oldcar

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  1. From time to time I mention my Lagonda Rapier on my thread under Our Cars and Restoration Projects/Packard Coupe but I thought that I really should start a thread dealing with Lagonda Rapiers here where they belong. For all those who are blinking and asking "What is a Lagonda Rapier" they are a small British car made for one year in 1934/5, until the Lagonda Company (absolutely nothing to do with Aston Martin until the late1940 when David Brown who had recently bought Aston Martin needed a decent 2 OHC engine and bought Lagonda)went into receivership. After the wash-up the Rapier continued in production, as Rapier Cars Ltd until 1938/9. Lagonda's original design brief to Timothy Ashcroft the engineer in charge of the small team given the task of creating the car was..Produce the best Light Car in the World. The result was a brilliant little sporting car with an 1100cc 2 ohc 4 cylinder engine and an ENV pre-selector transmission. Total combined production of both the Lagonda Rapier and the Rapier was less than 400 cars. To my knowledge there are about half a dozen of these cars in the US. One of the things that make these little cars so interesting (to look at) is that neither factory built a standard production body. EVERY car has an individual coach built body. No two are exactly the same. This is illustrated by the photograph taken yesterday of five of the cars situated in Melbourne Australia. Four are Lagondas and one a Rapier, they all have a body built by a different coachbuilder. Can you tell the difference? Bernie J. oldcar,
  2. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    For arm chair travel junkies:- go to your "search engine" and type in "Twist Creek Road Yackandandah, Victoria, Australia" 121.
  3. Good morning all, one or two of you will already know me. I have just purchased this early 1920s Stude but I am having trouble identifying what model it is. I apologise for the quality of the photograph but it was taken this morning on my wifes iPad under less than ideal conditions. The car is reputed to have been in dry storage since 1941. It is in Melbourne Australia. It is a very long time since I owned my last Stude, a Daytona Wagon. The photo shows the right hand side of the engine with the magneto and carburettor. This is unusual as the carburettor is attached to the (aluminium) cylinder head with the manifolding cast directly into the head. Can someone please identify the year and model. The Speedo shows 36,000 miles. The ignition/light switch has been broken so I will be looking for a replacement. Thank you oldcar (Bernie j)
  4. Lagonda Rapiers

    A Christmas Card for you. Good Morning and Compliments of the Season to All. What a mixed year this has been. On the domestic front all has been rather quiet with our family busily pursuing their own activities. Now I know that many of you are waiting impatiently for our Motoring News. 2017 started off badly with our beloved Lagonda Rapier tucked up in the garage with the engine out and all in pieces following the horror return journey home from the NSW, VSCC Dubbo Rally. The outcome of this was a total engine rebuild that seemed to go on and on. In the process I had decided that I needed to do something about the carburettion and more specifically, the inlet manifold. This developed into one of those situations where the more I did the worse the problem got. It was not until September that I got the Rapier running well enough for us to attend the VSCC’s “Wimmera Wander” a mid week touring event that took us along some completely new country roads. This started in Hamilton, one of the principle Western District towns and one that we have visited a number of times in the past. It is a day’s drive from our home in suburban Melbourne . The “Wander” started with “out and back” drives for the first two days then into the Grampians where we spent the final night at Halls Gap. Un-characteristically, the Rapier decided to hold us up not once but twice on the same day. Firstly a clevis pin fell out of the gear-change linkage, making it impossible to change gears. This I could rectify on the side of the road, using a nut and bolt out of the selection always carried in one of the pockets in the tool bag. Then later that afternoon the silencer and exhaust pipe decided to fall off! Perhaps due to some late night workmanship when re-assembling the car after its engine rebuild.This could be put back temporarily but required further work after we had returned home. On the return leg after the weeks motoring, I noticed that the engine was running too fast at an idle. As this did not improve with winding the adjustment fully back, I diagnosed this as an air leak somewhere in the induction side of things. First thing to be suspect was the ill fated modifications to the inlet manifolds. Taking these off the engine and placing them upside down of my work bench I could test them for air leaks using some methylated spirits. It showed that the site of my previous repair was porous permitting air to leak in. I was to eventually admit defeat and order a new pair of inlet manifolds from the Rapier Register “Spares” in England. While I was waiting for these to arrive by post. I could remove the exhaust system and weld the slip joint that had failed while away. When the new inlet manifolds finally arrived I could enlist our son Steve’s assistance in enlarging the ports both on the carburettor and the cylinder head sides. Finally It is all back together and running nicely but as this was not accomplished until mid November this has been our quietest year as far as our “Vintage” motoring is concerned. On the restoration front it has been an equally unproductive year although it has seen some changes with regard to the cars. Firstly uncharacteristically I decided that I was never going to finish the 1912 Humber, as a result it was advertised on the PrewarCar website. Thankfully it sold relatively quickly and I spent a couple of weeks packing up all the bits for it’s sea voyage to the land of its