trimacar

painting car parts with a brush

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A buddy and myself painted my first car, a 57 DeSoto, with a gallon of EJ Korvett ( a long closed Chicago discount store) black porch and deck enamel and 2 four inch brushes. No sanding, no primer, no taping off the chrome, just two guys being a little crazy. It look great from 20 feet away and even better up close if you really squinted your eyes. Have fun

Dave S 

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1 hour ago, maok said:

Search POR-15

 

In using POR-15 be sure to use the right product. Many of their rust encapsulation paints are UV sensitive and will easily fade or go milky when exposed to sunlight. I've used POR-15 undercar and on underbonnet(hood) parts and these have held up well for 9 years now. I believe they now have products that ARE UV resistant. That said the POR-15 comes up excellently, when brush applied, not super shiney but very shiny. And, as always, the finish is dependent on the preparation and cleanliness put in before any paint is applied

 

Link - https://www.por15.com/

 

Edited by Ozstatman (see edit history)
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Thanks all.  I see the POR-15 two part urethane top coat looks like it would do a nice job.  I wonder if brush painting it requires a forced-air respirator?  There are marine paints too that look like they would do the job.  Color palette is pretty limited though.  

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On December 3, 2017 at 4:44 PM, Willie Wurke said:

Does anyone on here remember that after WWII the craze was " PAINT YOUR CAR WITH A POWDER PUFF" ?

It was a very thin enamel. Most cars were 1930's vintage and pretty shabby so the product had good success!

Yes,I remember my father telling me he painted his '36 Plymouth with a powder puff. This was 1947, and I was too little to remember but he said it looked good.

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I quit spray painting cars back in 1992 and have used brush painting a number of times for touchup purposes. Purists have a cow but it comes down to what you have and the overall picture, the cars I did it to had either rough original or compromised repainted finishes. I used a brush and acrylic enamel on a 32 Cadillac with a failing 60s lacquer job. Definitely not perfect but much improved and corrosion proof.

32 cad - 7.jpg

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DSCF1668.JPG

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Tex you got a good color match on that Caddy fender. If you wet sand and buff it will look like new, you can do that with lacquer easy.

 

I used to work in an ambulance factory. They had fibreglass interior panels that always got gouged during installation. I would touch up the gouges just like you did that fender using matching gel coat. When it was dry I could carefully sand it down with 600 paper, blend and polish it , and you couldn't tell it was ever damaged.

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3 hours ago, TexRiv_63 said:

Purists have a cow

That alone makes brushing fun. I can't do it without smiling.

 

The ones I have seen get their shorts twisted most is the body shop guys. Yeah, they drive around in a nice car it took three tries to make right (they would charge a customer for all three times, too) and cross their legs and their eyes when someone mentions "brush". I have been around the job shop production painters enough to know. I only know one real high level painter and I am meeting him for coffee in a couple of hours. We have discussed brushing, no big deal.

 

The other thing I do that torques them is wipe a car I bought to flip down with kerosene, or any old oil, to make it shine.

 

It is all attitude. Back in the mid-'80's I was driving a '62 Electra 225 six window that I had cut the roof off and made into a pretty convincing convertible, under the story "After me it goes to the junkyard".

I had it at a local show and a friend of mine had just finished a faithful restoration of an AAR Baracuda He said "My stomach is in knots when I drive my car, scared it will be hit, I park in the farthest spots in a parking lot, I am a wreck whenever I get near it."  "And YOU drive around in THAT thing, having a good time and not a care about it. Something is really wrong here!"

 

Well, Jon, nuthin' changed.

Bernie

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In 1957 my brother bought a $95.00 green 1951 Olds 98 Convertible, he wanted it to be red.  We practiced for a few years on the trunk lid with a brush,, not getting a good finish.  Then, when we moved to Florida the house my dad bought had a Electrolux Vacuum Cleaner & spray attachment in the garage.

We painted the old car about twice a year with enamel house paint, and learn to enjoy the shiny stucco like finish. Never painted a car with a brush again after buying a Navy surplus compressor made by Crosley..We painted a lot of car, at the time we were happy with it, but not up to today's standards.

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Ok, I confess, the first car I ever purchased, a 1971 Buick for 25 bucks was twelve different colors, so I undertook my first paint job with rust oleum and a roller......yup. It looked good from 200 feet away. Ok maybe 250. True story. 

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On ‎12‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 9:09 AM, captndan said:

Many of the world’s finest yachts are painted with a brush.  It’s called roll and tip.  Kind of a status thing.  I you can afford it go for it.

 

Several years ago I painted the hull of my 20 ft. Shamrock motorboat using Awlgrip paint applied and "tipped" with a cigar sponge roller.  I made the bad decision of choosing the color of yellow, and found out that it "covered" very poorly.  After 7 coats, the yellow covered the white base very well, and there were no visible roller marks, even from a distance of just a few inches.  I was learning the process (with competent supervision),  while I applied the paint and wet-sanded my mistakes between coats.  After all of that, the final (7th) coat came out flawlessly.  I'm glad of two things:  1.  I had a very good teacher of the process;  2. I wasn't painting a 120 ft. yacht.

 

Here's a link to the Awlgrip site:   http://www.awlgrip.com/awlgrip-home.aspx

 

Cheers,

Grog

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