Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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If those wood pieces are like my 1931 pieces, they are covered with hardened drive line grease, oil and transmission fluid and probably not asphalt roofing stuff.

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You may be correct on that.  It’s a mess, whatever the gunk is!  I always assumed it was some sort of protective coating, but the more I think about it, the more I think you’re right.  I should have learned by now - never assume anything when you’re restoring a car.

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Maaaybe, but that stuff was so evenly coated on most of the underside that I always assumed (like you) that it was some sort of aftermarket undercoating.

 

Usually stuff from a leak shows a pattern originating from the source.

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You both may be correct.  Phil is correct, the stuff is evenly coated and rock hard.  But the concave metal plate screwed to the rear-most floorboard is loaded with grease, that also splattered over some of the floorboard.  This deposit appears to have been donated by a leaking differential, or, possibly, the rear ball joint.  So, keiser31 may be correct, also.  Either way, it’s a mess.

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Got the three rear most floorboards cut out and routed the edges.  The rear floorboard has the mounting holes drilled and the cutout for the differential plate.

 

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The attaching edges are routed for an overlapping fit.  I still haven't sanded the edges, cut out the battery access, or cleaned things up.

 

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The routing was done on my Bosch router table.  I was worried about tear-out on the plywood, but I got very clean cuts on all the boards.

 

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Each floorboard has a mounting pad made of wood, and attached to each short end, that rests on the top of the frame rail.  The wood is 1-1/8" thick, three inches and a quarter inches wide, and the length of the floorboard.

Getting lumber of that dimension proved impossible.  Rather than having a sawmill plane it for me, I bought some oak from a big box store and glued two pieces together.

 

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This gives me a chunk of wood 1-1/4" thick and 3-1/2 wide.  I'll use my router to knock off an eight of an inch of the thickness and a quarter inch off the width, and then I can cut the resulting stock to the correct lengths.

I should have everything wrapped up by tomorrow evening.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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The results are in, the Stat-O-Seal washers did the job on my leaking brake connections.  Once I installed them, the leaking stopped - period.  Not a drop of fluid anywhere.  They are a combination crush washer and rubber seal.  Don't get the steel variety, get the aluminum, as they act as a crush washer and rubber seal.  I got mine from Speedway Motors.  I needed two sizes, one for the outer part of the banjo bolt and the other for the threaded section.

 

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I also got most of the floor spacers done for the floorboards.  They rest on the frame and keep the actual floorboards at the correct level.

 

Here you can see the old and the new.  The holes in the old piece are there to clear rivets and bolts on the frame.  I haven't drilled them yet on the new spacers.

 

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Sitting in place on the bottom of the floorboards.

 

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The old floorboards before I removed them from the car.

 

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And the new ones partially finished.

 

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