birth, England. It is an interesting aside, that since arriving in England It has changed owners twice. I decided rightly or wrongly that what I really wanted was a Vintage Light Car project, It did not take many weeks before I had a 1929 Triumph “Super Seven”. Sadly It only took a matter of two or three weeks for me to decide that perhaps the little Triumph was not all that super! It too very quickly found a new owner about as far away as possible without leaving the eastern side of Australia. Again I was gainfully employed packing it all up for the long road journey north to Cairns in Northen Queensland I barely had time to sweep out the garage when our enthusiastic son Steve telephoned to tell me that there was a car advertised on “Gum-tree”, he thought I should at least enquire about. After a short discussion I arranged go and look at a 1920 Studebaker,” Light Six”. Following short discussion we decided to buy it. Since having it safely at home I have been able to start a “thread” on the Studebaker section of the Antique Automobile Club of America’s internet Forum. In the past I have made a habit of using the AACA’s Forum to uncover all sorts of information regarding my various project cars! I now know that our “Stude” is probably the earliest surviving “Light Six” and also a rather special car. One of just a handful of surviving examples of its model but in addition to being right hand drive, it is fitted with the optional Wire Spoke wheels and Magneto Ignition. It shows all the signs of less than careful storage, It appears to have spent most of it’s life since December 1941, while undercover, stored in various farm sheds and “Chook” houses. Firstly in Springvale from 1941 to 1969 or perhaps 1970. Then it \was sold to a man who ran a mixed farm/orchard at Merrigum, not far from Shepparton. Once there it was placed into another shed and left almost untouched until when it was sold at a Farm Clearance Auction in 2012. From Merrigum it was transported to Collingwood but while on the way, the Hood was removed and left in another farm shed at Gooram, not far from Echuca. The new owner parked the Studebaker in the vast garage. he did not even bother to jack the car up and put in “on blocks”. It stayed there, standing on flat tyres, until we bought it another five years later. Now, I have had all the wheels sand blasted, painted and fitted with four new tyres. I can now move the car single handed. While the motor was “stuck” and impossible to move using the crank handle. Now after gently “rocking” the car with top gear engaged, the motor turns over nicely. Perhaps for the first time in a great many years. The most surprising thing is the speedo reading, just 36,016 miles. Being a 1920 Light Six, one of the first two years production,it has an experimental engine fitted with an aluminium cylinder head. This motor was only used for a little over two years. One of the problems with this motor is that enthusiastic mechanics tended to over tighten the spark-plugs, in the process stripping the thread in the cylinder head. The upholstery will need to be replaced. The seats have provided a safe and comfortable home for generations of rats & mice! Also some of the paint work will require some judicious “patching in”, to go any further would risk spoiling the wonderful “oily rag” patina of the car. We had one more delightful sojourn, this time in Helen’s trusty VW Jetta, we set out to drive to Canberra to meet up with son Nicholas and his family, who live in Adelaide, for an enjoyable few days. But as is our custom we avoided the Hume Highway driving instead up the Melba Highway towards Yea and Mansfield. From there we followed the road past Powers Lookout, through Beechworth to Wodonga where we stopped for the night. Next day we set off again taking the Olympic Highway through Junee and Cootamundra before turning off on to some “interesting side roads to make our next stop at Binalong where VSCC member Stuart Saunders has the Motor Museum. From there it was an easy drive through Yass to Canberra. In Canberra we stayed at the Rex Hotel/Motel for four nights. Nic had hired a seven seater People mover and given Canberra’s convoluted road system, we were happy for him to drive us each day. It was great for us to have so much time with Nic, Susannah, and their two, Julius and Helena. Leaving Canberra we chose to ignore the Highways again, instead we took the road through Wee Jasper, Tumut and Batlow where some of the best Apples in Australia are grown, our destination for that day’s driving wasTumbarumba. Rapier owner Neil Hamilton has recently bought a property about ten Kms south of the town, until they finish building their new house they are living in a rented house a little closer to the town. We had a very pleasant evening with Neil and Grazysna. Next morning we set off again travelling South-West. Again we chose to find our way through the lesser travelled roads including Twist Creek Road that runs through some interesting country between Yackandandah and Beechworth. A fabulous drive but not if you are in a hurry and not if you are worried about getting your car dirty. Oh yes! There are a couple of first and second gear bits too. One thing for sure, the traffic will not be of concern! We enjoyed every km. but we would not attempt to drive it in Mid Winter or High Summer. From there we drove along the King Valley Road to Mansfield and finally back down the Maroondah Highway to home. My first year of being an Octogenarian was relatively uneventful and Helen still has another year before she joins me in the OBE Club. We both feel remarkably well and still look forward to the future rather than back at the past. Hopefully 2018 will bring some/a lot more enjoyable adventures for us. Some in the Lagonda Rapier and perhaps in the Studebaker too. For now it will be another New Year of French and Strength Training for Helen and my Monday morning games of Petanque. All that remains is to wish you and your families an Extremely Happy Christmas and an Even Better and Healthy New Year. Happy motoring in 2018. Bernie j.
