Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Thanks to all who tried to find the error. As just two persons really found it, I will not redo the parts.

Now, the explanation: if you look at the points and lions (or whatever animal), there are 3 in the bottom and only 2 in the upper field. From design, the fields have the same dimensions but I did an error when I fabricated the part: due to the angle from the trunk lid, the horizontal bar from the emblem is not symmetrical for optical reasons. It could be that the edge from the horizontal bar is not in the middle of the emblem, but a tad lower. At the model, the "square" with the decal is also a tad too low compared to the circle, aggravating the situation.

Finally, the decal itself was not done correctly: the space occupied from the cross was neglected. I gave the OK for the decals when I was in vacation and I missed that point too. To be honest, I'm not sure to have catch this error if the proof would have been checked at home.

 

I hope that my explanation can be understood...Foreign language is sometimes difficult...

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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It's still amazing workmanship Roger no matter what. To fabricate an entire car from scratch in that scale is a major undertaking and very few can do it. I applaud your quality and attention to detail. 

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Roger,  

 

No one is going to "spot" the error with the trunk emblem.  Even a Ford employee of the day would miss that due to the fact that the whole car - - - er- - - model  has so much detail.  You would have to be the designer on the original Continental to catch that mistake.  It is such a small error in the whole scope of this fine model.  Do not loose any sleep over it as it will go unnoticed to the admiring eye.

 

Randy

 

P.S.  I have the generator and the starter on my bench overhauling them.  after cleaning them up, I  am replacing the bushing in the front and the ball bearing in the rear of the generator shaft.  I have chucked the armature in my lathe and turned down the commutator and am replacing the brushes.  That will make the generator new again.  Plus paint.  Now on to the starter. Same procedure.  Those are much easier than the tasks that you have at hand.  Pictures are to come in the near future.   

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To complete the discussion about the trunk emblem, I put it upside down! The animals are walking at the ceiling...But, like Randy wrote, nobody will notice, that major flaw will be "washed" with the other details from the model. At least, there is no major error at the emblem in the horn ring center. Due to the size, I'm putting 2 pictures, one with and the other without the flash.

979 Horn ring.JPG

980 Horn ring.JPG

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Boy that is a big pair of pliers. Very nice work. It always excites me to see the change between raw and painted parts and as the little frilly bits are added, like decals etc. Xclnt work!

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You may wonder what this construction on the frame does mean…Oh, by the way, the engine is on the frame; the fuel line is connected to the fuel pump and both hoses from the steering box are connected to the steering pump. I will shortly do nice (I hope) pictures from that assembly.

Back to that strange thing. It’s never late to do the last parts, sometimes it would be more wire to do them sooner when the parts are not yet painted. Well, sometimes my planning is not the best, this is the latest example: the complex rod which connects the gas pedal to the car relay was not yet done. It is attached to the body but if I’m putting the body on the frame, I will have no chance to do something. Therefore, I did that jig with the hope that the critical dimensions are reflecting the body. I will notice it when the body is coming definitively on the frame.

 

The various sub-assemblies coming to the firewall are installed. I have to do it now because, once the body is on the frame, the engine will prevent the use of a tool for the various screws. It will make the assembly to the frame rather difficult; I see no other method.

981 jig.JPG

982 jig.JPG

983 jig.JPG

984 with accessories.JPG

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Even after all this time and becoming desensitized, seeing it together like that it is just as overwhelming as the day I saw him make that first tire.   Which reminds me... those tires are nearly 8 years old so I think Roger should be mindful when cruising at high speeds. :)

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Roger,

 

Great, great work, Roger.  If one did not see the beginning of this saga, they would not have a clue as to how this Continental came to be.

 

As all have attested,  this stage of the model is inspiring to see all of those components that we saw you make from the beginning, coming together,  is like the puzzle.  You start with the border, advancing to assembling the different sections of the picture and before you know it, the last piece of the puzzle is put in place.

