Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Sometimes things are going well, eh, almost. I had fears to install the steering column because the screws attaching it to the dash are pointing towards the floor and the heads are almost invisible. By putting the model on its side, the situation was not so bad. Once the steering shaft was inserted into the steering box, the assembly was rather stable and I could install the supporting bracket without too many difficulties and without damaging the paint. All is good? Well, not exactly: when the wheels were positioned for a straight drive, the steering wheel was wrong by 180°. At first, I wanted to let it that way, but I did not like that idea. To remove the column was out of question; I tried to remove the steering wheel inside. Finally, I could turn it a half turn and now it’s the way it should. The movement from the wheel to the steering shaft is done with a tiny steel screw. Obviously, this screw will break if too much effort is required. As it’s not a toy and will be seldom “used”, I can live with that.

And now? Another fear: soldering the wires from the LH door to the board seen on the picture…Anyway, the number of parts lying in the display cabinet is slowly diminishing!

 

1034 Installed steering column.JPG

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If the wires soldering went rather well, the result was not what I expected: during the function test, I noticed that when lowering the RH door window from the master switch, the RH quarter window went up! What was wrong? Wiring problem, a short somewhere? When I noticed that by pulling the switch without much force, the quarter window was not moving. Conclusion: something was not quite good in the master switch.

I don’t like to open again doors, but I had no choice. Fortunately, my construction is rather service friendly, the switch can be separated without too much hassle. I just had to unbend a contact, bend a bit more another one and voilà, all windows are going up and down as intended!

 

1035 door wiring.JPG

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Roger

With all the bumps in the road you come through the winner. That is half of what makes me come back. Steering or wiring nothing can be half way it has to be right, you one amazing craftsman. 

Thanks for the ride along.

Nelson 

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Once the wiring was ready, it was time to hide it under the carpet. I don’t have large hands, but working into the model is not especially easy. I had to shorten the LH kick panel at the bottom. Once in place the question was if I could attach it to the body with the 2 foreseen screws? The slot on those screws is not very deep and the position of the screwdriver is very impractical. First, I searched with a tiny drill bit if the foreseen holes would correspond with the attaching brackets at the body. I did not believe it, but they did! Usually, a couple of seconds is needed to tighten those screws if the setting is right; here I had maybe one hour. For 2 screws!

 

The next step was the seat installation. It was already in the model, I saw no difficulties and it would be done rather quickly. Unfortunately, the reality was very different: I had 3 afternoons to install it! The seat is attached with 4 bolts inserted from under the body. They have to go through the carpet into the nuts from the seat rails. When the seat is into the car, the sight is just zero. So, I prepared 4 studs long enough to go through the carpet and the floor; the studs were screwed into the seat tracks. When one was emerging at the underbody, I secured it with a nut, pushing then on the seat to let the remaining go through the holes. Then, I undid the studs one after the other to use the foreseen bolts. I managed to break one bolt, requiring the removal of the seat to remove the broken bit. After a second similar adventure, I realized that the carpet was the culprit because the attaching points are offset, putting too much stress on the bolts. What to do? The removal of the carpet under the track was out of question; I should have removed the whole carpet but the door scuff plates were glued on the body and the carpet in sandwiched between the scuff plates and body. I did 4 spacers and began again the installation. I just saw that with the spacers the studs were now too short. OK, 4 new longer studs are quickly made. With longer studs the pre-installation of the seat should be easier because I could more or less see the holes on the floor, but it was not! One stud had no envy to go where I wanted, even with some persuasion and chosen words. Finally I was stronger and I could install the bolts. Success! Well, not exactly: the seat was lower on one side. Nevertheless, I tried to install the seat motor. It is attached to the floor with 4 nuts. 2 went well, but 2 could not be screwed in most probably because too much paint was on the thread.

The seat had to come out once again. This time, I checked the distance between the attaching points; it was about 1 mm too narrow, maybe the frame was deformed when I tried to insert the studs. I did the correction which was easy as all was soft soldered. At the same time, I cleaned the threads for the motor.

New tentative: the studs can now be inserted with ease and the motor is now correctly attached. I had the pleasure to see that the seat was functioning; the seat was at the same “altitude” on both sides, but it was crooked! The seat came out again, but the motor stayed in place. I corrected the tracks to have them square and installed the seat again. Once the connecting rod from the motor was definitively attached to the seat, I could close that chapter!

Finally, I put the decal representing the patent plate (Fomoco designation).

 

Practically, the main body is ready with the exception of the windshield and back window, plus the associated chromed parts. The next step will be the inserting of the door strap links, if I can do that. It will be similar to catch a fly with closed eyes: the hole for the shaft is barely visible; see the arrow at the last picture. Maybe I will have to plan a long installation time!

1036 Front carpet.JPG

1037 Rear seat installed.JPG

1038 With front seat.JPG

1039 Front seat.JPG

1040 Patent plate.JPG

1041 Tight space.JPG

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Previously, I told that the curent will be supplied by external batteries through the filler pipe from the tank. This is how I can test the electrical part. As that device is rather crude for the moment, I did not show it. Later, when it will look better than now!

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Roger

You are the best and I can almost see the light at the end of the tunnel. Your build has just about come to a close and it has all been exciting seeing you overcome one obstacle after another. Nothing stopped you even time and we were ably to enjoy it all. I am kind of regretting the completion but for you one more masterpiece down. Most beautiful works.

Nelson 

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Frankly, I was not very optimistic about the strap links. To maximise the chance of success, I did a cone at the pin to facilitate the insertion, assuming that the hole from the link would more or less align with the ones from the pillar. I also silver soldered a strap at the other end of the pin for the same purpose. After a while, the pin & strap disappeared into the pillar! It will stay here: to rescue it, I should remove the dash, which is out of question.

I did a new pin and strap, this time longer as to be able to guide it with the hand. On the RH side, I could see the link when I illuminating the place with a torch. After a while and many tentatives, the pin went into the catch! I cut the excess from the strap and glued the remaining to the body. It was time to go to the other side. Even if I tried to construct the body the same way both sides, I saw nothing at the LH hole. After some hours, suddenly the pin went into the link! Again, some glue secured the strap. The LH is less effective than the RH; anyway, now I can have open doors without holding them. And, as intended, the doors are held at two distinct positions as you can see on the pictures.

Now, I can “play” with the front clip.

1042 max opening.JPG

1043 medium opening.JPG

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Well...I put the car upside down and shuttled it. Nothing came out, but it's not the first time. Usually there are nuts or screws which disappear! It's like a real car: usually, the owner or mechanics find later strange things!

  • Haha 1

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