  5. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    A Christmas card for you. Good Morning and Compliments of the Season to All. What a mixed year this has been. On the domestic front all has been rather quiet with our family busily pursuing their own activities. Now I know that many of you are waiting impatiently for our Motoring News. 2017 started off badly with our beloved Lagonda Rapier tucked up in the garage with the engine out and all in pieces following the horror return journey home from the NSW, VSCC Dubbo Rally. The outcome of this was a total engine rebuild that seemed to go on and on. In the process I had decided that I needed to do something about the carburettion and more specifically, the inlet manifold. This developed into one of those situations where the more I did the worse the problem got. It was not until September that I got the Rapier running well enough for us to attend the VSCC’s “Wimmera Wander” a mid week touring event that took us along some completely new country roads. This started in Hamilton, one of the principle Western District towns and one that we have visited a number of times in the past. It is a day’s drive from our home in suburban Melbourne . The “Wander” started with “out and back” drives for the first two days then into the Grampians where we spent the final night at Halls Gap. Un-characteristically, the Rapier decided to hold us up not once but twice on the same day. Firstly a clevis pin fell out of the gear-change linkage, making it impossible to change gears. This I could rectify on the side of the road, using a nut and bolt out of the selection always carried in one of the pockets in the tool bag. Then later that afternoon the silencer and exhaust pipe decided to fall off! Perhaps due to some late night workmanship when re-assembling the car after its engine rebuild.This could be put back temporarily but required further work after we had returned home. On the return leg after the weeks motoring, I noticed that the engine was running too fast at an idle. As this did not improve with winding the adjustment fully back, I diagnosed this as an air leak somewhere in the induction side of things. First thing to be suspect was the ill fated modifications to the inlet manifolds. Taking these off the engine and placing them upside down of my work bench I could test them for air leaks using some methylated spirits. It showed that the site of my previous repair was porous permitting air to leak in. I was to eventually admit defeat and order a new pair of inlet manifolds from the Rapier Register “Spares” in England. While I was waiting for these to arrive by post. I could remove the exhaust system and weld the slip joint that had failed while away. When the new inlet manifolds finally arrived I could enlist our son Steve’s assistance in enlarging the ports both on the carburettor and the cylinder head sides. Finally It is all back together and running nicely but as this was not accomplished until mid November this has been our quietest year as far as our “Vintage” motoring is concerned. On the restoration front it has been an equally unproductive year although it has seen some changes with regard to the cars. Firstly uncharacteristically I decided that I was never going to finish the 1912 Humber, as a result it was advertised on the PrewarCar website. Thankfully it sold relatively quickly and I spent a couple of weeks packing up all the bits for it’s sea voyage to the land of its birth, England. It is an interesting aside, that since arriving in England It has changed owners twice. I decided rightly or wrongly that what I really wanted was a Vintage Light Car project, It did not take many weeks before I had a 1929 Triumph “Super Seven”. Sadly It only took a matter of two or three weeks for me to decide that perhaps the little Triumph was not all that super! It too very quickly found a new owner about as far away as possible without leaving the eastern side of Australia. Again I was gainfully employed packing it all up for the long road journey north to Cairns in Northen Queensland I barely had time to sweep out the garage when our enthusiastic son Steve telephoned to tell me that there was a car advertised on “Gum-tree”, he thought I should at least enquire about. After a short discussion I arranged go and look at a 1920 Studebaker,” Light Six”. Following short discussion we decided to buy it. Since having it safely at home I have been able to start a “thread” on the Studebaker section of the Antique Automobile Club of America’s internet Forum. In the past I have made a habit of using the AACA’s Forum to uncover all sorts of information regarding my various project cars! I now know that our “Stude” is probably the earliest surviving “Light Six” and also a rather special