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Buicknutty

1941 McLaughlin Buick Roadmaster

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Here's a couple of pictures I took of my '41 at a friend's place, out in the country on Sat. The interior isn't done yet, but got most of the bits together, and got it running well after being off of the road for 30 years or more. Mechanicals were rebuilt, plus lots and lots of body work. The McLaughlin Buicks were Canadian built till '42, after that they were just called Buicks, though in these years there is almost no difference between Canadian and US built Buicks. So mine being a coupe is the same as the US model 76S.

Keithpost-77136-143139158314_thumb.jpg

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What a handsome car! Again, there's that long Roadmaster hood on a coupe - very sporting. Does your car have McLaughlin Buick emblems and wheelcovers? Someone told me a long time ago that after 1938, only the export models - those that went to the UK mostly - retained the Canadian badging. True or false?

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Rob;

Thanks. There's very little documentation, as all records were destroyed by GM, and most printed copy were simply copies of the US versions, with a Canadian address added, but it is true that after '38 the Canadian models don't have any distinctive badging, though I don't know about the exported cars.

Keith

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Interesting that you can corroborate that 1938 was the end-of-the-line for McLaughlin badging in the Canadian market. I heard about this years ago from Vern Bethel, second owner of the maroon Royal Tour 1939 Buick (the other one is black). The car has McLaughlin Buick emblems and wheel covers. He had thought that they'd been custom made for this very special occasion but then he found another identical wheel cover at a swap meet. It was just too much of a coincidence, so he did some research and found that Oshawa-built Buicks headed for England got the full M-B treatment, at least through 1939.

I'm guessing there were few, if any, civilian cars exported to England from Canada or the US, after the war broke out in '39. Comments are encouraged from our UK correspondents, even if it's to tell me I'm full of beans or baloney or whatever they say Over There.

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I have met Vern only a few times over the years, as I'm in Toronto, and he's in BC. I was president of the McLaughlin Buick Club for some years.

Though I think that the second Royal Tour is the same maroon colour as Vern's, as I have seen it in the Museum in Ottawa.

Keith

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Beware of me and my made-up facts. I depend too much on memory. The photos below confirm that both Buicks are maroon. So is the Lincoln but not the Chrysler. I am making no claims about how many of each were built or still exist. It is nice, though, to view them all in one place, isn't it? Even the Royals didn't get to see that.

West Coast Buick, Ottawa-based Buick, Lincoln, Chrysler

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Rob;

Thanks for posting the pictures. I've seen pictures of the Lincoln somewhere before, but never the Chrysler, and it's neat to see them all together like that. Other than the 2 McLaughlins, I have no idea of the fate of the others. Also, I think that I remember reading that there were back up cars for the Lincoln and Chrysler too, but like you commented, relying on memory too much is a risky business!

Keith

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Keith,

Glad to see photos of your beautiful car, and glad to see you're out enjoying it.

Keep 'em coming!

Anderson

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Keith, how can you sleep at night knowing you have such a sweet car waiting to go for a ride? It's awesome. The 41's are really looking better and better lately. And I am a total sucker for a maroon Buick.

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Maroon, WHAT A NEAT COLOR. As a kid dad took me to lots of midget races, there was an Offy, this was in the mid to late 40's that was Maroon, with Gold numbers. #79, and it was a winner often, Chuck Marshall was the driver. Bob Davis was the car owner. We attended many a race in central Il.

Yep, Maroon, great color.

Dale in Indy

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What a handsome car! Again, there's that long Roadmaster hood on a coupe - very sporting.

Exactly my thoughts . . . I love the coupes with extra long hoods.

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Thanks for the kind words, guys! It has been a labour of love for many years, I bought it in late 1991, and got going on it about '98 or so.

Keith

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KEITH, I gather the difference between a Buick Sport Coupe and an Opera Coupe is that the latter had a folding occasional seat behind the driver. Was that still true in '41? Earlier Sport Coupes often have rumble seats and golf bag doors but those would have been passé by1941. Was there also a 70 series Business Coupe that year, with no division between the trunk and the interior?

Back to the Royal Tour cars for a minute: the Chrysler was shown in Murray Gammon's car museum in downtown Victoria, BC throughout the 1970s and '80s. Interestingly, this was within a couple of miles of where the "West Coast" parade Buick sat for years, in the garage of its long-time second owner. Everyone in the old car hobby in Victoria seems to have known the whereabouts of that Buick, so I wonder if Mr. Gammon (who died in 2008) ever tried to buy it?

