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JC Boutin

BEST AUTOMOTIVE PAINT FOR ANTIQUE CAR

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JC Boutin    0

WOULD LIKE TO FIND THE BEST AUTOMOTIVE PAINT

FOR AN ANTIQUE CARS.

URETHANE ONE STEP OR BASE COAT?

MY CADILLAC 1926 TOURING HAS

PPG DP 40 AS PRIMER.

WONT TO HAVE PREMIUM QUALITY PAINT.

PLEASE HELP.

THANKS

JC BOUTIN

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What you put down for primer may dictate what you put on for your final coat. I'm sure someone else may chime in with more detailed information.

I don't know which is he best brand of paint, but it's possible that it will conflict with the brand of primer you put down.

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Bhigdog    879

A lot of folks use base/clear for a repaint on old cars. The stuff looks spectacular with a deep wet look. It does NOT look like it did originally and some people detest the look on an old car. Single stage urethane with hardener, color sanded and buffed will mimic the original paint with a mirror finish. Just my opinion............Bob

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billybird    10

This could be a matter of preference; but personally I like and use PPG base coat/ clear coat. Make sure to use the same brand from metal to finish. Even the manufacturers recommend this. Remember; it's not how good you are with the gun, it's how good you are with the sandpaper and buffer.

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MarrsCars    44

Here's an example of single-stage and how lovely and correct it looks on vintage cars. Clear coat just doesn't look right to me, tho it's becoming more and more common. It's like using armor all on your tires instead of just cleaning them really well, not everything needs to be shiny folks!

DSC04587.JPG

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trimacar    481

I'm a big fan of Glasurit, which is a single stage. I have this on my Pierce, and wish I had it on every car. It's the slickest finish I've seen, dust just slides off it.

I've heard stories about clear coat, not sure what's true. That it's hard to touch up, that it was first used because the cost of paint was high and cost of clear was not, have no idea what the truth is.

I do know that I really like the look of the Glasurit, it's a high quality paint.

I don't think you have an issue with the DP primer, it's just an epoxy base, you've got other, sandable, primer and spot filler to go long before the paint itself goes on, and those should be compatable with your final paint choice.

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South_paw    0

To answer your question correctly, we would need to know more about your situation.

Are you doing the work yourself or will a shop do it for you?

If you are doing it on your own, please provide us with your compressor size, spray gun setup and application environment.

After 20+ years in the refinish business... I can attest to one thing for sure, the best paint in the world is the one that fits the appropriate situation.

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trimacar    481

Base coat/ clear coat sure has a good marketing campaign, though, you'd think from all the comments at shows of people bragging on "clear" that they were being paid to do so...

I receive a trade magazine that just was discussing the new water-based automobile paints, and how they are used in manufacturing now.....it does look like the new car industry is getting away from the factory orange peel effect....I have a friend in the body shop business who told me once they had to up the spray pressure when they painted one body panel on a car, to get the orange peel to match the rest of the car...

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JC Boutin    0

THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST.

A SHOP WILL DO THE PAINT.

I HAVE THE CHOICE OF 3 EXCELLENT SHOPS.

ONE WORK WITH BASE COAT/CLEAR COAT.

ANOTHER WITH GLASURIT,

AND THE OTHER WITH PPG CONCEPT

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karasmer    10

How about preperation, can a lightly rusted body be wire wheeled then coated with rust encapsulating primer before final paint? Also what would be an approximate cost for the final paint job materials for say a Model A coupe size car?

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Mochet    0

The early high-end cars (and carriages) used base coat/clear coat... though not urethanes, of course, so it's not really "incorrect."

Phil

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gavinnz    1
WOULD LIKE TO FIND THE BEST AUTOMOTIVE PAINT

FOR AN ANTIQUE CARS.

/QUOTE]

What's your working definition of "BEST".....

The best gloss?

The best wearing/stone chip/fading resistance?

The best at replicating what the finish looked like as it rolled out of the Cadillac show room in 1926?

Regards

Gavin (painter by trade)

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gavinnz    1

Just some general rambling thoughts on the over all subject of paint for cars...

I have been into this is a big way while working out what paint to use on my two 1915 cars.

Some of the variables that have to be taken into account are as follows....

In the early days, from coaches to the invention of duco in the mid 1920's cars were painted with types of paint that were mostly hand done..... built up layers sanded between coats.

Some were finished to a VERY high deep gloss, some were not. Some of the brushed emamels from the brass and early vintage era were low temerature baked to a super high gloss as they re flowed at temperature.

The make of car has to be taken into account. High end cars have always been painted to a different standard to low price cars. (eg Ford hosed the paint on, Rolls Royce hand painted it and polishd the finish with pumice)

So the year of the car can dictate the type of paints avaliable at the time, then the standard of work has to be worked out.

Now in the present day.... a good paint put on my someone who does not know how to use it will be bad. So it's the paint AND the painter that's important to get the finish you want.

In general I think people do not realise just how glossy some ealy cars were, as the finished did not last long... (ie did not hold their gloss for long) so now any remaining paint looks dull.