car. One of just a handful of surviving examples of its model but in addition to being right hand drive, it is fitted with the optional Wire Spoke wheels and Magneto Ignition. It shows all the signs of less than careful storage, It appears to have spent most of it’s life since December 1941, while undercover, stored in various farm sheds and “Chook” houses. Firstly in Springvale from 1941 to 1969 or perhaps 1970. Then it \was sold to a man who ran a mixed farm/orchard at Merrigum, not far from Shepparton. Once there it was placed into another shed and left almost untouched until when it was sold at a Farm Clearance Auction in 2012. From Merrigum it was transported to Collingwood but while on the way, the Hood was removed and left in another farm shed at Gooram, not far from Echuca. The new owner parked the Studebaker in the vast garage. he did not even bother to jack the car up and put in “on blocks”. It stayed there, standing on flat tyres, until we bought it another five years later. Now, I have had all the wheels sand blasted, painted and fitted with four new tyres. I can now move the car single handed. While the motor was “stuck” and impossible to move using the crank handle. Now after gently “rocking” the car with top gear engaged, the motor turns over nicely. Perhaps for the first time in a great many years. The most surprising thing is the speedo reading, just 36,016 miles. Being a 1920 Light Six, one of the first two years production,it has an experimental engine fitted with an aluminium cylinder head. This motor was only used for a little over two years. One of the problems with this motor is that enthusiastic mechanics tended to over tighten the spark-plugs, in the process stripping the thread in the cylinder head. The upholstery will need to be replaced. The seats have provided a safe and comfortable home for generations of rats & mice! Also some of the paint work will require some judicious “patching in”, to go any further would risk spoiling the wonderful “oily rag” patina of the car. We had one more delightful sojourn, this time in Helen’s trusty VW Jetta, we set out to drive to Canberra to meet up with son Nicholas and his family, who live in Adelaide, for an enjoyable few days. But as is our custom we avoided the Hume Highway driving instead up the Melba Highway towards Yea and Mansfield. From there we followed the road past Powers Lookout, through Beechworth to Wodonga where we stopped for the night. Next day we set off again taking the Olympic Highway through Junee and Cootamundra before turning off on to some “interesting side roads to make our next stop at Binalong where VSCC member Stuart Saunders has the Motor Museum. From there it was an easy drive through Yass to Canberra. In Canberra we stayed at the Rex Hotel/Motel for four nights. Nic had hired a seven seater People mover and given Canberra’s convoluted road system, we were happy for him to drive us each day. It was great for us to have so much time with Nic, Susannah, and their two, Julius and Helena. Leaving Canberra we chose to ignore the Highways again, instead we took the road through Wee Jasper, Tumut and Batlow where some of the best Apples in Australia are grown, our destination for that day’s driving wasTumbarumba. Rapier owner Neil Hamilton has recently bought a property about ten Kms south of the town, until they finish building their new house they are living in a rented house a little closer to the town. We had a very pleasant evening with Neil and Grazysna. Next morning we set off again travelling South-West. Again we chose to find our way through the lesser travelled roads including Twist Creek Road that runs through some interesting country between Yackandandah and Beechworth. A fabulous drive but not if you are in a hurry and not if you are worried about getting your car dirty. Oh yes! There are a couple of first and second gear bits too. One thing for sure, the traffic will not be of concern! We enjoyed every km. but we would not attempt to drive it in Mid Winter or High Summer. From there we drove along the King Valley Road to Mansfield and finally back down the Maroondah Highway to home. My first year of being an Octogenarian was relatively uneventful and Helen still has another year before she joins me in the OBE Club. We both feel remarkably well and still look forward to the future rather than back at the past. Hopefully 2018 will bring some/a lot more enjoyable adventures for us. Some in the Lagonda Rapier and perhaps in the Studebaker too. For now it will be another New Year of French and Strength Training for Helen and my Monday morning games of Petanque. All that remains is to wish you and your families an Extremely Happy Christmas and an Even Better and Healthy New Year. Happy motoring in 2018. Bernie j.