 

To think that the linkage will be attached to the body is mind boggling.  Just to make this model with all the components like the 1:1  car and then to ATTACH them where one cannot even get a tool between the firewall and the engine is beyond amazement.  We would like a video of you doing the attachment, (maybe not the sound with all the cursing going on :-)   )  seeing how you accomplish that task.  How the small rods and cable linkages attach is a wonder.   Take plenty of pictures at this stage.  Each will tell a story of a thousand words.  Baffling ! !  
 

That day is coming when the car will be complete.  From here on in, I will be watching raptly for every post, seeing what has been assembled next.
 

 

Randy 

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Thanks Randy!

Forget the video: during difficult tasks, I want to be alone. As mother nature did not gave me 3 or 4 hands, I don't see how I could do that. With a support for the camera? I'm afraid that it will disturb more than help and you may only see hands and fingers.

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Before I’m going too deep with the windows wiring, I wanted to test it as I was not too confident in my design. To my relief, all is functioning as expected with one minor issue: the vent windows are not opening like I wanted by pulling the buttons on the driver door. On the passenger door, the action of the button is correct. I will have to switch 2 wires at the driver’s door.

The wires in the trunk are now in place; the wire for the tail lamps is already in the passenger compartment, ready to be connected at the switch. The main positive wire is already connected at the rear window motors, from there, another positive wire will be added for the front of the car.

 

985 Testing the windows.JPG

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What Roger?

 

No video crew at your front door to do a video of you sweating and contorting with the mating of the body to the chassis?  What fun is that?   JUST KIDDING.

How you are keeping all of the assembly components in order and working as you do the assembly is, as always, boggling !

We all hope that all goes well with the assembly of the electrical.  I hope that "Murphy's Law" is not present as you do this very intricate, complicated task.  

What size batteries are you going to use for operation of the electrical?  Two "D" batteries or  ?  I am guessing that the box holding the batteries will be finished as a large battery.

I could use you here in wiring my engine test stand as the Pontiac wiring schematic is for an engine IN the car.  It isn't that complicated but........nothing like an engineer to sort out the particulars.  For example, I am using an ammeter vs. the "gen light" that is in my instrument panel.  I am assuming that I have to wire it into the generator outlet lead to pick up what the generator is producing?  Being DC, it is not that complicated and I will figure it out.  Electrical is not my strong suit.  But the early automotive electrical is much easier than what is presented today in these modern marvels.

 

I also lucked out.  One of our Pontiac club members came across my missing link.  I finally landed my hands on a 1936 Harrison Radiator that is correct for my car. It is now being re cored and I should have it back next week so I can install it on my test stand, hook up the hoses, fill the cooling system and get ready for my engine start.  I hope that I can post a video of the engine start up and running. 

 

I spent a lot of time building this engine stand but as I said in my previous post, it is better to run the engine in before it is installed.  

 

Do you have a lot of members in the European car groups that come to you for component work on their cars?  Seems that you do a lot of Hydramatic  transmission rebuilds.    And I bet when you are done with them, they are.......................................perfect.

 

Randy

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Oh! there are unexpected glitches; they will be corrected one by one, if possible. Some are appearing because not all elements were installed together before the paint/upholstery.

I can make my way with simple electrical tasks; if I have no schematic, I could not install an ammeter.

As we have different designation for batteries, I cannot tell which one I'm using. Just the large 1.5V round ones.

 

Fortunately, I don't have too many people coming to me for repairing components. I'm only doing 1956-64 Hydramatics and I'm not searching the cases. It seems that I'm known for that!

 

Today, I did some pictures from the frame and engine. What I still don't understand: my small and old pocket camera is making clearer pictures than the Canon reflex camera I bought one year ago...I'm including 2 pictures with the Canon at the end; you will see the difference.

986 Frame.JPG

987 Frame.JPG

988 Frame.JPG

998 Frame.JPG

999 Frame.JPG

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Roger....I gotta tell you that there is absolutely NO INDICATION that the frame and other components are actually a model and not a life size car. FANTASTIC work!

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