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Getting back to our Lagonda Rapier, for some time I have been concerned, the black fabric tonneau cover was looking very faded and shabby to the extent that while we have not been using the car I felt that a new one would be required to bring the car's appearance up to an acceptable standard.  The rest of the car was also looking very dusty and unloved. As a result I decided that even though unused for three or four months It was in need of a wash. Accordingly I started it up and backed it out of the carport, filled a bucket with warm water along with a generous splash of Meguiar's "wash and wax" that I had bought to use on Helen's now ten year old dark red VW Jetta. I gave the Rapier's tonneau a good scrubbing and washed it off with a blast of high pressure cold water. First I was expecting that the rinse water would be dirty but to just say dirty would be an under statement. Now that it has dried any thought of replacing the tonneau has gone, it is now again a nice deep black and would not attract a second, derisive, glance at any concours. What ever is in the Synthetic Polymer Technology it has transformed "KG's" tonneau.  Normally I would not write in such glowing terms about any car care product but I felt that the dramatic change in the Rapier's tonneau was worth a mention.DSCN5987.jpg.f99c2c13152971136292ff808df2b561.jpg

 

Anyone puzzled about the "Patch" on the tonneau, this is the sports car equivalent of those leather "elbow patches" on an ageing "Gentleman's" tweed jacket. With no door on the drivers side this is where I place my hand to lever myself out of the seat.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Here is  a little quiz for all the British Car people,

Who can identify this historic place.

Next items are three cars the Make and if you are really clever, the models?21b30096-16c2-46c2-9383-854b41c4cb92.jpg.e481a3c01a8d364acbeb570a41775192.jpgbf95f350-3a6d-4ec7-adc2-157713af5d2f.jpg.def62f4975d919d92b2bcb52f5b52a9a.jpg3feb5994-1036-47d9-8224-bc9638da9d25.jpg.97f01c197a1b114ee07a455b3ec800e8.jpg7b0319ef-6c15-4fbd-8491-02e434b3d079.jpg.225822bc2be11ee9a2f67e60e11aba77.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Regarding the "Blue" car (Number 163) in my previous post, of particular interest is the rear suspension. For a Bonus Ten points. What is the suspension medium and what is going on with the builders thought process? You may need to use more than one or two words to explain.

Bj.

 

53562

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Maybe Brooklands for the location.

For the blue car the best guess I could make is an Alvis special for racing. Apart from it being cantilevered up at an angle rather then the usual horizontal, and no obvious shock absorbers, I can't see what may be of particular interest.

The red car is a Morris/Wolseley special.

The last looks American to me, Willys Overland?

Matthew

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Hi Mathew

You are correct with the venue as Brooklands, The Blue car is more likely to be an ERA, The Red Car a supercharged MG possibly a K3 but the bonnet looks too long so perhaps a 6 cylinder, NE. The last is an American but this time a 4 Cylinder Dodge Brothers.  A lot of Dodges were sent to France towards the end of WW1 as American "Staff Cars", but not this one which is mid to late 1920s.

 

OnSafari 

THe Red Brick Building on the right of the photograph is the "give away" This is the original early 1900s "Club-house'". Certainly a Frazer Nash would have an outside right hand "gear-change" or perhaps more correctly "chain-change" HRG's came a little later in the 1930s. The G is from Godfrey,  the G in GN, i.e. Godfrey and Nash. The HR are his initials after the partnership split up, one partner going off to become part of Frazer Nash, the other to start HRG. 

Bj.

Explaining the acute angle of the 1/4 eliptic rear springs on the Blue car is going to be a little more difficult. It is all about enhancing "down forces" to improve traction and limit wheel spin. Basically the torque reaction is pushing the rear wheels down onto the track to help eliminate wheels spin. 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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14 hours ago, oldcar said:

Hi Mathew

You are correct with the venue as Brooklands, The Blue car is more likely to be an ERA, The Red Car a supercharged MG possibly a K3 but the bonnet looks too long so perhaps a 6 cylinder, NE. The last is an American but this time a 4 Cylinder Dodge Brothers.  A lot of Dodges were sent to France towards the end of WW1 as American "Staff Cars", but not this one which is mid to late 1920s.