  6. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    The "soft" door pocket flaps certainly should make life easier. All I need to do is to "borrow"my wife's sewing machine. Further to the above, while I am new to Studebakers, I do have some sixty five years of experience of repairing, rebuilding, restoring, researching and driving :- Pre 1940 Motor cars. Bernie j.
  7. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Possibly out of place here, these are before and after photographs of the Packard.
  8. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Thank you both. These photographs show me exactly what I needed to know. While obviously original whay I had trouble understanding was the length of the "Flaps" over the door pockets even in the earlier car, similar to my 1920) to lift the flaps over the front door pockets requires the door to be opened first. This seems to be more pronounced in the later cars with even longer flaps. The photographs also confirm that the pocket is off centre to accomodate the door handle. The centre cross rail in the frame of my doors would governs the depth of the pocket. As with the rest of the car the original timber in the door frames is in excellent condition. It is just a pity the the rats living in the car during its long stay in a "hen-house" took such a liking to the original interior trim in the car. The other thing I was unsure about was it there was a section of carpet at the bottom of the doors as on the rear of the front seat. The final photograph shows the interior trim details of the 1922 Packard Single Six I restored some years ago with the carpet extended across the bottoms of the door and the door pocket detail. Prior to my ownership the Packard had spent a number of years in a storage shed on the Melbourne docks subject of a dispute with the Australian Customs Service. Bernie j.
  9. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Getting information from Australian Government Department archives is a little like finding photographs of the interior trim in a 1920 Light Six tourer. The "Care & Operation Hand-book shows what the door trim looks like. So I guess that gives me a starting point. Bj.
  10. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Further to the above:- Please do not hold your breath. Christmas is coming.............
  11. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Bureaucracy at its best? One could very well ask “Why Bother?" Begin forwarded message: From: FOIstaff@roads.vic.gov.au Subject: Re: Information relating to a 1920 Studebaker car last registered in 1941 - Freedom of Information Request 2018.0542 Date: 8 December 2017 at 11:36:31 AM AEDT To: Bernie Jacobson <twooldlags@gmail.com> Dear Mr Jacobson, Please find attached acknowledgement letter in relation to your request. Freedom Of Information and Information Privacy Unit Legal Services VicRoads 60 Denmark Street KEW E foistaff@roads.vic.gov.au W vicroads.vic.gov.au Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Online Services | VicTraffic | LinkedIn From: Bernie Jacobson <twooldlags@gmail.com> To: foistaff@roads.vic.gov.au Date: 04/12/2017 11:20 AM Subject: Re: Information relating to a 1920 Studebaker car last registered in 1941 Ext: Business Area: Fax: Internet: File Name: File Description: This email is from an external source. If it is a Business Record remember to file it in QuickDocs Good Morning Can you please charge the $28.40 to my Visa or alternatively please send me your bank details and I will transfer this amount directly to your account. However before sending you my payment details can you assure me that you actually have some previously unavailable information for me. I have been taught to be cautious in these matters. Having twice paid the AOMC $110 only to be told that they could tell me nothing. If you care to discuss this personally my telephone number is 9842 5808, Bernard Jacobson. On 4 Dec 2017, at 9:40 AM, foistaff@roads.vic.gov.au wrote: Dear Mr Jacobson, I refer to your email below and advise that to provide access to this documentation a cheque of $28.40 as payment for the request is required. Please send the cheque made out to VicRoads, to Freedom of Information, 60 Denmark Street Kew Vic 3101. Regards, Freedom Of Information and Information Privacy Unit Legal Services VicRoads 60 Denmark Street KEW E foistaff@roads.vic.gov.au W vicroads.vic.gov.au Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Online Services | VicTraffic | LinkedIn From: Bernie Jacobson <twooldlags@gmail.com> To: foistaff@roads.vic.gov.au Date: 29/11/2017 04:25 PM Subject: Information relating to a 1920 Studebaker car last registered in 1941 Ext: Business Area: Fax: Internet: File Name: File Description: This email is from an external source. If it is a Business Record remember to file it in QuickDocs Good Afternoon I am seeking some information regarding the history of a 1920 Studebaker car. The car has been in storage since the last registration expired in December 1941. I understand it was originally registered in Victoria number 74593. It was subsequently re registered Victorian number 103981. I am seeking to discover the original