Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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My Dad died @ 48 -heart attack; I'm 78: Do not smoke, get your LDL(bad) cholesterol below 70 and BP less than 140/90. Take a statin and an aspirin daily. This is all easily done and safe,  your Dodge deserves it!  Jusr see  your MD. (I'm one).    JLT

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Hi John,

LDL is well below 70. BP is excellent and I've been taking the two meds you mentioned for 5 years now.

Hopefully I'll outlive all my mates who smoke and drink.....well smoke anyway !

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You can reduce your LDL significantly without statins by removing all animal fat from your diet, particularly saturated fat. This includes eggs, red meat, cheese and so on.

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Hey guys, it's my knee that went bad.  Thanks for the medical advice, but I obviously have to start posting something about restoring my car before this turns into General Hospital.😄😄

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Sitting around, waiting for my knee to heal, I dug out some photos of Daphne through the years of her restoration.  I have to admit that the difference between the first photo ( the day I first saw her after 45 years and the last photo (a few months ago, before I installed the bumpers) is pretty remarkable.  I'm heading out into the garage for the first time in many months to start working on her again.  I'm still hobbling around, but I can actually move enough to work on the car.  I won't make the national meet in Green Bay this year as i hoped, but the Lake of the Ozarks Meet in 2019 is my goal.

 

5ac8f2edf0304_Prog4.thumb.jpg.3f5f8f5ed698e694f7f98a8cab73f77d.jpg

 

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5ac8f2ef76cf9_Prog1.thumb.jpg.7aeebb1254e1e39e26ee8156618c6421.jpg

 

 

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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On 3/13/2018 at 8:08 AM, Taylormade said:

Hey guys, it's my knee that went bad.  Thanks for the medical advice, but I obviously have to start posting something about restoring my car before this turns into General Hospital.😄😄

It hurts when I do this,,    Stop doing that,,,,free physical,,,,,

 

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That '32 is looking SOOOOO nice! Looking forward to you getting better and finishing that car. Nope....we're not too demanding. Not us....

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So I’m back at work on Daphne.  The first thing I noticed were nearly all the nuts and bolts around the tranny and the handbrake had rusted to a rich golden brown.  I spend two days cleaning them up and painting them.  No big deal, except after I put the car up on stands I discovered a puddle of oil under the transmission.  The leak that I thought I’d finally fixed last summer has returned with a vengeance.  The oil is coming out around the shafts in the tranny.  I thought I had sealed them up, but I was wrong.  So out comes the tranny for the third time.   This time I’m going to see if there is enough room to drive a freeze/casting plug into the shaft opening, providing I can find one with the correct diameter.  I can’t understand why the trans was designed this way.  It wouldn’t have been that hard to leave the rear shaft openings closed at the back of the transmission.  Anyway, back to the drawing board.

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I had that trouble with a Model A tranny, that had the reverse gear shaft that extended from the rear and was locked with a bolt and plate. Always leaked. I removed the shaft , cleaned it and replaced it using Permatex Quick Metal sealant and never had any more trouble. It's designed to fill small voids in shafts and metal parts. Good luck. If your tranny bolts were stainless, and if you remove the head markings like I do, you will discover that anything less than 316 grade stainless will rust slightly if the heads were shaved with a file or any steel has come in contact with them. The tiny steel particles  get imbedded in the stainless causing it to get that light rust cast to it. It's best to sand the heads with emory paper and WD 40. Good luck, leaks are a real pain! Hope you're feeling better too! I've been done for the last 10 months with a broken femur and hip! Just started to get back to my '36 dodge!

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Unfortunately, I used the Permatex Quick Metal Sealer during the last go around.  That’s why I thought I had the problem solved.  As to the bolt, all my bolts have the DB logo stamped on them and I’m trying to keep things as original as possible.  My knee problem seems minuscule next to your injuries.  Glad you’re back on your feet.

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Of all aspects of this restoration, the transmission has proven to be the biggest problem - so far.  From a chipped gear tooth, to shot bearings, to a total rebuild, this area of the car has caused trouble from the beginning.  I've complained before about the awful engineering setup that makes access to the rear of the transmission almost impossible due to the free wheeling unit and the rubber rear mount for the Floating Power.  I chronicled the problem with the leak that developed last year from the area where the shafts enter the trans casing.  I thought I had it fixed, using a recommended sealant on the shafts.  Much to my dismay, this spring the leak was back.  Much slower, but it managed to run out and down along the bottom of the trans case over the winter.  This forced me to remove the freewheeling case, rubber mount and transmission cross support once again. as the shaft area is impossible to access when these items are in place.

 

So, off it all came, resulting in this...

 

IMG_0806.jpg.81c57b66abd711306179d65567c0cd81.jpg

 

Notice the rust developing on some of the bolts.  This will be a good time to address that problem.

All to this had to come off to get the freewheeling unit off.

 

IMG_0813.jpg.b2dfd63c47d25dbea78ef399b56423cd.jpg

 

The freewheeling unit after removal.  I'm going to have to make up a new gasket as the old (new) one was destroyed prying the units apart.

 

IMG_0811.jpg.8eab7f4b0bfe8adde8beb1a67829ee73.jpg

 

At least i was able to leave the parking brake drum and U-joint in place.

 

Once I could see the problem area, I was relieved to discover the leak was coming from the bolt in the center of the locking plate and not the shaft areas.  Here's an

old picture of what the area looks like.  I was too lazy to take pictures while I was under the car today.

 

IMG_7108.jpg.332d66c4567a873c17c1ddb3b1635039.jpg

 

I had put a rubber grommet on the bolt to prevent leaks, but I discovered it had torn when I torqued it down.  The leak came along the threads and out behind the bolt head.

I plan to seal the bolt threads with thread compound this time and place a fiber washer under the bolt washer.  Hopefully this will finally fix the problem.  I'm going to fill the tranny up

over the shafts and wait a few weeks before I put everything back together - just in case.  Guess I better get going on that gasket - and cleaning off the remains of the old one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6758.jpg

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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WOW! What a giant pain in the backside that is. Glad to see you discovered it wasn't the shafts.

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I think just to be sure it doesn't leak again I would consider using a bonded seal washer on those Bolts.  Your call of course.

 

Ray.

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I think they call them Dowty washers.  I’d put some thread sealant on the bolt threads too just to be sure - loctite do some thread sealant (rather than thread lock).  

 

If if you want to stop the bolts rusting you could try coating in oil or grease but the best method is probably re plating them.

Edited by RichBad (see edit history)

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21 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

I’m not sure what a bonded seal washer is.  My ignorance is showing.  Inquiring minds want to know.

 

 George Dowty invented them in the 1930s in England but I am sure there are suppliers in the U.S.A.  

 

http://www.potterassoc.com/pdf/bonded_seal_information_and_sizing_chart.pdf

 

Ray

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10 minutes ago, R.White said:

 

 George Dowty invented them in the 1930s in England but I am sure there are suppliers in the U.S.A.  

 

http://www.potterassoc.com/pdf/bonded_seal_information_and_sizing_chart.pdf

 

Ray

Wow! I have never heard of those. Those are awesome items. Thanks very much for sharing.

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I am of course rather biased as my Father (who was an engineer) was deeply involved with the development of all manner of seals.

 

Ray.  

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