 

OnSafari 

THe Red Brick Building on the right of the photograph is the "give away" This is the original early 1900s "Club-house'". Certainly a Frazer Nash would have an outside right hand "gear-change" or perhaps more correctly "chain-change" HRG's came a little later in the 1930s. The G is from Godfrey,  the G in GN, i.e. Godfrey and Nash. The HR are his initials after the partnership split up, one partner going off to become part of Frazer Nash, the other to start HRG. 

Bj.

Explaining the acute angle of the 1/4 eliptic rear springs on the Blue car is going to be a little more difficult. It is all about enhancing "down forces" to improve traction and limit wheel spin. Basically the torque reaction is pushing the rear wheels down onto the track to help eliminate wheels spin. 

 

The Dodge is probably 1924, the first year for a major restyle and the first year for hood (bonnet) louvres and also the last year for the 24" wheels. Subsequent models had 20" wheels.

 

I visited Brooklands in 2014. Unfortunately it was February and the weather was typical British winter, sunny but cold on the first visit and wet when I went back the next day.  Alan Wynn the manager is a friend of a friend and I spoke to him briefly.  I believe the Wellington shed in my photo has now been moved.  It was only after I had left that I realised I didn't go for a walk up the test hill. As interesting mix in your clubhouse shot - a VSCC meet I presume. 

IMG_0581 (1024x768).jpg

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Hello NZCN

I can only imagine that the Photo of the cars in front of the Clubhouse was taken at last years Double Twelve event.

We, my wife Helen, the Rapier and I, have been visiting the UK and Europe every five years for some time now. I think it is much better to go les often but to stay longer. Usually for three months, our longest stay was for five months. 

That way we can amortise the cost of shipping the car over the longer, three month, period. It probably works out about the same as hiring a modern car for a similar period of time.  The big benefit is that we do not feel out of place and can join in at events. I have been a member of the VSCC in the UK since 1983. In France we have participated in the Fougeres Rally on every visit and have got to know quite a few people. We have found that by entering "local" rallies we get to meet people and go to places that the normal tourist in a hire car would never do.

 

Bj

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Hello Bernie

As far as I am aware all the ERA's had semi elliptic rear suspension. These cars are all pretty well documented and in the E.R.A. club's Significant Changes in Specification by Chassis there is no mention of any having quarter elliptics. However if I claim they never had quarter elliptics like this someone shall produce a photo to prove one did.  I have found a photo on this page :-

http://www.postwarclassic.com/magazine/press-releases/the-vintage-sports-car-club-announces-the-2018-formula-vintage-speed-championship-calendar-033937-2.html

It enlarges to show a car with carbs and exhaust on the same side which also rules out ERA. It is amazing what google can do.

 

Is the Dodge the same as that sold here as a 'Fast Four'?

 

Matthew

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Of course you are correct Matthew, when you see the full side view it is clear that the car has three carbs making it in all probability a six cylinder. Some more research in indicated.

I think that that Dodge is mid 1920s the Fast Four came towards the end of both the 1920s and the four cylinder Dodges. It is quite some time since I last owned a Dodge 4 and I am sure that there are people out there who know the Dodge story far better than I.

A very long time ago I wrote a short story about a mythical attempt to run a Dodge 4 at Le Mans.

 

Bj.

 

 

%22Le Mans%22 Dodge005.jpg

 

763039868_22LeMans22Dodge006.jpg.1ab990c2f1bd2fe60badf1a2656cf1e7.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Bernie,

 

I hope Helen's recovery from her hip surgery is going well. Hopefully she will be ready for touring in the Lagonda when Spring comes to the Southern Hemisphere. Please tell her hello from your friends on the AACA forum!

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Just to remind myself what this thread is all about and being a nice crisp early winter's day I have just taken some new photographs of our Rapier. Now is a chance for other owners to show us their cars.DSCN6013.jpg.f198026dd134c52facb238c03c773d70.jpgDSCN6018.jpg.8a475b8352696921e15baf5dcf1d2917.jpgDSCN6019.jpg.2cb09979145874fb58258eae7b760bf4.jpgDSCN6016.jpg.3fb8998f8ceb0d71605f67b76b7e1000.jpg

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Observant people will have noticed the "Reserve" tap below the petrol pump. This has two pipes coming from the petrol tank. Again the Rapiers system is just a little different. With the tap in the "Main" position the pump is drawing fuel through BOTH pipes. With the tap turned to the reserve position the pipe picking up fuel via the "main" pipe 

that draws petrol from some inches above the bottom of the tank is closed and the pump continues to draw fuel via the  reserve pipe from the bottom of the tank. Both pipes have inline filters at the rear of the car close to the petrol tank , there is another filter in the actual pump and finally there are two small conical filters incorporated in the banjo fittings at the entry to the Carb float bowls.