registered owner and where and when it was first registered. The names and addresses of any subsequent owners up to & including the last registered owner. Having been in storage /off the road for so long this car is of special historical interest and this information is sought in order to piece together the cars early history. The people at the Association of Motoring Clubs who hold some of the early records suggested that they were prevented (FoI) from giving me any of this information and that I should contact your department. I am willing to pay any necessary search fee required if you are able to supply this additional information. I am a Hon Life Member of the Vintage Sports Car Club & a Internationally recognised motoring writer and historian. Thanking you Bernard (Bernie) Jacobson <twooldlags@gmail.com> (03) 9842 5808. <Mail Attachment.jpeg> <Mail Attachment.jpeg> Part of Transport for Victoria DISCLAIMER The following conditions apply to this communication and any attachments: VicRoads reserves all of its copyright; the information is intended for the addressees only and may be confidential and/or privileged - it must not be passed on by any other recipients; any expressed opinions are those of the sender and not necessarily VicRoads; VicRoads accepts no liability for any consequences arising from the recipient's use of this means of communication and/or the information contained in and/or attached to this communication. If this communication has been received in error, please contact the person who sent this communication and delete all copies. VicRoads Part of Transport for Victoria DISCLAIMER The following conditions apply to this communication and any attachments: VicRoads reserves all of its copyright; the information is intended for the addressees only and may be confidential and/or privileged - it must not be passed on by any other recipients; any expressed opinions are those of the sender and not necessarily VicRoads; VicRoads accepts no liability for any consequences arising from the recipient's use of this means of communication and/or the information contained in and/or attached to this communication. If this communication has been received in error, please contact the person who sent this communication and delete all copies. 2018.0542a.pdf
  12. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    I am currently looking at replacing the non-existent door trim panels in my 1920 Light Six. This is believed to be a very early car so I would be interested to see precisely how these were made and fitted. I have made one set but I am not happy that these would be excatly as original. I would also like to see how the trim was applied to the rear of the front seat. I imagine that it was the same carpet as used on the rear floor. Was there any carpet used on the front floor or was this entirely linoleum? Bj.
  13. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Hello Keninman Despite a "wet weekend" I am very happy that we live in Australia, even in the South-East corner which on our side of the Equator puts us nearest the "South-Pole" I cannot remember (in 80 years) when we last had Snow in Melbourne, our State Capital City and in Summer it is only rarely that the temperature climbs over 40 degrees Celsius. We built our home almost 50 years ago so we do not have air-conditioning but we do have heating that we run through Winter. We don't need a heated garage and I don't need Anti-freeze in any of our car's radiators. We don't need chains on the cars tires or special wheels with Snow & Mud tread tires. I do own an "overcoat" but again, I cannot remember when I last wore it. I bought it about 60 years ago when the cars I drove did not have heaters. I can drive the Lagonda with the top down 12 months of the year and enjoy it. We can drink excellent wine produced from vines growing in the Yarra Valley less that 20 miles from my front door. Normally our Policemen & women do not carry guns. If I need/want to go to the "City" we have a regular bus service every ten minutes. But rarely need to use it, we have a huge shopping "mall" just a couple of miles away with every kind of shop or service I am likely to need. We have an excellent Public Hospital (Free) about ten minutes drive away and the Doctor I see very occasionally is also part of the (free) Public Health Service. Despite my apparent "old age" I do all the work, not requiring special equipment, on the Lagonda and the Studebaker myself. I am sufficiently old-fashioned as to prefer and enjoy Oxy-Acetylene Welding. I have three comprehensive tool kits (Spanners etc) Metric, BSF/Whitworth and SAE/Unified which covers just about everything I am likely to need. I am happily married for over 50 years and have four children (three sons and a daughter) and nine grandchildren. All this being so, you could say that if a wet weekend is all I have to worry about, life is rather good. Oh yes! Following some fairly serious surgery 12 years ago I have been pronounced completely free of Cancer and my Heart seems to work fine unaided. We won't talk about my brain! No! we do not have a Swinning Pool in our garden but we do have a "fish pond". Bernie j.