Vern Bethel, where the heck are you? We need your first-person experience here. Vern wrote an excellent article for the Buick Bugle in about 1987, which I kept for years but then I donated all of my Bugles - and Automobile Quarterlies - to the Reynolds Alberta Museum in Westaskiwin, Alberta (Reynolds-Alberta Museum). Any of you who've hung onto your back issues, I'd sure appreciate it if you would please scan Vern's story and post it on the thread linked below.

For more ramblings and many good links, go to http://forums.aaca.org/f165/royal-tour-buick-canadas-most-historic-298166.html

Edited by Rob McDonald
spelling, again (see edit history)

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Rob;

I've have to check to be sure, but they're weren't any opera coupes in 1941, nor any business coupes in any other series than the 40 series. I don't think that were any business coupes ever made on the bigger 70 series chassis, though I can't find my "70 years of Buick" right now to check! I may have that article in the Bugle you're asking about, as I think that I still have most of the issues from the eighties.

Keith

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DALE, your reference to model 76SX intrigued me, so I went Googling - 1941 buick 76sx - Google Search. I learned that the "X" refers to export cars. That suggests to me that these cars would have been built according to their destination - right-hand drive, maybe a lower compression engine for where only low octane fuel was available, with or without a heater, etc.

KEITH, I also learned that all Roadmaster Sport Coupes were 5-passenger cars, with a full back seat. The "normal" model 46 Special Business Coupe was a fastback, like a Sedanet but without the back seat. Again, I wonder if the trunk was open to the interior, without a bulkhead. Interestingly, there was another Special Business Coupe, modei 41A-44, with a shorter wheelbase and a notchback body shared with Chevrolet. I can't find a photo of that one.

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Edited by Rob McDonald (see edit history)

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I am quite sure the business coupe did have a panel between the passenger compartment and the trunk. It would have been to hard to HEAT without such, IMO.

Dad purchased lots of 41's that were wrecked, and I believe I recall the divider panel.

Dale in Indy

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Well, I led a group of us from the McLaughlin Buick Club of Canada this weekend on a Fall Tour through some scenic back roads (paved) of the Muskoka region of Ontario, an lovely area noted for its' great fall colours. Here's a few pictures of my car, taken on tour, and a few of my new door panels (with the old armrest, that'll be this week) and the back seat. I'm still waiting on the ashtrays, but the seats at long last are done and in the car. All sewn by by me. A couple of the "in progress" pictures of my back seat, too.

For the door panels though, I broke down and had them professionally redone. Plus one of yours truly with my car.

Nearly 400 miles,and the '41 ran great the whole trip!

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Edited by Buicknutty
grammar (see edit history)

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Lookin' sharp Keith (car and driver both:D)! Glad to hear she's running good for you. It's a great feeling isn't it? Hope to see her in person one day. My Wife is already talking about our first trip to Canada. She's loved Canada the whole time I've known her. She's even tried to get me to move up there before. She spent a short time in Toronto and the surrounding areas on a vacation. In a small cabin on a lake somewhere. Can't remember the name of the town. Anyway, happy motoring my friend!

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Thanks, Robert. Look me up if you get up to Toronto sometime. We like it here, and there are lots of things to see and do if you're visiting.

Keith

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The 41 is so nice Keith! Of course now you probably have the same problem as me...which car do you take out on any given day?... Oh the tangeled web we weave! LOL

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KEITH, it must be very fine to sit on seats that you upholstered yourself. The "sandwich" looks to be much like the construction of fine furniture, with burlap (known as hessian) over steel springs. Then would come a thick layer of cotton stuffing, built-up "hard edges", and a sheet of light canvas (muslin), which would shape any pleats or rolls. Finally the wool cloth, including piping and buttons. Does that sound right? There appears to be no wood in the seats, so the cloth must be held onto the wire spring frames with hog rings. I imagine that makes it tougher to get a smooth, flat finish, compared with setting tacks into wood framing.

What kind of sewing machine did you use? I have my mother-in-law's old treadle Singer, which I'm told is good for sewing upholstery, including vinyl and even leather. The machine's leather drive belt is broken, though, so I've got the challenge of fixing that before I can start torturing cloth and vinyl.

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"Every woman's crazy 'bout a sharp dressed mannnn!"

Looking tight my friend. And I love those Canadian window cranks :) I just sent you a PM.

Anderson

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Canadian window cranks

They came with wee, fitted sheepskin covers, like a steering wheel cover. :rolleyes:

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