There is a "back up" electric pump under the car in the "reserve" pipe. This pump is controlled by a switch on the dash-board directly (below the amp-meter). When switched on this pump runs continuously with any excess petrol being returned to the tank via the main pipe. Both the petrol tank fitting and the reserve tap are original equipment.

 

At the time when the car was new Gentlemen would have referred to this system as "Belt and Braces".

or as my  American friends would say Suspenders. Please do ask me to explain, either you understand or you don't.

 

Bernie j.

DSCN6023.jpg.a0f9b02f023978da1130e878d7f62bfe.jpgDSCN6024.jpg.b24dbdbcd4318637fd7314a316cf1125.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Well! That one went over like a lead balloon.............

 

Bj.

 

Perhaps you are all super cautious people who always wear a belt with your Bib and Brace overalls too.

I seem to be making a habit of offending sensitive people, perhaps I should just give up while I am (I think) in front. 

or  should I draw a series of "flow" diagrams for you?

54083.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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More on "Belt & Braces"

For all the people who are still failing to see the humour in that expression, your search engine (Google) will explain it fully! One, admittedly British, web site even giving you the meaning in Chinese. Good luck!

 

Bernie j.

One other suggestion to assist in stopping your trousers (Pants) from falling down is to put both hands into the relevant pockets and hold on.

Then to even confuse you further, I am reminded about the poor fellow whose breath came in short pants.

 

Just keep smiling and nod occasionally.......

 

Bj.

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13 hours ago, oldcar said:

More on "Belt & Braces"

For all the people who are still failing to see the humour in that expression, your search engine (Google) will explain it fully! One, admittedly British, web site even giving you the meaning in Chinese. Good luck!

 

Bernie j.

One other suggestion to assist in stopping your trousers (Pants) from falling down is to put both hands into the relevant pockets and hold on.

Then to even confuse you further, I am reminded about the poor fellow whose breath came in short pants.

 

Just keep smiling and nod occasionally.......

 

Bj.

 

You've got me chuckling Bernie....over here we call them "Belt and Suspenders"

 

Yes, smiling and nodding......makes them wonder what you are up to.

Frank

 

Oh, and nice dog!

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21093281.jpg.8bafa11bab8832c695eba59f4eae4ba5.jpg

Hello Frank

The occasional "Nod" of the head can sometimes be interpreted as a sign of approval or perhaps acquiescence, other times it is a sign that the person is about to or has already fallen to sleep.  

Yet again, some other people can be best described as "Noddies" as in Enid Blytons stories.

Life is what you make it.

 

As I said earlier, Keep smiling and Nod occasionally. Most importantly, don't worry. 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Further to the above; It could also be said that some people, notably some Australians, can exhibit certain signs linked either directly or indirectly to a warped sense of humour.

Life is also said to be too short!

 

Bj

.Unknown.jpeg.01f6323174e1e42e66105ea1cca876d9.jpeg 

54172

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Thinking about this strange affliction, it could well be confined to those whose childhood was restricted by the advent of World War Two. 

A period when children were very much restricted with toys being mainly home made and "mend and make do" was very much the rule for young lives. I was about 10 or 11 when I got my Airedale,  just about the best "toy" I ever had.

For people who have never learnt to add or subtract, I was born in 1936.

If you still have all ten fingers you should be able to work that out.

 

Bj. 

Unknown.jpeg.1692702013f6c256087ab0ed1a2df128.jpeg

54194.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, oldcar said:

I was about 10 or 11 when I got my Airedale,  just about the best "toy" I ever had.

 

The bond between a boy and his dog.......there is nothing else like it. I fondly remember the dogs of my childhood.

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Bernie,

Can I assume that the extra pump underneath is not original? When I saw the high mounted SU pump on the Rapier it reminded me of a 47 Rover we had that used to suffer from vapour lock in summer , due partly to that high mounted sucking pump! And the ability to return excess fuel to the tank - surely thats not original?

Rover implemented a reserve fuel electrically, via a solenoid at the tank, which closed off the normal supply pipe, and opened the pipe going right to the bottom.

jp 26 Rover 9

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