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36stude

1936 Studebaker Lock repair or rekeying

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I have a 1936 studebaker Trunk lock handle that I have no key for . Its siezed up . I had a locksmith look at it he soaked it for a while with no luck . I have a new NOS lock w key that can be installed Is there anyone out there that repairs these ?

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36Stude,

I should be able to help you out. I have some experience with various prewar stude locks and have a few locks on hand. But it sounds like you are all set on the lock itself. I just sent you a pm.

Montrose

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Attached is a photo of a 1931 Studebaker deck handle disassembled showing where all components were in position when assembled.

The important item is if you observe the handle body there is a small (.050) hole drilled in the body at precisely 21/32" from the cylinder surface. This is the way the retention expansion spring is released to remove the lock cylinder. These locks were considered theft proof and were intended to be thrown away and replaced with a new lock when defective.

At this age other problems are usually encountered, the aged Zinc diecast tumbler cylinder suffers from molecular self destruction that makes it expand and sieze itself with in the handle body. It is great fortune when you can extract the old cylinder in usable condition without it crumbling from fatigue.

Stude8

post-31139-143138019149_thumb.jpg

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You will have to drill it. Stick with Stude8 he knows what he's doing. I just followed his instructions and was able to remove the cylinder from my trunk which was locked. Just measure carefully and drill the hole. I initially was hesitant to drill it deep enough but eventually got the hole deep enough and the cylinder came out easily.

He sent me a drawing of the position where the handle is to be drilled. If he does not send it to you I still have it and can email it to you.

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That is one way to release the lock, but it would be best if it was first "free" in its bore (when it is free, it can be rotated slightly without the key). If you do have a new lock and the old lock is deemed not worth trying to save, the lock can also be bored out. In which case there would be no need in drilling the release hole.

Montrose

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36stude:

Email me at "studeracer_37@yahoo.com", I left you a PM on your AACA page but got no response, I have artwork to email you that will explain all the details you are questioning. It is too large to attach here and PM template does not allow .DOC file attachment.

Stude8

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