1935EB

Paint colors for 1933 Plymouth PD Convertible Coupe

390 posts in this topic

Taylormade,

He will use a single stage, not a system using clear coat. It is a Polyurethane (?) system from PPG. The colors on this Plymouth will be Durode Gray (actually a nice, rich tan) with Red Pin Stripe, door tops, and wire wheels.

It was sure nice seeing the body and sheet metal back on after all these years. I am sure you felt the same way with your '32 Dodge when the body was refitted.

Of course it will all come apart again next week as the fenders etc will be painted off the car and than reassembled.

 

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Visited today and the '33 PD is disassembled again and in paint booth. As most know we struggle with higher humidities than most in this part of the world. We have about five days of lower humidity coming.

 

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Wheels and tires ready for disassembly sandblasting and powder coating. They will be Red, as is on the coupon, to match pin stripe and door top edge.

 

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I had a lot of repair work to add the missing teeth and crank hole ring. screws are there mainly to line up pieces so they can be silver soldered by plater before plating. If they need to stay they will be not noticeable.

 

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Hope this is helpful and informative, Chris

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Had a customer powder coat a 36 Dodge grill and it destroyed the grill because of heat and the grill being made from pot metal. Has anybody else have this problem?

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Can't wait to see it in full colour, you have the wiring loom in as yet, loads to do on these cars to bring them back but you have set a very high standard which all takes time and money, will the rad grill be chromed?

 

Will continue to watch with interest.

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Tom the grill is chrome plated as is the grill shell. Than they paint a good portion of the grill shell leaving only the front bead chrome like your cars.

Dave, thankfully this is not a pot metal grill. Still looking for a door check strap for this car if you can find anything after your move.

Chris

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The wheels are completed. Three are excellent rim, spokes, and hub. One is very good hub, spokes and a very nice rim but with a small dent I did not notice earlier. One is excellent rim and spokes but pitting on hub. I think the hubcaps will cover these. The powder coating is like chrome plating it has a high build that will need to be removed to set the hubcaps in their holes.

 

I bought the tires, tubes, and flaps from the folks at Universal Tire Co. in Pennsylvania. They were helpful and provided a good deal of information. They also have the tubes with straight stems (not off set stems). If I remember these are made for 17 and 18 inch applications. We used a Coat's wheel machine at the tire shop, all tools in touch with rim were nylon. They did not scratch a single one of them.

 

The owner was helpful and I had a chance to teach a younger person about tube tires, baby powder made from talc, installing tubes etc. They even let me help in the shop, a little bit like Tom Sawyer and painting the fence. All in all an easy part of what has been a challenging restoration project. 

 

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1933%20PD%20Plymouth%20Wheel%20d.jpg

 

1933%20PD%20Plymouth%20Wheel%20e.jpg

 

I trust this is helpful, Chris

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On 3/16/2017 at 1:15 PM, countrytravler said:

Had a customer powder coat a 36 Dodge grill and it destroyed the grill because of heat and the grill being made from pot metal. Has anybody else have this problem?

Once, when I was 17 years old I had a pair of rear engine mounts for my 1931 DB powdercoated. BIG MISTAKE! They never told me there was so much heat involved that it would destroy the rubber. I still have them. They look great, but are mushy and useless. Live and learn.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, 1935EB said:

The wheels are completed. Three are excellent rim, spokes, and hub. One is very good hub, spokes and a very nice rim but with a small dent I did not notice earlier. One is excellent rim and spokes but pitting on hub. I think the hubcaps will cover these. The powder coating is like chrome plating it has a high build that will need to be removed to set the hubcaps in their holes.

 

I bought the tires, tubes, and flaps from the folks at Universal Tire Co. in Pennsylvania. They were helpful and provided a good deal of information. They also have the tubes with straight stems (not off set stems). If I remember these are made for 17 and 18 inch applications. We used a Coat's wheel machine at the tire shop, all tools in touch with rim were nylon. They did not scratch a single one of them.

 

The owner was helpful and I had a chance to teach a younger person about tube tires, baby powder made from talc, installing tubes etc. They even let me help in the shop, a little bit like Tom Sawyer and painting the fence. All in all an easy part of what has been a challenging restoration project. 

 

I trust this is helpful, Chris

 

Interesting that Universal has the tubes. . . Last two times I bought tires for mine I couldn't find ones for 17" with radial valve stems. I ended up using motorcycle tires. When this set of tires wear out, I'll be contacting Universal. Thanks for the information!

 

Oh, and your wheels look great!

 

p.s. Did they balance the wheels and tires? Or at least check the balance even if they did not add weights. One of the issues I've had with other brand tires in that size is they seem to take a lot of wheel weights to get balanced (I've checked the wheels without tires and they are true radially and laterally and are balanced so I'm pretty sure the imbalance is in the tires not the rims).

Edited by ply33 (see edit history)

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Todd,

I will use this little jewel I just received. Need to buy wheel weights. This is a Bada Carr M-60 from the 1960's. The wheel fits on the "spindle" so I am good to go as soon as I set it up in my shop and get the weights. I love these old gas station tools.

 

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I will post progress photos if things work out with set up, etc.

 

Chris

 

 

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Man, I have bent over a few of those while working at Firestone....

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30 minutes ago, 1935EB said:

Todd,

I will use this little jewel I just received. Need to buy wheel weights. This is a Bada Carr M-60 from the 1960's. The wheel fits on the "spindle" so I am good to go as soon as I set it up in my shop and get the weights. I love these old gas station tools.

 

I will post progress photos if things work out with set up, etc.

 

Chris

 

That is the same make/model unit I borrowed to balance my wheels last time. Unfortunately the tool's owner moved one direction and I another so borrowing it is no longer feasible and I'll have to do something different for my next set of tires.

 

I am looking forward to hearing how many ounces each of your wheels need to get properly balanced.

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We have 2 with a 1000lbs worth of weights.

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I called it a Carr Bada, it is a Coats Bada. When I worked on cars in the 60's and 70's I never saw a spin balance machine, only these.

 

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Here are photos of the TIG welds on the grille crank hole cove ring.

 

1933%20Plymouth%20PD%20Welded%20Grille%2

 

1933%20Plymouth%20PD%20Grille%20Welded%2

 

The grille is now at the platers. Will post photos when I get it back.

Chris

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