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1934 Packard Eight 4-door sedan 95% ORIGINAL!


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#1 Matt Harwood

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 04:33 PM

*SOLD*

Another remarkable survivor in superior condition, this 1934 Packard is only on its third owner. It's also the most heavily documented pre-war car I've ever seen, with complete service records, the original invoice, and all the original accessories such as the license plate frame (as shown in the 1934 Packard Accessories Brochure) and the ultra-rare Packard Handy Kit, which includes stuff like tar remover, body polish, spare light bulbs, and upholstery cleaner. It is known to the Packard 1100 Registry and is widely regarded as the nicest unrestored 1100 in existence.

It wears its original, Packard-applied code F Abington Blue paint, and while it's a bit thin in spots, it still looks decent. Not show quality anymore, but certainly nicer than 80-old-paint should look. There are quite a few amateurishly done touch-ups that could probably be improved upon, or just leave it as-is and enjoy without worries, which is what I would do. There's no rust and no signs of accidents, although I'm guessing the unusual front bumper guards were installed after one too many bumps to those big front fenders, which I believe were repainted many, many years ago. Chrome is quite good, with very minor pitting on the taillight housings and optional "lady with doughnut" hood ornament. Other accessories include dual sidemounts with metal covers. locking mirrors and trim rings on all six wire wheels.

The interior is extremely well-preserved save for some modest wear on the driver's seat. The carpets are a little threadbare, but things like the woodgrained dash and moldings are excellent, and the rear seat area looks practically new. It has been equipped with an optional Startix system, but was disconnected by the current owner for personal preference reasons, not functional ones, and the same is true of the Bijur system, which is complete but capped so it doesn't make a mess on your garage floor. Perhaps most shockingly, the accessory AM radio is still complete, as are all the gauges, which are simply gorgeous. It has been fitted with aftermarket turn signals for safety, and all the chrome interior fittings are excellent.

After several years in storage, it has been recently and extensively serviced by David Heinrichs of Heinrichs' Vintage Car Shop, including removing the cylinder head, new gaskets, rebuilt carburetor, new ignition components, and cleaning out the coolant passages. It starts almost instantly and drives beautifully, with typical Packard torque and performance, and never goes above 170 degrees indicated on the gauge. It is equipped with the optional high compression cylinder head on the 320 cubic inch straight-8, and with 4.69 gears it happily cruises at 45-50 MPH. The transmission shifts smoothly with no noises and excellent synchros, the brakes are astoundingly powerful (the adjustable power assist works as it should) and the ride is supple in a way that's hard to describe. It has a great grumbly exhaust note that is totally vintage, and newer Dayton blackwall tires have been fitted which suit it perfectly.

To be honest, if I hadn't purchased my 1929 Cadillac a few years ago, I would be all over this car in a heartbeat and I still haven't ruled out putting it in my own collection somehow. If you've never driven an all-original car, it will open your eyes as to how good these cars really were and how smooth, tight, and well-engineered they feel on the road. A stately Full Classic that represents arguably the best year of Packard design in a very road-worthy package. Thanks for looking!

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Edited by Matt Harwood, 01 March 2013 - 06:36 PM.
SOLD

Matt Harwood (BCA #38767, AACA #987226, CLC #26668, CCCA)
My driver:
1929 Cadillac 341B 5-Passenger Sedan
My project:
1941 Buick Century Sedanette
My business:
Harwood Motors

#2 Marty Roth

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 09:13 PM

Matt,

I'm impressed that you continue to come up with these exceptional examples. My HPOF Original 1937 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton is yet another reminder of how special these all-original Classics really are, and my 1930 Packard 733 proves the special nature of the standard series Packard,

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Edited by Marty Roth, 09 November 2012 - 09:17 PM.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
MARTY ROTH - NEW ORLEANS, LA

AACA DIRECTOR & VP-EVENTS PLANNING
SENIOR-MASTER JUDGE
AACA LIFE MEMBER

1915 HUDSON 6-40 7-PASSENGER TOURING
1930 PACKARD 733 7-PASSENGER TOURING
1934 BUICK 34-57 SIDEMOUNTED SEDAN
1937 BUICK 80C ROADMASTER PHAETON
1941 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1954 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1970 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1986 CHEVY SUBURBAN 2500 454ci
1988 BMW 528e
1988 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE
1994 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD
1995 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD

1995 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
2005 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE
1954 U-HAUL


#3 Tom Laferriere

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:01 PM

Hi Matt, I'll offer my 1925 Rolls Royce 20 Park Ward for it. You know I'm a Packard guy!

Marty, sorry I missed you at Hershey.

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1910 Super Duper Special Car
1913 Oldsmobile Defender
1915 Oakland Speedster
1920 Buick Powered Racer
1921 Ford Speedster #20
1923 Peerless Speedster
1934 Packard 1104 Touring
1934 Packard 1107 Sedan
1939 Packard 120 Coupe

WEB: www.tomlaferriere.com

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#4 37Packard

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 12:13 AM

He bought it new at Packard of Pittsburgh where they don't know how to spell "Pittsburgh" correctly? What's up with that?

#5 Rob McDonald

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:10 PM

These forums are a tough place to hang out if you care too much about spelling. Terrific Packard.
Rob McDonald
1957 Buick Roadmaster model 73A, owned since February 1973

#6 trimacar

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 03:41 AM

Think an underpaid secretary, typing on her old Underwood typewriter (OK quick thought, how many on this forum learned to type without an electronic keyboard?), and she misses the last letter in the city name.......what the heck, she'll just let it ride.....