  14. Lagonda Rapiers

    Hi Paul You are certainly not alone. I was absolutely amazed to actually see one in Hobart, Tasmania of all places. Hobart is the capital city of Tasmania, an Island below the south east corner of mainland Australia. It has a population of 225,000 people. That one of the that population is driving one of the worlds most expensive motor cars is quite remarkable to say the very least. If you miss Hobart the next stop is the South Pole. Bj
  15. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Back to the Studebaker (almost) It seems that work on the Light Six must take a weather related break for a day or two. It really is crazy, as many of you know I work on the car in an open carport. Officially December 1st, is the first day of Summer in Australia. Our weather forecasters are yesterday and today issuing warnings of extreme rain and storms, with more than a months rain expected to fall during the next day or two accompanied by wide-spread flooding in low lying areas. Bernie j
  16. Lagonda Rapiers

    For anyone in doubt about the 2017 Lagonda here is a photograph but don't expect to see too many parked outside your local Super-market. It is difficult to obtain an accurate Price quotation but I understand that to buy one you will need to raid your piggy bank to the tune of about one million dollars. Having said that, I have actually seen one on the Road, of all places in Australia's island state of Tasmania. No! Unfortunately I did not get a chance to talk to the owner. I believe that if you are lucky you make catch a glimpse of it around the Museum of Modern Art on the outskirts of Hobart that states Capital city. Bj.
  17. Lagonda Rapiers

    You are very welcome Wolfgang. While I am a committee member of the Register I am actually an Australian living in Australia. I have owned several Lagondas over what seems like a great number of years. When you have time you may enjoy looking at some of my other "threads" on this forum. Look under "oldcar". Hi Paul When you consider the production numbers it is no wonder that Lagonda were 'struggling' in the 1930s, even today without Aston Martin they could have disappeared years ago. Thinking about that, it could well be the other way around. Today, even if by name alone, Lagonda would have to be one of the oldest if not the oldest surviving car "Name" 1899 to 2017 is also remarkable. Bernie J.
  18. Lagonda Rapiers

    You do not have to take my word here is a contemporary road test for a 1937 Supercharged Rapier.
  19. Lagonda Rapiers

    For the benefit of those who may have never seen inside a Lagonda Rapier engine. There are three tensioners one for each chain. Wolfgang's is an extremely rare Factory Supercharged car, It used three "sprocket tensioners" where a spring loaded sprocket was fitted in lieu of the "blade tensioners" shown in the drawing. Factory Supercharged engines have been known to rev to over 7,000 rpm. Bj. .
  20. Lagonda Rapiers

    Just a little more information. The Rapier Register has on average between 150 and 160 members world wide. Between them they own around 200 cars. In total around the world the Register can identify 381cars produced, of these approximately 320 are known to still exist. These figures are little short of amazing considering that we are talking about a small 1100cc four cylinder car with a high performance twin overhead cam engine. The entire car was/is hand built to exacting standards. In 1934 (83 years ago) they staggered Motoring Journalists not only with their overall performance but with their ability to STOP. They were among the first cars to be fitted with the then new powerful (roller expander) Girling mechanical brakes. The Lagonda Rapier was recognised as the first production car to stop in less than 30 feet from 30 miles per hour. Even today a well maintained Rapier can be and frequently are driven safely among modern traffic. I personally have driven our 1934 Rapier through Central London and around the Paris Ring Road through modern Friday Afternoon traffic. For much of the clubs "regalia" a combination of the two badges is used. (See Above) Bj.
  21. Lagonda Rapiers

    Hello Wolfgang Welcome to our Rapier Forum. Your's as you probably know is a very famous Racing Car For the benefit of some others, The Phoenix name for your car comes from the fact that it raced in 1937 Phoenix Park(Ireland)100 Mile Race. It is understood that this car was the very last car assembled by the Rapier Car Company. I will take the liberty of scaning the relevant pages of EVER KEEN that tell something of the car's history. Regarding your "Chain Tensioners" Your engine does indeed have "chain tensioners. These are known as "Sprocket Tensioners" and were mainly fitted by the Rapier Car Company to the factory supercharged cars. They were an attempt to improve on the more usual "Weller Spring Blade Tensioners" which were fitted as standard to all the "Lagonda" Rapiers. This probably sounds a little confusing but for the First year of Production July 1934 to July 1935 Rapiers were built in the Lagonda factory. The Lagonda Company went into receivership in late July 1935. There was a deal struck with two or three of the Lagonda Companies now redundant employees togthers with a financial backer to take over the remaining unassembled parts in order to continuing producing cars. These cars were to have all reference to Lagonda removed, a new Radiator badge was designed and the Lagonda name was ground off the cam covers and the top of the chassis i.d. plate had the Lagonda Name and address cut off. Production continued until the end of 1937. Most Rapier Car Co cars were fitted with Ranalah bodies although as previously the purchaser of a new chassis could then take it to the coachbuilder of their Choice. In total there were just short of Four Hundred cars both Lagonda Rapiers and Rapiers produced between 1934 and 1937. "Ever Keen" is a book that I put together as part of the Rapier Registers 2009 celebration of the Rapiers 75th Anniversary. This book is a Numbered Limited Edition with over 200 pages of information about Rapiers and their owners around the world. There is a very limited number of new copies available from The Rapier Register Secretary/Treasurer, Martin Montfort email <rapierregister@gmail.com> . Ever Keen was the Rapier Car Co's Sales Slogan. It referrs to the sharpness of a Rapier in the hands of an expert (swordsman).
