Recommended Posts

You explained it fine Bernie.  I find it amazing that the taper on the center section would provide enough range of movement to the rollers and plunger to actuate the brakes.  I assume the adjustment to compensate for wear is at the other end of the brake shoe.

 

With respect to the tree incident, I'll bet Helen was a little jumpy!  Just glad she is doing well and could accompany you on your adventures!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, Without Helen I could not achieve any of the things that I accomplish. We both agree that we are exceptionally lucky with our combined lives, she turns 80 in a few days time* and I have just had my 82nd birthday. The Rapier, first registered in in England in 1935 is now 83 years old. It would have left the Lagonda Factory in 1934 as a completed chassis. Bodies as I am sure I have explained previously, were left for customer to choose a Coachbuilder and a body style.

The crucial factor that I failed to explain is that there is also an opposing taper  in the end of the plunger. This multiplies the effort exerted on the brake shoes

The adjustment is as you suggest at the other end of the brake shoes. This again shows some brilliant thinking on the part of its designer.The drawings, below, from my battered and much used copy of Practical Automobile Engineering shows this far better than mere words!

 

Bj. 

 

* I wonder how many other Eighty year old ladies would choose to drive for two or three hours in pouring rain, in an open car, The hood (top) carefully stowed away, from choice. Admittedly as any "enthusiast" can tell you, most if not all the rain goes over the windscreen and over the driver & passenger's head.

 

1339013292_GirlingBrakes.thumb.jpeg.d96ed4e384af535622872ebfc1b26ba1.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further to the above, as Helen will tell you, "You dress appropriately", as shown in this photo. Helen can take videos using her iPad but she is usually too busy Navigating. i.e.. Telling me where to go!  We use paper maps, electronic devises are generally not permitted in "competitive" events.

 

Bj

 

Re "Hoods"

Little Red Ridinghood always had  one attached to her favourite red winter overcoat.

 

857542712_HelenKG.thumb.jpg.7bb77a3af8698f89c31bd6fbb0d85f94.jpgDSCN5844.thumb.jpg.96b579cedcc54188dd31c5146b198ff1.jpg 

 

Some of you will have seen these photographs before. I am sorry if I am boring you all.

 

Bernie j

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people will tell you that it is sad that "cars" especially from the teens to the late thirties seem to dominate my life. That is certainly not sad for me and far from dominate my life those cars have expanded my life in so many ways. This Forum is a classic example but even beyond that these same cars have taken both of "us", H & I to places other people can only dream about and others have just not even thought about. Certainly we have not seen as much of the USA as perhaps we would like to but we have seen some of it and made lots of American Friends. Very much because of their English origins the cars that I have always been involved with, we have made numerous visits to the UK, likewise because of Helen's love of France and all things French we have an understanding that we try to spend the same amount of time in France as in England. Because we are very normal people living on an "Age Pension" we have had to restrict our "Over Seas" visits to once every five years. Fortunately I get a great deal of pleasure form working on "interesting cars" which means that I am able to do the bulk of the work on them myself. While I have absolutely no formal training in Engineering, necessity is a great teacher. Over the years I have owned a huge number of cars some only for days and none for as long as our present Lagonda Rapier. For me it ticks so many boxes I cannot think of another make or model that I would swap it for.  Right now I am having so much pleasure from preparing the Rapier for our next o/s trip with it. Our plans are starting to fall into place with the Fougeres Rally in Normandy, traditionally our first  French event taking place in May 2019. Allowing six to eight weeks for the car to reach the UK by sea means that "everything" must be done by March.  While that may seem a long way off these things have a nasty habit of creeping up if you do not keep an eye on them.  You can now simply sit back and watch. Hold on tight!

 

Bj.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To give you some idea of the remote country last weekends Rally took us through here is one typical photograph. Higher up there was still snow on some peaks and in the valleys. At one stage we were driving VERY SLOWLY through dense fog where all we had to guide us was the edge of the road directly beside the car. In many places there were no guide posts or safety barriers and a long drop into the valley below. Creeping along in first and second gear.

IMG_5037.thumb.JPG.4e0a43aceafab21e1327b679241813a5.JPG 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While waiting for the Rapier's brake shoes to be relined I thought that I should look at the rubber bushes at each end of the front shock absorbers (dampers). I certainly have not replaced these in the time that I have owned the car and looking at them it is possible that they have never been replaced in the past 80+ years.

 

 

 

DSCN6215.thumb.jpg.ebaf6a8ea1480f8fa8a3997d8a496bed.jpg

 

DSCN6216.thumb.jpg.3225aeb3034c8ae9c46d8f7b7d4fbf4f.jpg

 

Who was it that said that you cannot teach old dogs new tricks?

