Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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After two days of milling, the bands for the tire pattern are ready; there are more than 1000 teeth milled one by one! I know, I'm mad. As you can see the vice of the machine is way too short. After about 40 mm (1.5") I have to release the band and reposition it. This method does not allow to have a very precise pitch, but who cares?

The bands are now ready to be soft solder to the blank.

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To mill the bands was annoying, very repetitive. To install them on the stock is not so repetitive, but annoying too! The first one is soft soldered around the perimeter of the tire; to get the tire hot enough to sold it takes about 8 minutes and no question to position the first band with the hands, its too hot...

Once the first is soldered, it's time for the second one. The whole has to cool down to adjust the next band at the proper length. At first I wanted to fix them on the tire with small pins; I abandoned the idea because while boring the band shifted. At the end, I positioned it with masking band and soldered at 10 places. One band needs about half hour to be soldered. Then, the whole has again to be cooled to clean the excess solder. Then the next one is installed...

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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Roger,

I’d gone out to the French site where you posted the rebuild of your Avanti model and went through all 28 pages. Your work, tedious detail to say the least, is nothing but just amazing. And as far any concern of it being in French and not being able to follow along, I believe that every picture spoke a thousand words in many languages. I also noted that the time period basically covered 4 years, now I can’t imagine why that would be, it must be that you were trying to put to much detail into it. Ok, now you’ve got to believe that I’m pulling your leg. The Avanti can only be a taste of what the Continental project holds in store. I for one am in for the long haul. Scott

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Roger,

I’d gone out to the French site where you posted the rebuild of your Avanti model and went through all 28 pages. Your work, tedious detail to say the least, is nothing but just amazing. And as far any concern of it being in French and not being able to follow along, I believe that every picture spoke a thousand words in many languages. I also noted that the time period basically covered 4 years, now I can’t imagine why that would be, it must be that you were trying to put to much detail into it. Ok, now you’ve got to believe that I’m pulling your leg. The Avanti can only be a taste of what the Continental project holds in store. I for one am in for the long haul. Scott

Thank you Scott!

In fact, I began in 2003 with the restoration/reconstruction of that model. The first work was the construction of a new the frame and suspension. I began later to post in the French forum; they had before a strange system to insert pictures I never understood.

It took so many years because I'm not all the time doing that; it may happens weeks without activities on the model. Summer time is a bad season for models: as you can see in my signature, I have 3 older Cadillacs which need work or maintenance. From time to time, I'm overhauling 1956 to 63 Hydramatic transmissions for other people; I like to do that too!

The fact that many people are looking what I'm doing is an incentive to go further in the details; I like to surprise people! Another factor for the time spent: my very basic equipment. With a sophisticated milling machine, the master tire would be done in one afternoon. then, everybody with a little flair could do the same. With my limited tool park, it's a little bit different...

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Roger,

I’d gone out to the French site where you posted the rebuild of your Avanti model and went through all 28 pages. Your work, tedious detail to say the least, is nothing but just amazing. And as far any concern of it being in French and not being able to follow along, I believe that every picture spoke a thousand words in many languages. I also noted that the time period basically covered 4 years, now I can’t imagine why that would be, it must be that you were trying to put to much detail into it. Ok, now you’ve got to believe that I’m pulling your leg. The Avanti can only be a taste of what the Continental project holds in store. I for one am in for the long haul. Scott

Can you, or someone post a link to that French site please?

If there is a link in this thread, I'm not seeing it.

:)

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Can you, or someone post a link to that French site please?

If there is a link in this thread, I'm not seeing it.

:)

Sorry about that, this should help: accForum :: Voir le sujet - Avanti au 1:12

I found it under unimogjohn's Avanti R2, 163, Refresh. Roger had posted there in response to a comment unimogjohn made after he had found it.

Enjoy... Scott

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Thank you Scott to respond to the question from Sweepspear!

By looking at the French forum you may have difficulties to understand unless you can read French. At first the vehicle is complete, then there is a new frame and a funny one, then again something which makes no sense. Here is shortly the reason: I began the model in 1963; it was ready in 1966 I believe. When I was put in early retirement, I had a look at that model and decided to refresh it a little bit. At the end, it was a reconstruction at 95 %. Therefore the first pictures in the French forum were posted somewhere during the reconstruction. It will be different with the Mark II model: pictures will be posted since the beginn.<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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Just an FYI for anyone that cant read French. Google Toolbar has a feature for Firefox and Internet Explorer that can translate the French to English and maybe some other languages.

Roger,

You sure kept people interested over there. Thirty pages of replies. How wonderful is that.

Edited by Packin31 (see edit history)

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Just an FYI for anyone that cant read French. If you use Firefox as your browser it has a feature where you can translate the French to English and maybe some other languages.

Roger,

You sure kept people interested over there. Thirty pages of replies. How wonderful is that.

Tom, I try my best! There is no secret to have so many pages: to post on a regular basis with something new. I will do it too.

