Terry Wiegand

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Terry Wiegand last won the day on May 21 2016

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About Terry Wiegand

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  1. Cloisonne' Repair?

    David, her name is Karla Maxwell. She is in Vista, California and her work is better than excellent. She has restored all three radiator emblems on our Buicks and they are simply beautiful. Her website is maxwellmetals I believe. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  2. 1916/1917 LIGHT SIX VALVE CAGE SEALING RINGS

    Rick, yes, the rings you have started out as the dimensions for the Light Six sealing rings. You have to keep in mind that yours have been squeezed, or compressed to fit the counterbore and top of the cage. Can you measure the outside diameter of the cages? This will tell the whole story for you. Your old rings are deformed and won't tell you a whole lot, but the cages will. Rick, could you post some photos of the removed cages? Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  3. 1924-41 models side window "level"?

    Well, Jim, since you have been into the body cavity beneath the closed window, what is the purpose of the arm or shoe that has the spring behind it? That surely doesn't come into contact with the glass. Like I said, I still haven't got this contraption all figured out yet. Terry Wiegand Out in HOT Doo Dah
  4. 1924-41 models side window "level"?

    Leif, here are a couple of photos of the rear window 'locks' that are like the ones in my 1922 Model 48. I picked these up on eBay several years for next to nothing because the seller did not know what they were or what they fit. I still haven't got them all figured out yet. On my car the strap comes up through the bottom window trim piece. I believe the strap runs between the glass and the shoe with the spring behind it. When the glass is all the way up the lock turns out and holds the bottom side of the glass channel? Like I have told several guys after I have shown them to them, I haven't got these things all figured out yet either. How about you - what is your thoughts about these parts? Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  5. I have a front axle from a 1916/1917 40 Series Buick. This is from a rolling chassis that I bought years ago and parted out. This needs to go - I need the room in my shop. I am going to put a price of 'Make Me A Reasonable Offer' on it. The new owner will take care of the crating and shipping. I also have two sets of intake and exhaust manifolds for the 40 Series Buick Light Six engine. The EARLY engines used an aluminum intake with the different shaped cast iron exhaust manifold. The later production engines used cast iron on both manifolds. Both sets are in nice shape with no broken ears or cracks that I can find. The new owner will take care of the crating and shipping. One more thing about the front axle - it is for the 56 inch tread cars. These parts really need to be gone from my shop. I am easy. If anyone thinks that they might be able to use these pieces, get with me. My phone and email works. The manifolds have the same 'Make Me A Reasonable Offer' price on them. Terry Wiegand Phone - (620) 665-7672 eMail - terrywiegand@prodigy.net
  6. I have the later production 1916 40 series intake and exhaust manifolds for the 6-cylinder engine. Both manifolds were cast iron on the later built engines. They need to be gone from my shop. Hopefully someone will want them and the asking price is 'Make Me A Reasonable Offer'. The new owner will take care of the crating and shipping. Terry Wiegand Phone - (620) 665-7672 eMail - terrywiegand@prodigy.net
  7. I have for sale the intake and exhaust manifolds for the early 40 series 6-cylinder engine. The intake was cast aluminum on the early production engines. I am going to put a price of 'Make Me A Reasonable Offer' on this pair of manifolds. I need the room in my shop and maybe some Buick Light Six owner with the early series engine might want them. The new owner will take care of the crating and shipping. Terry Wiegand Phone - (620) 665-7672 - land line and voice mail eMail - terrywiegand@prodigy.net
  8. I have this front axle that came from a 1916 Buick D-45 that I parted out. What is shown is all that was left when I bought the chassis parts. I am also going to post this in the Buick Buy/Sell section. I am going to put a price on this axle of 'Make Me A Reasonable Offer'. Maybe somebody out there can use it. I need the room in my shop. The new owner will take care of the crating/shipping. This needs to go folks. I'm easy and my phone and email works. Terry Wiegand Phone - (620) 665-7672 - land line with voice mail eMail - terrywiegand@prodigy.net
  9. 1937 Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

    Hey Ben, I just noticed something for the very first time when I opened Gary's thread up tonight. In the very first photo that he posted, the car does not have a visor on it. Would you have any suggestions for him about that? Terry Wiegand Out Doo Dah Way
  10. 1914 Buick B-37M Touring Sedan ignition info

    Howard, it would be a whole lot better to get your request for help into the Pre-War Buick section. There are guys on there from all over the world who can and will help you. Going by your original posting, you mentioned the model as a 1914 model 37M. The photos that you posted are from a much later 6-cylinder engine. A 30-series model in 1914 would be a 4-cylinder engine. I am trying to help you by getting you to the right area on the forums. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  11. "High" Nuts vs Standard for Cylinder Head

    So, at the end of the day, each thread pitch has it's good and bad points. I think it would be really unfair to say that one is better than the other. It all comes down to the individual application. The demount-able, split rims on my 1920 and 1922 Buicks are held onto the wheel rims with 7/16"-20 Heavy Hex machine nuts holding the rim wedges in place. This is a very good example of threads not loosening under vibration and wheels certainly are the subject of constant vibration. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  12. 1917 valve guide lubrication

    Brian, you are almost right about the rocker cover. That started with the 1919 models and the early production started in middle to late 1918. In regard to the rocker bushing lube, I have been running 80W90 Gear Oil in the galleys on my 1920 and 1922. That stuff seems to work pretty well and doesn't ooze and slobber too bad. Maybe I should run a thicker and heavier lube so things will stay put longer. Since it gets pretty warm under the cover, maybe the heavier lube will get to where it is supposed to be to do its job. Terry Wiegand Out Doo Dah Way
  13. "High" Nuts vs Standard for Cylinder Head

    This has been an interesting discussion for sure. Here is something to think about. Geoff mentions in his original post that the head nuts are 7/16-20 thread. The original engineers wanted fine thread for a reason - more thread surface to share the load. I have always felt that it is a very good idea to replace fasteners like this when things come apart for any reason. The reason being that the original threading has been 'stressed' or 'pulled' if you will to a small degree. I agree that replacing all of the cylinder head nuts might seem unnecessary, however, replacing the head gaskets twice seems like a really unnecessary situation. Also, the metallurgy of 100 years ago doesn't even begin to come close to what is available today. Just some things to think about. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  14. 1916/1917 LIGHT SIX VALVE CAGE SEALING RINGS

    Rick, be careful during the process of pulling the cages out of the block. They are gray cast iron and can and have been known to break. My advice to you during the puller procurement is to soak the cage pockets brim full with Marvel Mystery Oil. I am a huge fan of this stuff because it works. Let it set for a few days and it should make things easier to remove. The engine doesn't look too terribly bad in the photos, so we can hope that things will come apart without too much trouble. Take your time and take it slow and easy and you should be fine. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  15. Who is re-manufacturing Top Irons?

    David, thank you for the explanation. Now I understand what the fellow was talking about. Carl, I have seen several Buicks with this treatment on the top and I remember thinking at the time - what the heck is that supposed to be all about. OH WELL! Live and learn then die and forget it all. Thanks to both of you guys for enlightening us old fogeys. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas