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Resale values


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#1 Luv2Wrench

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 10:26 PM

While searching a warehouse for another car, I stumbled across a pile of parts that were described as 'a whole 1911 Metz, except for the seat'.
I was immediately intrigued because I really like the prewar cars and the Metz is local. The car appears to be a Model 22 (there is 4 cylinder engine in the center of the pile). The owner says it is a 'roadster' and the front cowl does look like some of the pictures at MetzAuto.com.
Long story short, my enjoyment of restoring old cars is the act of restoration. After it is done the car must be sold to make room for a new project. I am not really in a position that I can lose money on each car so I try to pick ones with good resale value. I've tried to find some resell numbers for the Metz but it has been quite difficult. A post here on aaca.org says they don't go for much because the friction drive makes them impractical. I saw an auction where it appeared a 1912 Model 22 went $30K. I haven't found much else. Any ideas?

Cheers

#2 MochetVelo

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 10:46 PM

If assembled and mostly complete, an unrestored Metz 22 should be worth in the $7500-9500 range. You probably refer to the Metz 22 sold by RM at Hershey last year that went for $30,800. That car was running, but an older "non-concours" restoration. After you restore the car, it should bring at least $15,000-20,000. Remember, the Metz was a low-priced car like the Model T, but it was and is a practical, well-made car. I'm restoring one now (see it under the "Our Cars & Restorations" heading).

Phil

#3 Luv2Wrench

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 11:48 PM

Thanks for the info. I am well aware of your project, that was another reason I was immediately interested in the car. I've read through your project with great interest since I joined.
I think I will go back and see just how many of the parts are really there. I have some photos to go by so I should be able to get a pretty accurate idea. I might be owning a Model 22 real soon. :)

#4 MochetVelo

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 12:32 AM

The Metz Gathering will be at Waltham July 9th. You'll see some Metz cars there, I'm sure.


Phil

#5 prs519

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 02:52 AM

How is it that the Metz had such a great reputation for hill-climbing; yet, I occasionaly see
indictiments against its' clutch. Shouln't these be mutually inclusive properties. Maybe it was
the ability of the clutch to slip that made it such a hill-climber? One of the first torque converters,
do ya reckon?
Perry in Idaho

#6 cben09

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:24 PM

The widely varing ratio and not the slipping ,,is the key to climbing a hill,,Cheers,,Ben

#7 Mochet

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:00 AM

If you've been following the auctions since your original posting, Metz cars seem to have done pretty well. This past month, two Metz cars sold: a quite original unrestored 1913 model "22" at Bonhams for about $32,000 and a 1910 two-cylinder for $49,500 at RM. In 2010, the RM Hershey sale saw a 1912 Metz "22" go for $30,800. The latter was an older, not-so-great resto. Overall, the Metz cars seem to do quite well.

Phil




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