About the translation done by a machine: I used to translate for GM or correct text translated by machine or people who are not specialized in technical matters: I had sometimes to request the original text in order to understand what I had to verify/correct!

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At least, all the bands are on the tire. After some finishing work, the master tire is ready. Ready? Not quite. Usually bias-ply tires have ribs on the side; I'm attempting to reproduce them. The first picture is showing the milling; the second one is showing how this is done on my small but versatile machine. After 120 indentations on one side, the other side is also to be done. It seems a lot of work but it's indeed quickly done.
Pictures 3 and 4 are showing the master tire from front and rear. The cavity in the front is the space for the white wall. You will see it in pictures; it's easier to understand with pictures than an approximate explanation.

And now is the master tire ready? No! Not yet: I have to write the brand and dimension. How? Quite simple: with paint.

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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Sorry about that, this should help: accForum :: Voir le sujet - Avanti au 1:12

I found it under unimogjohn's Avanti R2, 163, Refresh. Roger had posted there in response to a comment unimogjohn made after he had found it.

Enjoy... Scott

Thank you Scott!

Roger,

You are a gifted individual! I had no idea as to the level of intricate detail you put into these!

My late Father owned an Avanti at one time, so I have some first hand knowledge.

I am speechless as to how accurate even the smallest of details where faithfully reproduced.

Thank you for sharing. thumbsup.gif

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Hi Roger,

After following your work on this thread, I can really understand the term "runs like a Swiss watch" . Talented and beautiful workmanship, and something to be extremely proud of. Thanks for your posts, and keep them coming!

:) kaycee

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Gerald Wingrove wrote in his book that the tiny imperfections are reproduced with fidelity by the silicone rubber; he wrote also that the best way to add the manufacturer name and dimension is done with paint. I did that with success on my 2 first models; the technique will not be modified.

First, I sprayed some filler on a portion of the tire; once dry, I "wrote" the name and dimension on the paint as you can see on the first picture. Then, with a sharp piece of brass, I just scratch the unnecessary paint to form the letters. A magnifying glass is needed for that, of course. The letters are far from perfect; I have as a reference a sticker I got once in a plastic kit. If I screw up, it's possible to correct with paint and, when viewed at a distance, these imperfections are unnoticed.

The second picture is showing the contour of some letters; I do the easy ones first!

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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The lettering is over. There is enough paint on the characters to be seen on the real tire. One correction is still to be done: the "Y" is not quite the way it should. Minor corrections can also be done on the polyester moulds. I'm not yet that far!

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Yesterday, March 21, I prepared the master tire to make negative molds. It is obvious that I have to do 2 half negative molds otherwise I could not take the brass part out. The half molds have to be done one after the other. If the first one gets bad, mostly with bubbles, I will only discover it when the second half mold is done.

To avoid that, the silicone is going everywhere, the brass tire is pub in a bed of plastilin. To have a nice and regular separation line, I did a donut with Plexiglas. Then I mixed some silicone with its catalyst and poured it into the mold. The mixing is creating a lot of bubbles; this is the enemy nr. 1 in such work, therefore the mold went into a desiccator. The vacuum is created with a hand pump (will get some strong hand muscles!). After half an hour of pumping, most of the bubbles are gone and the silicone gets slowly set.
The day after, I could remove the plastiline and the Plexiglas donut. I had to improve the separation line as some silicone could get between the Plexiglas and brass. Then I will have to pour silicone to form the second half mold. Will that be good? The answer in some days.
 

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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What did you use to act as a divider between halves that wouldn't stick to both halves?

The divider is just used to have a clean and straight surface. After the first half mold is done, the divider is taken away without problem. This silicone does not stick to any product except on itself. This is the next critical step.

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After cleaning, the the half mold is pushed back into its initial position. It is now time to pour another batch of silicone to get the second half mold. However, before this can happens, a critical little job must be done: to spray some release agent on the separation line, otherwise, the silicone will stick to itself like mad!

This morning, I took the whole mold out of the tin can. Will that be good? after gently working on the silicone to separate it from his companion and from the brass tire, it's YES! the result is good, no bubbles, nothing except that the material wend under the bands forming the tread, as they were just spot soldered. It's not a big problem, this flash material can be teared away, taken care that the whole tread is not coming with.

In fact, I could to right now tires with the molds. There are location tabs on the separation surface, it would be possible. However, it's not advisable. If the silicone for the tires sticks to the mold and damages it, the whole process is to be done again. Therefore these molds are just an intermediate step.

The next step will be to pour the same material into the half molds.

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Recently, I promised to show pictures from the Avanti. I discovered that it's not so easy to photography a scale model. Here are some I did the last few days.

If you would like to see the Toronado, let me know!

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Roger, you are fooling us. That obviously is a real Avanti. Now show us the model!

I am in awe of your work. Truly impressive. What fantastic work. Thanks for sharing the pics. And yes, pls. do post pics of your Toronado.

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