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Richard1

Progress Report on my Renault Ondine in Bolivia

42 posts in this topic

Watching your progress brings back a lot of memories. I bought 1959 Renault Dauphine when I was just out of High School, probably around 1962. It was an almost new, low mileage car, but had been hit in the front end.

We cut it in half just in front of the front seat and at the window posts and grafted a new front end on it. We found a car at the wreaking yard that had been rolled but the front end was perfect. They wanted $175.00 for the front end, but would sell me the whole car for $200, as they didn't want to go to the trouble of cutting it in half.

As luck would have it, another guy happened along that was looking for an engine for a Renault. We struck a deal at the counter, I purchased the car for $200, the other guy gave me half, and we split the car..!

I took it home and cut the front end off and he picked the remains and off he went. One of those lucky days when things went right..!!

Years later I worked at a foreign car parts store. Customers would come in and request a water pump for a Renault, and our first question would be, is it 6V or 12V. That always drew some strange looks, but the same time the factory changed voltage, they also changed water pump design, so the easiest way to determine which pump they needed was to ask what voltage is was..

It was a fun, inexpensive car to drive, I enjoyed it while it lasted.

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cool story. One thing I've noticed is that they were made differently for the US than France. And different again in Argentina. Different filter threads, etc.

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ive got buddies in france that own a renault garage they have alot of Renault parts pm and let me know if you want thier address their son speaks english

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If it comes to that I'll let you know. There may be some things I need. But that is about 6000 miles from here.

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Yesterday, I read your study about engine oil. It seems that you know something about that; I may revise some misconceptions I had about oils. Anyway, thank you for it!

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There may be some things I need. But that is about 6000 miles from here.

When I'm needed parts for my Cads, I don't care about the distance; for example, California is about the same distance from Switzerland than Bolivia to France!

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You are right, Roger, and the parts for my Mini are mostly coming out of the UK. Japanese tires, mounted on UK wheels in the UK, shipped to Oklahoma by air, Houston by truck, Chile by sea, Santa Cruz, Bolivia by truck, the last 450 miles to Tarija in my Grand Cherokee.

Most of my Renault parts are coming out of Argentina for the moment. I'm a little concerned about the temperature sender, since I've discovered other parts where the thread were different in different countries.

Oil happens to be my passion. I really hate to see people get ripped off and ruin otherwise perfectly good engines and transmissions by myths and marketing slogans. I will soon add something to the one on motor oils, since a cyber-friend has donated a sealed can of oil from the 60's. I sent it off to the lab to see what was really in the oils of the time.

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Great post for restoration of old car, you really work hard on it which is very appreciable. Thanks for sharing it.

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I've been concentrating on the Mini, so not much done on the Renault. Got some more parts for the Renault from Argentina, and cleaned off all the old paint from the speedometer glass, taking a template to a local sign shop and having them match the template onto the glass.

post-56369-143141928851_thumb.jpg

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I finally grabbed some time and assembled the front suspension parts I had fabricated, plus the front brakes. Then, since the seats were so bad, I got a "new" set sent from Buenos Aires and stripped it and painted for upholstery.

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[TD]seats_disassembled.jpg[/TD]

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[TD]seat_frames_painted.jpg[/TD]

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A little more to report on the seats at least. Foam is cut and trimmed and most of the upholstery sewn together. Now it is time to fit it all together. That is a brown vinyl with an ivory synthetic suede in the middle. I was going to use leather, but it wouldn't look 60's with leather.

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Posted (edited)

Hello Richard. Your surgery on the Renault and Mini have to be seen to be believed. Xclnt.

On a side note, related to your business activities, can you direct us to information about changing from a bypass oil filter made for a 1930 vehicle to a modern bypass filter that would do the job? My car is a 1930 Dodge 8 and originally had a Purolator EF-half. I have been unable to find a replacement. Ideally I want a look-alike, one that would do the job would be xclnt. Later I would like to open up an original and hide a modern filter inside.

Thank you for any help you can offer. Thank you also for your oil White Paper; I learnt a lot and will use oil closer to your recommendations in the Dodge and 1939 Studebaker.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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I am not an expert on those filters. I've seen some that the top comes off for replacement elements, which would probably be easy to find a replacement element, and some that I didn't see if they came apart. There are several kits available, I've seen people mention Amsoil kits, and I know a lot of people have put something on VW's that had no filter.

Unfortunately The only really antique I found, but couldn't find a way to sneak into the country was a 27 Chrysler Pickup, but I never got far enough with the project to look at all the parts.

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Posted (edited)

It has been a while since I reported any progress, and for a while there was very little as I worked on the Mini and my body guy had too much business (or needed a break from this). Anyway, while the car was in the body shop for 47 months, I did get a little done, fabricating the scripts for the body, freeing up the speedometer, polishing details, straightening the trim, etc. 

I finally got my body guy started again in June, and he basically finished it by mid September, so I have it back at my Tarija garage where in the moments I get I am finishing it up. I've almost finished the brakes (was missing a couple of washers), and have started on the wiring. I've installed the repaired and re-chromed bumpers and hinges, and front and rear lights, lined the inside with Fatmat, sprayed the underside with rust-proofing and a latex undercoating, polished and installed the dash trim pieces and polished the new (used) side vents. I also patched and painted the used steering wheel I had gotten from Argentina and sanded/polished the control assembly for the steering column. And I repaired the rusted windshield wiper pivots, welded the radiator support, and painted various parts that had escaped. 

 

I also got more parts from Argentina and located (and received) the exterior emblems from Germany.

Someone wanted an arm and a leg for the little covers for the bumper joints, so I clipped and sanded a pice of stainless to make my own.

 

I also received my tires from the USA. Actually made in Taiwan, but a size that is not available here.

 

I'll be going back to Tarija next week, and Carnaval and business permitting, will see how much more I can do. When I finish the wiring and upholstery I'll take it back to the body shop for polishing and installing the exterior trim that I got from Argentina.

 

Here are a few pictures. At the moment it is resting next to the Mini until I return.

 

as-delivered-from-shop.jpg
package-argentina.jpg
sanding-polishing-controls.jpg
controls-polished.jpg
steering-wheel patched.jpg
painting-steering-wheel.jpg
shields-painted.jpg
bumpers-lights-in-place.jpg
rear-bumper.jpg
trim-to-straighten.jpg
finished-roof-trim.jpg
bare-front-floor.jpg
bare-rear.jpg
installing-Fatmat-rear.jpg
installing-Fatmat-front.jpg
Fatmat-on-floor-and-rear.jpg
doors-painted-anticorrosive.jpg
Fatmat-on-doors.jpg
covered-in-Fatmat.jpg
undercoated.jpg
wiper-restoration.jpg
making-stainlees-bumper-trim.jpg
bumper-trim.jpg
vent-before-sanding.jpg
fender-vent-polished.jpg
glove-box-trim-polished.jpg
radiator-filler-neck.jpg
cracks-radiator-support.jpg
tail-light-installed.jpg
Dauphine-emblems.jpg
Nankang-135R15-tires.jpg
resting.jpg

 

 

Edited by Richard1
more explanations (see edit history)
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That little car is good looking! It will probably be quieter than stock with all the Fatmat you used.

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