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straight shooter

Chrysler/DeSoto airflows

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I would like to know what is the difference between the Chrysler Airflows and the DeSoto Airflows, thanks.

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I would like to know what is the difference between the Chrysler Airflows and the DeSoto Airflows, thanks.

Too many to list here.

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Posted (edited)

Go on the Airflow website it is a Yahoo group. The Airflow website library has an identification reference. If you click on the Airflow/Airstream just to the left it will be your first option "Welcome Airflow Enthusiast"

Jay

Edited by jazzer3 (see edit history)

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I'll take a stab at it. Yes, check the Airflow Club website.

Chrysler decided to offer the Airflow in 2 of it's 4 series as a hedge against it's controversial styling. Dodge was a purchased brand with a strong following and was one of the industries renowned names, so Dodge was out of the question because IF the Airflow "bombed" which it did - then it could damage Dodge loyalty and sales for years.

Plymouth was a created market/brand by Chrysler and could have been used but was the volume leader and the Airflow added cost and complexity, so DeSoto was the obvious choice to run a lower cost Airflow.

All DeSoto Airflows had unique grille and side styling and all had the 6 cylinder engine. Wheelbases were shorter. I had a friend from Newton, Iowa that owned and drove a 35 DeSoto 4 door sedan and it was a wonderful 6 cyl car.

Chrysler Airflows used only 8 cylinder motors and were built on longer wheelbases with unique grilles. Chryslers introduced the aluminum 8 cyl head, power brakes and offered overdrive on the Airflow.

DeSotos gave up on Airflows in 1936. Chrysler offered one last AirFlow dubbed the C17 - in 1937.

It (1937) was a much more normal Airflow with a grille that stood up but is widely regarded as a beautiful example of Art Deco styling. Few parts interchange between the Chrysler Airflow and the DeSoto Airflow.

Both cars have merit if you are interested in purchasing one but the DeSoto drivetrain is MUCH easier to rebuild and find parts for.

Resell favors the Chryslers and Imperial wheelbase Airflows over the DeSoto Airflows. The longer the wheelbase the better looking the Airflow. (Think VW Bug as too short) Streamlining favored the longer wheelbase cars.

Today, if a Chrysler Airflow is properly restored, correct it can draw huge dollars as history has been kind to the car. 34's are the least liked because of the love it or hate it grilles.

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The big difference is SIZE.

All DeSoto's were straight 6 cylinder powered, all Chryslers were straight 8's.

The bigger the Airflow model, the more the horsepower.

All were awesome vehicles and it would be an honor to own either.

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All were awesome vehicles and it would be an honor to own either.

I would take either one I agree. Chrysler is an engineer run company back then but still I think they "played" with each to create a different effect.

The best DeSoto Airflows had grilles which mimicked the new Art Deco Chrysler Building in NYC. Not sure they would have tried that with the more conservative Chrysler/Imperials.

I owned a 36 C9 and have crawled in and around a C17. I have followed auctions for 35 Airflows in Imperial class wheelbases and they are simply awesome cars.

I own a warn out 36 Buick Roadmaster which I am restoring and is a money pit but my ultimate 30's car would be a 37 C17. I have come close on a couple of them, but timing is everything.

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Hello,

Can anybody please me with acquirring a pair of door handles like this?

106301d1321212416t-door-handle-246.jpg

I am desperate!!!

Regards

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