  22. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Hello Keninman I must confess that I have not encountered any of Sinclair Lewis. I have been reading and collecting PG Wodehouse books for a very long time, longer than I care to think about. I find that I can re-read his books a number of times and get something new from the experience every time. Most people tend to think only in terms of his Bertie Wooster stories which have been the subject of several TV series. But the Wooster & Jeeves adventures or perhaps more correctly "Mis-adventures" are but a tiny part of his out-put. Generally I like to read when I first go to bed, before turning out the light for perhaps up to an hour. It helps to take my mind off the day's activities. Normally I will read almost anything that has printed pages. I have been collecting and reading PGW for 60 years or more. It is only recently that I have decided to re-read my way through my collection. Anyone who has made a study of his work will understand and appreciate how his stories tie in with the type of car that I am interested in. Despite the amonut of time he spent in the USA and how many of his books are based on life in America during the 1920's and 30's, it seems that he is not widely read by Americans. Having re-read that and having meet quite a number of Americans I can see that some of his (PGW's) humour could be lost on them. Bj.
  23. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    Now for something different, from time to time I mention P.G.Wodehouse and the many books he had written during his lifetime. While essentially "English" he actually spent quite an amount of time living in America and many of his books referred to life in the USA. I have one bookcase devoted to his books. I decided a little while ago to start re-reading them. Not following any particular order but jut picking one off the shelf for my bedside reading. I have just finished "The Adventures of Sally" written in 1922 it covers a section of her life when she is mainly living in New York and gives us quite a good insite to life there in the early 1920s. The next book again chosen at random is "the Inimitable Jeeves this one was first printed in 1923. My copy is a "Fifth Printing" which probably makes it around 1924/5. Most of my copies are hard cover printed by "Herbert Jenkins" making them mainly Pre WW2 and mostly from the 1920s. As I am sure I have said many times already, "You do not have to be mad but it helps" Apart from anything else they do tell us something of the lives of the people who drove our cars when new. The observant among us will have noted that I do have several paperbacks on the bottom shelf. I am always interested in hearing from anyone with early (1920s) Herbert Jenkins copies of PGW's books in good condition. There are still almost as many of his stories that I do not have. I can always buy taller bookshelves. Yes! I have also posted the same thing on my Lagonda Rapier thread. Bernie j.
  24. Lagonda Rapiers

    Now for something different, from time to time I mention P.G.Wodehouse and the many books he had written during his lifetime. While essentially "English" he actually spent quite an amount of time living in America and many of his books referred to life in the USA. I have one bookcase devoted to his books. I decided a little while ago to start re-reading them. Not following any particular order but jut picking one off the shelf for my bedside reading. I have just finished "The Adventures of Sally" written in 1922 it covers a section of her life when she is mainly living in New York and gives us quite a good insite to life there in the early 1920s. The next book again chosen at random is "the Inimitable Jeeves this one was first printed in 1923. My copy is a "Fifth Printing" which probably makes it around 1924/5. Most of my copies are hard cover printed by "Herbert Jenkins" making them mainly Pre WW2 and mostly from the 1920s. As I am sure I have said many times already, "You do not have to be mad but it helps" Apart from anything else they do tell us something of the lives of the people who drove our cars when new. The observant among us will have noted that I do have several paperbacks on the bottom shelf. I am always interested in hearing from anyone with Herbert Jenkins copies of PGW's books in good condition. There are still almost as many of his stories that I do not have. I can always buy taller bookshelves. Bernie j.
  25. Early 1920s Studebaker ?

    I have to be up bright and early tomorrow morning, I have a 9.00am appointment at the local Charity Shop's warehouse to look at their range of Antique "Mahogany" timber Bed-heads and Tables. Now all you clever people why would I want such a thing? I hope to have some photographs to show you later tomorrow. Bernie j. 746