi gloss and would further surmise that the vendors providing parts used similar paint though the gloss ma have varied.

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Ken thanks for the information and pictures.

On my parts cars  the fenders and floor,  had paint or primer under coating added to the floor and the inner fender,  My research shows no paint on the torque tube and differential housing and a few other parts. My guess is the steel might have been coated with rust preventative oils or pre-lubes for heavily drawn steel this could have been left to slow rust until under coated or the unit is sold. This is my guess anyway with no color pictures from the assembly lines and just parts I have access to.

Ken you are going to have a nice 40 when you are done I have been watching your progress.

I am working on repairing the lower windshield and cowl area; I have removed a solid cowl and lower window frame from my parts car. I have a few pictures, drilling the spot welds is not too bad, this weekend I hope start installing it.   

Steve

 

 

cowl from parts car.jpg

cowl before repair.jpg

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Slow going on my project been doing yard work and the list that never ends when you own a home.   Fired up the engine on my test stand and broke it in, thought I had low oil pressure at idle but it is fine, no oil or coolant leaks, surfacing the exhaust manifolds paid off no leaks in this area. Few details on the engine and it will be ready for install. Frame is back and ready for parts and pieces. The parts cleaning and paint does take time.  I hope to have a driving chassis this fall if the projects outside are under control.  Here are a few pictures of the progress to date.  

frame after powder.jpg

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Working on one of the small details on my 1953 V8 it has a timing cover and I am lucky enough to have the cover, it is hard to tell the correct color. The one I have is painted green; does anyone have a picture of the cover I believe they were black black back in 1953

Thanks for the help

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

314471256_timingcover.jpg.7e42d4c6b47472de6420e44e15b53582.jpg1903275821_timingcoverinplace.jpg.81c791d504b4d5e1d151fb50b2afb5db.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On ‎6‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 11:59 PM, 195354 said:

few more pictures  

 

1434493936_enginewithAF(2).jpg.8d028a7a5d9ccaab655ff4a3cec11ddf.jpg

 

Did you use the paper gasket for the oil filter housing?  Or did you find a stamped steel one?  If the paper, does it seem to be holding well?

 

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John I used a paper gasket on the oil filter housing to block no leaks to date. I have had three heat cycles and not a drop of oil.  

Chris I have not bent over the French locks yet will re-torque manifolds and bend them over. I did have the manifolds surfaced,  nice and quiet when running I hate exhaust leaks.   

 

I did have a very small gas leak on my filter at the carburetor; I pulled apart a different filter and installed a Buna O-ring inside should work I did check for leaks with vacuum and no leaks.  Will try it and see if it seals.  If someone has info on a seal or O-ring on this type of filter please let me know. Here are two pictures of the Moraine filter I did not take a picture of the filter or O-ring 

Steve

fuel filter 1.jpg

fuel filter 2.jpg

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