Well! I can tell you that they were 100% wrong. I am currently anong other things replacing the rubber bushes in the front Hartford (Friction) shock absorbers.
Now another trite saying is about assuming that I am sure you all know but it is worth repeating. To assume is to make an ASS out of you (U) and ME!

Putting all that aside I now know that for the particular model damper fitted to the Rapier does not use the "Silent Rubber" type bush with both a inner and outer steel tube. In fact they require a plain rubber bush with a separate steel inner tube pressed into the round ends of each arm. This is where the trap for young players is craftily concealed. What appears as being the outer steel tube in fact is a structural part of the arm and must not be removed. If this is done that end of the arm is considerably weakened.

Looking at them it appears to the uneducated eye that these are the "silent-rubber" type bush with the rubber insert bonded to both the inner and outer steel tube.

However as I have just learnt the outer steel tube is in fact a structural part of the arm and cannot be removed. Graham Brown of Vintage and Classic Shock Absorbers in England

(www.vintageandclassicshockabsorbers.co.uk) alerted me to the fact that any attempt to remove what appears to be the outer tube would be fatal. Considerably weakening the arm.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I am not a patient person by nature and sitting twiddling my thumbs is not something that I do very well. Meanwhile I have the car up on jack-stands with all four wheels and brakes off so it is firmly stuck in the middle of my little garage. Add to this the two front shock absorbers and my 'spare' gearbox in what looks like a million pieces on the bench. The more I think about it, the more I feel that I would be better served rebuilding the 'close ratio' gearbox which is still in the car. This will involve some extra work as I will need to replace the needle roller bearings in the planet gears for first and second gears. But the alternative is to wait  until we return later in the comming year to change over the gearbox (again) which does not sound very logical to me. Having said that I would sooner not start taking the "box" out of the car and pulling it apart until I have sorted out the current list of jobs to be done. I do have a set of  new, old material, bands I can use to rebuild the "spare" box and so clear that off the bench. 

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meanwhile being 2.45 Friday afternoon here in Australia, I have just telephoned the Brake Repair people, They could tell me that while my brake shoes etc are finished I will not be able to collect them until Monday.

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the status of the transmission bands? Also, I'd like to know if you think they could get held up in customs on the return shipment? I sold an auto part and sent it to Australia once and it seemed to take a very long time getting through customs.

 

I suppose your local "Brake People" could have done the transmission bands as well?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mike

Unfortunately the local "Brake People" do not know about Preselector gearbox bands These have been sent at great expense to England to one of the few firms prepared to tackle relining the gearbox bands. These have to be riveted as they have to live and work in a bath of oil. The recommended oil for preselector gear boxes is simple SAE 30 engine oil (without any additives). Because firstly these gearboxes were incredibly rugged with standing all sorts of abuses and secondly because most 1930s cars were simply not used between 1939 and 1946 ......

 

 

More to come tomorrow

 

Bj 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter Meyer the expert on ENV Trans in Germany has explained that he uses a pair of "Vice Grip" pliers to compress and hold the springs when assembling the "centralisers". He also uses a slightly diferent sequence in assemlinig these which should help. Only time will tell.

 

The bands themselves while they look simple, are in themselves quite complex. Todays photograph shows the friction surfaces of these two bands. This at first glance may sound misleading but for each gear the "Band" has two strips of friction material. after riveting they have to be ground internally to size and machined to aid the bedding-in process. This photograph shows one "band" finished and the other prior to machining. The metal part of the band is extremely complex. To date I have been unable to find a drawing that adequately shows its construction. Not only does the band have to contract sufficiently to stop the selected gear's drum from rotating it also has to self-adjust to compensate for wear. This is self-adjustment take place every time a gear is selected.  

It really is quite simple. I will let you look at the second photograph taken through the top of a gearbox and attempt to work out what is going on for your selves. For me to do it for you would take more than a page of typing to explain the action fully. *

Just don't let anyone tell you that Major Wilson was anything other than a brilliant engineer.

 

Bj.

* Having just looked at the relevant pages in the original Lagonda "Rapier Owners Handbook" I have found that there are almost 20 pages plus another eight pages of drawings devoted to the gear box. A bit too much to compress into one or two pages. 

Please don't go away, it is just that we may have to do this one thing at a time. There are some good photographs in there that I can share with you, that is if you really want to continue down this path?

 

DSCN6229.thumb.jpg.fc31855973e2a656f07d89106e454612.jpg

 

DSCN5918.thumb.jpg.105ac095653f8320ea3cb17f9d4a62f0.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now