Great looking car...
David Coco
Winchester Va.
(early upholstery, will discuss
2015 projects)
1910 Model 20 Hupmobile runabout
1910 Buick Model 16 toy tonneau
1910 Hudson Model 20 fore door roadster
1927 Dodge fast four convertible coupe
1931 Chevrolet tudor
1931 Pierce Arrow Model 43 phaeton
1937 Cord standard phaeton
1938 Packard Super 8 convertible coupe
1953 Chevrolet 5 window pickup
1967 Lincoln Continental convertible
1969 Cutlass convertible
1971 Pontiac Firebird Esprit

#7 Marty Roth

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 05:34 AM

Now, this comment is off of the thread, but to the comments:

For a period of time during, and following World War I (The War to End All Wars), you know, the one before World War II, I've been told that a great many American cities whose names ended in the Germanic spelling "burgh" were advised to DROP the final "h", as the spelling was considered too "Germanic". The spelling noted upon the invoice for this Packard was considered correct during the period of the sale.

Pittsburg(h) , Pennsylvania has claimed to be the only city to re-adopt the "h". I've no idea if other cities have don this as well, but it makes an interesting story.

Oh, and as you suggest David, the secretary at Packard Headquarters in 1934 probably wasn't all that overpaid, but considering the depression years, she was likely happy to have a job.

Edited by Marty Roth, 11 November 2012 - 05:38 AM.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
MARTY ROTH - NEW ORLEANS, LA

AACA DIRECTOR & VP-EVENTS PLANNING
SENIOR-MASTER JUDGE
AACA LIFE MEMBER

1915 HUDSON 6-40 7-PASSENGER TOURING
1930 PACKARD 733 7-PASSENGER TOURING
1934 BUICK 34-57 SIDEMOUNTED SEDAN
1937 BUICK 80C ROADMASTER PHAETON
1941 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1954 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1970 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE
1986 CHEVY SUBURBAN 2500 454ci
1988 BMW 528e
1988 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE
1994 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD
1995 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD

1995 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
2005 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE
1954 U-HAUL


#8 trimacar

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:39 AM

Interesting story, Marty. I've had people tell me to get the H out, usually adding the comment "and never come back", never knew quite what it meant until now......

#9 37Packard

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 01:22 PM

Now, this comment is off of the thread, but to the comments:

For a period of time during, and following World War I (The War to End All Wars), you know, the one before World War II, I've been told that a great many American cities whose names ended in the Germanic spelling "burgh" were advised to DROP the final "h", as the spelling was considered too "Germanic". The spelling noted upon the invoice for this Packard was considered correct during the period of the sale.

Pittsburg(h) , Pennsylvania has claimed to be the only city to re-adopt the "h". I've no idea if other cities have don this as well, but it makes an interesting story.

Oh, and as you suggest David, the secretary at Packard Headquarters in 1934 probably wasn't all that overpaid, but considering the depression years, she was likely happy to have a job.


I've never heard that before but it makes sense because it was spelled that way twice on the invoice. As usual, Wikipedia has their act together. Check out this list of other cities named Pittsburg. Thanks for the interesting comments....

Not to be confused with Pittsburgh (with an "h" on the end and most commonly used to refer to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) or with Pitsburg, Ohio (with one "t" and no "h").
Pittsburg may refer to:

In the United States:

Pittsburg, Alabama
Pittsburg Point, Arizona village that predates and was absorbed by Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Pittsburg, Arkansas
Pittsburg, California, a city in Contra Costa County named in 1911
Pittsburg, Nevada County, California, a former settlement
Pittsburg, Colorado
Pittsburg, Florida
Pittsburg, DeKalb County, Georgia
Pittsburg, Walker County, Georgia
Pittsburg Landing, Idaho
Pittsburg, Fayette County, Illinois
Pittsburg, Illinois, in Williamson County
Pittsburg, Indiana
Pittsburg, Montgomery County, Iowa
Pittsburg, Van Buren County, Iowa
Pittsburg, Kansas, Crawford County, founded 1876
Pittsburg State University, located in that town
Pittsburg Township, Mitchell County, Kansas
Pittsburg, Kentucky
Pittsburg, Michigan
Pittsburg, Mississippi
Pittsburg, Missouri
Pittsburg, Nebraska
Pittsburg, New Hampshire
Pittsburg, Nevada
Pittsburg, New Mexico
Pittsburg, North Carolina
Pittsburg, Oklahoma
Pittsburg County, Oklahoma
Pittsburg, Oregon
Pittsburg, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
West Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
Pittsburg, South Carolina
Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee
South Pittsburg, Tennessee
Pittsburg, Texas
Pittsburg, Utah

In Canada:

Pittsburg, Ontario
Pittsburg Island, Ontario
Pittsburg, British Columbia

Edited by 37Packard, 11 November 2012 - 01:29 PM.


#10 Owen_Dyneto

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

As the owner for 49 years of another mostly original 1934 Eight 1100 I can really appreciate this car. But I'd be real concerned about starving the engine bearings for oil with that bypass type oil filter with it's very small diameter lines inserted in what appears to be a series connection with the original full-flow oil system. It will certainly greatly reduce the volume of oil delivered to the engine. This was originally an external full-flow filter system with very large oil lines for a high volume of oil delivery.

#11 buicknewbee

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:24 PM

Nice Car! I'd drive it in a heart beat! I wouldn't mind owning it,but I'm out of money now.
Darren

#12 Matt Harwood

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:37 PM

*SOLD* Thank you!
Matt Harwood (BCA #38767, AACA #987226, CLC #26668, CCCA)
My driver:
1929 Cadillac 341B 5-Passenger Sedan
My project:
1941 Buick Century Sedanette
My business:
Harwood Motors




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