Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Roger,

 

To the Englishman's comments.  I owned several English cars.  My first was a 1960 MGA 1600.  Even though Morris Garage had an Italian designer revamp the body into a striking sports car, it still was sitting on the MG frame, engine and electrics.  The first lesson in Lucas Electrics is:  that it is a constant lesson.  But it was a fun car when it ran.  In 2005, I found a restoration shop here in San Diego who was completing a 1960 MGA 1600 Roadster.  The difference between this car and the first was that the latter was better than a new car coming off of the assembly line.  I won many awards with that car as it was a 100 point car.  But still, there was always something to attend to...................

 

As a former owner of several early 70's Jaguar XJ6s, I really loved that car line.  For the most part, they were of sound design.  Where they had trouble was trying to get them altered to comply with the smog laws coming onto the scene in the US.  Prior to 1974, my 73 XJ6 ran like a sewing machine.  I loved working on that car.  It was a chore (but doable) to adjust the Stromberg   carbs.  Adjusting the valve clearances with tappet shims, adjusting the timing and dwell were all part of an occasional  Saturday that I enjoyed. When I was done, what a sense of accomplishment to have that car purr like a cat!  AND the car rode like a dream. 

 

Not big and boxy like the American cars or big and heavy like the Rolls Royce or Mercedes but nimble and agile.  Sitting in the cockpit ensconced in Connaly  hides, wool carpeting and burlwood dash trim. There was an "aroma" to a Jaguar.  There wasn't a better hi way car made.   If you ever owned or drove one for any period of time, you will know what I mean.  My 74XJ6  and 75 XJ6C were beautiful machines but Lucas's foray into electronic ignition wasn't so hot.  (Left me on the side of the road several times till I changed out the distributor for an aftermarket specialty company who addressed that issue).  Jags and Rolls Royces were not make like the rest of the English cars. They were quality in materials and workmanship.  Fit and finish were paramount to Jaguar.  Their lines are classic even to this day.     

 

US smog laws practically killed the Jag in the late seventies.  And the poor XJ12.  We won't even start on that one. The British engineers just didn't have a clue about overheating issues.  Hot weather and 12s just didn't mix.  Jaguar was rescued by Ford and further improved when Tata acquired  Jaguar.  A beautiful car today. 

 

Now most of the cars going down the road (except for a few) all look alike.  You have to get up close to read the badge on the hood or the script on the rear of the car to know what you are looking at.  Not like the 50's when we could identify a car by its grill, body shape, trunk etc., etc.   You certainly could identify a Continental cruising down the road.  Magnificent and stately.  Fit for a King or Queen.  

 

It is nice that you are modeling that car.  Elegant and classy.

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Obviously you know English cars better than me! I don't doubt that you had pleasure with the ones you had. My remark about the English industry was certainly biased with my Vauxhall experience; not everything coming from there was bad, this was not my point! However, with the help of the unions, the industry disappeared. Only when foreign manufacturers bought the best makes, they could survive...

 

Another small remark: the US smog laws almost killed his domestic industry too (plus the bad product quality). When I began the job with US cars in 1988 or 89, so many engines would stall without reason. This period was really not fun, having to deal with frightened/disappointed/furious customers. Fortunately, things improved in the nineties!

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Another important step towards the completion: the door jambs and inner front fender are painted. I'm attaching a picture of my spray booth. After the paint session, I cleaned the kitchen myself. I did also several other small parts with the same blue paint. The same will be done to the main body: firewall, trunk lid gutter, A and B pillars. I have first to correct a rocker panel which is not good.

 

927 Spray booth.JPG

928 Paint.JPG

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Roger,

 

Wow.  We are getting close to seeing the car painted!  It won't be too long before the car is assembled and all the elements are applied, bringing your years of toil to fruition.   Exciting times in the Continental's construction.

 

Randy

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Indeed both rocker panels were not so good. To improve them, I had to rework the lower quarter panels…A never ending story!

Now, there is one step more towards the painting of the body by putting a blue coat in the door’s apertures, firewall and trunk gutter. The temptation is great to install some elements on the firewall, but I will leave the body for a couple of days until the paint is fully dry.

 

 

 

929 Masking the body.JPG

930 Spray booth.JPG

931 Painted firewall.JPG

932 Painted firewall.JPG

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Just lobbed in to the page where the firewall etc. have been painted. This is an amazing venture!

Where do I go to get the "back story" on the creation/building of this model?

Thank you.

RB

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Thank you Laughingcoyote.

I'm new here and I coulda, woulda, shoulda done that "clicking" as you suggest but I was afraid I'd somehow lose the thread and perhaps the whole site. That has happened to me so many times with interesting sites that I've accidentally stumbled upon -- such as happened to me with this one.

I suppose I should also say "Thanks" for making me stay up all tonight in order to read all this fascinating material!

RB

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9 hours ago, Reg Bruce said:

 

I suppose I should also say "Thanks" for making me stay up all tonight in order to read all this fascinating material!

RB

In fact, I should say "thank you" if you are reading this post since the beginning!