For my higher end 1915 cars I have chosen a top quality marine two pack polyeurathane with clear coat in order to replicate the baked enamel of top cars of that era... and to get the best chip and fade resitance.

Anyway their is my ramble!

Regards

Gavin

Edited by gavinnz (see edit history)

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gavinnz    1

"General Motors (GM) introduced Duco finish on its Oakland models in 1923 "

"1924 - Cadillac pioneered the use of fast-drying Duco lacquer paints and offer over 500 color combinations "

So your 1926 Cadillac would have been painted in Duco lacquer at the factory.

Regards

Gavin

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Restorer32    494

Opinions on which paint is "best" are like belly buttons, everyone has one. The final look of any paint will depend more on how it is wet sanded and buffed than anything else. I can tell you this, walk down the Classics aisle at Hershey and most of the cars will be base/clear. More than once I've heard someone say "now that's how a lacquer paint job is supposed to look" while the person is staring at a base/clear or other system. If you see a car that has that "wet" look it's because it was not properly color sanded and buffed to the appropriate sheen.

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gavinnz    1
The final look of any paint will depend more on how it is wet sanded and buffed than anything else.

If you see a car that has that "wet" look it's because it was not properly color sanded and buffed to the appropriate sheen.

Can you explain more about what you mean by those lines?

Some paints (like duco) go on quite flat and have to be wet sanded and buffed and waxed to give a glossy surface. Some paints (like 2 pack polyeurothane) produce a "gloss off the gun" that do not need sanding after application, just a slight buff and wax.

Regards

Gavin

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Restorer32    494

Polyurethanes may not "need" sanding after application but if you want the appropriate level of shine and lack or presence of orange peel it is certainly necessary to color sand and buff. Block sand the surface perfectly flat and level, as in no gloss at all, then buff and polish just like you would lacquer.

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gavinnz    1

I think the bit I need explaining is the "appropriate level of shine"

Do you mean you sand the paint back then buff it up to a lower level of gloss than is possible with that paint in order to replcate a lacquer finish?

The polyeurothanes I have used have gone on so smooth that I didn't have orange peal... I thinned out my last coats of color a little so they let the job flow. Can look like glass if it does not run!

Interesting topic:)

Regards

Gavin

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trimacar    481

OK, West, didn't know. I do know that the paint on my Pierce is single-stage Glasurit. It doesn't have the "deep" shine of a lacquer paint job, I'll admit, it's more like a porcelain finish. Durable, though, and very easy to maintain, and that's what I was looking for.

Made by BASF, Glasurit is, I believe, the high end paint. My Hupp has Limco, the low end of the line for BASF, and I'm not as pleased with it.

Remember these comments are coming from a trimmer, not a painter!

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R W Burgess    127
THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST.

A SHOP WILL DO THE PAINT.

I HAVE THE CHOICE OF 3 EXCELLENT SHOPS.

ONE WORK WITH BASE COAT/CLEAR COAT.

ANOTHER WITH GLASURIT,

AND THE OTHER WITH PPG CONCEPT

JC, I'm going to give you credit for letting the body shop paint man work with his own system.

So many people, myself included (in the past) have tried to tell a professional that he, or she, should use "this" on their vehicle.

I'd suggest getting a look at vehicles that your shops of interest have done in the past. Word of mouth is the best indicator of a job well done!;)

Wayne

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Dynaflash8    191

What is best is nitrocellulous lacquer --- but you can't get it anymore, and if you do you won't find a painter who will paint the car (too much work for younger people), so you'll have to do it yourself. What is the alternative? Basecoat/clearcoat. The younger painters will paint that.

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Guest mlongfield   
Guest mlongfield

Hi All,

Just my two cents:

There is a big thing to note here, not all jurisdictions allow the same paint products to be used as there are VOC compliance issues with a good deal of the traditional paint products we all know and love. For example, if you are in the Province of Ontario (such as I) (or many States, and soon to be a Federal regulation) a shop cannot spray lacquer or solvent based base coat / clear coat because they do not meet the strict VOC compliance regulations that the Canadian jurisdiction is subject to.

There are several stories of people starting restoration projects with solvent paint/primer systems that have to finish with the new age products and have compatibility issues. My advice is to make sure you use (or make sure the shop uses) the same system all the way through from first epoxy primer to final top coat and follow the strict instructions of the TDS (technical data sheets) for the products.

In my shop we are limited to using waterborne base coat / clear coat and VOC compliant single stage. Before we switched, I was under the impression that waterborne was some sort of "space age" invention, but I was surprised to find out that automobile manufacturers have been using the waterborne paint systems since the 1980s! (I think a majority of car guys will be surprised about that)

Our shop has great results with both the Glasurit single stage and waterborne products, and depending on the lustre you are after one of the two systems will achieve "the right look". Here is a link that shows some of the cars we have painted recently with both single stage and waterborne. All the Best, Michael Longfield

Past and Current Restorations

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