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16 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Love the colour and I like your choice of newspaper!

Thanks Spinneyhill! You probavly remember that the color's choice was not so easy. It seems I was lucky: most people like it and me too!

The newspaper I used is the sole weekly automotive paper from Switzerland, edited in French and German. As a French speaking guy, I'm getting the thinner (compared to the German issue) French version...but I have enough to mask the kitchen!

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18 hours ago, countrytravler said:

Did they make a convertible?

 

Officially no. If you read the text from Barry Wolk under the ad, you will understand that Ford let rework two damaged cars as convertibles. Over the time, some body shops converted coupes into convertibles. In short: there were no production convertibles.

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The paint drying time is a good opportunity to finish some details, for example the bumpers for the rear axle. I did not do them when I was busy with the frame because the exact location was unknown. Over time, the rear axle U bolts did a marking at the primer; I had therefore the exact location! I wanted to have rubber bumpers; the question was how to let stick the silicone rubber on the mounting plates? I expected that some hooks soldered to the plates would help the rubber to stay in place. Then I did two negative forms (in front of the frame on the picture) and tried to mix a product I have since 40 years: the Stylgard from Dow Corning; which I used to do the Toronado tires. Would it still be good? To my surprise, yes! To facilitate the curing, I heated the mold, rubber and mounting plate to about 100°C for 5 minutes and I got both bumpers.

 

933 axle bumoers.JPG

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On 1/19/2018 at 8:14 PM, Reg Bruce said:

Just lobbed in to the page where the firewall etc. have been painted. This is an amazing venture!

Where do I go to get the "back story" on the creation/building of this model?

Thank you.

RB

Go back to page 1 a from March 2010 and start reading. Rodger has a talent of a real craftsman and spot on.

Nelson

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Roger,

 

Just got out of the Surgery Center here in La Jolla CA yesterday.  I had my right shoulder "overhauled"  He removed a large bone spur and re attached torn ligaments to the rotator cuff.  It should be a painful recovery but ......I am pain free !   My surgeon pioneered (at a much younger age) the arthroscopic surgery procedure back in the late 80's.  He, like you and me, is grey haired and "seasoned" That is why they call it a "Medical Practice"  Always practicing.  :-)  24 hours later, I am typing.  I have a shoulder brace on but my hands are free for typing and use. 

I won't be lifting my arm for a while but when I recover, I will have my arm back as good as new.  Modern Medicine.  Voila.  

 

The rear axle bumpers look great!  Roger, you don't miss any detail.  The steady progress that you are making on the Continental is something that I look forward to every time I log on to AACA.  

 

Randy

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Randy, glad you could save your shoulder!

It goes further with details. I’m now at the brake and fuel lines. Those details are time consuming, will be unseen unless the model is on the roof. I noticed that I need both frame and body to check for the clearance; it’s better to do those details now, before the body is painted. The A(C lines will also be added, otherwise the dryer attached to the frame will be a non-sense.

I will also add the large vacuum hoses; the small ones will be skipped.

 

The “large” long black hose emerging from the frame will be shortened in due time; it’s the hose connecting the booster/master cylinder to the outlet fitting. The line in the background in the first picture is a failed tentative.

 

934 brake main line.JPG

935 Brake line.JPG

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Beautiful work, Roger

 

The detailing is.......................endless.  And most goes unseen! 

 

Randy

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Yep Randy, mos will be unseen, but I have the feeling I have to add them.

After the fuel line, I’m adding some A/C lines. For that, I had to temporary attach the front fender to the frame as well as the radiator, condenser and receiver/drier. I can continue the small line going from the other end of the receiver to the rear of the body; I will have to go next week in town to buy larger diameter rods for the A/C (I hate to go in town!).

The lines I’m doing are similar to the real ones; their shape can differ a bit because I have to do them to fit the model.

 

936 More lines.JPG

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As the weather was not too bad, I went in the town to buy some brass, rubber cords and Coltogum (a black rubber-like product to make the various belts). I could finish the A/C lines; I’m glad I did that before painting the frame: I had to drill holes to attach the lines (brake, fuel and A/C) and manipulate the frame a number of times to have the lines right; the body was also involved to check the clearance.

One brake line is still missing: the one at the rear axle. This is the next job; after that, I probably be ready to paint the rear suspension/axle.

After the picture was done, all lines got into a chemical bath; they are now covered with a thin coat of tin.

937 AC lines.JPG

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I did wonder how your were going to 'colour' the pipes. I did not consider using solder to turn them to a bright metal colour. Simple but effective. Well done, yet again for some logical thinking.

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On 1/21/2018 at 4:25 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Officially no. If you read the text from Barry Wolk under the ad, you will understand that Ford let rework two damaged cars as convertibles. Over the time, some body shops converted coupes into convertibles. In short: there were no production convertibles.

i understand that there was one factory built as a convertible for the personal use of henry ford ll.

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This vehicle should be in the Henry Ford Museum, or maybe Smithsonian when it's complete.  Has there ever been a better model made?  I doubt it.  

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