Willy

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About Willy

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 12/10/1941

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Marion, Montana
  • Interests:
    Antique cars, autoharps, inventing, harmonica collection, playing music, RV'ing.

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  1. TexRiv_63, I think you hold the secret to having an old car - I also have a separate savings account for things outside of our living expenses, so when I come across a bargain, it doesn't put us in a bind. I also keep ready cash at hand when I come across those once - in - a - lifetime deals. Example: I watched a 1924 DB Touring setting in a field for years. I asked if it was for sale, they said no. Years passed, and I went and asked again - the wife said her husband just died three months ago, and left her in financial ruin - said the car was for sale. I told her to talk to friends relatives, look online to get an idea of what she would be comfortable with, gave her my card. She called a week later. While looking again at the car she mentioned she had ANOTHER car in the barn - I asked her if she would sell both - she said yes. I bought both cars (one unseen in barn) on the spot. She was happy. I was happy. Then, she told me her father in law had most of the parts to the '24 at his truck shop, and she had most of the parts to the 1918 DB Touring (in the barn) in another barn. I got all that for $1000. Having the cash in my pocket for deals like that makes more sense than writing a check, or making payments - with cash, you can lower the price considerably, if you can produce the money right then. Since I have become financially strapped (thanks to the ACA - not the AACA), I am having to restore the 1918 myself. I sold the '24 with a '25 I bought ($1500) a year later, with a trailerload of great parts - sold both cars and all the parts I didn't need - for $1500. I downsized, made my wife happy, cleared my garage, and now have room to work on the 1918! I have a 20 year old (adopted) nephew who will get the car when I pass, along with my tools, books and whatever else he wants. At 76, I doubt I will be able to get to my 1928 Whippet Coach ( have a storage building stuffed with Whippet parts), so I don't know what'll happen to that.
  2. Hudson Museum Closing Controversy

    There is a small auto museum in Montana, privately owned. I have lived here twenty four years, and it is never open! I can look in the window and see the cars, but have never been able to go in. Wonder if that's the way the owner wants! Last year, Travelling from Iowa to Montana, we stopped at a large auto museum - can't think of the name, but it had large billboards advertising it for miles. Many of the cars were barely cleaned, in poor repair, some, I think on dirt floors, and some outside. Some just rotting away. As I remember, you could "adopt" one of the cars, and send money to have that car repaired, restored or maintained. And some were sold. Is it only me who wishes I could win a big lottery? But I guess, I'd have to play the lottery to win it!
  3. 1928 Whippet project w/extra parts

    More than enough parts to make one engine, but I will only sell the entire collection, not part it out.
  4. Early DB Top help

    Was there only one type rear window for a 1918 Touring? I have the rectangle window, but it looks like I need to figure on cathedral. I noticed several different style cathedral windows, different in numbers of windows. If I must have cathedral windows, Trimacar, how could I go about getting the dimensions from you? That would also mean I have a rectangular window for someone else.
  5. Early DB Top help

    Those windows look like soft plastic - I can't imagine that was what they had.
  6. Early DB Top help

    Can someone tell me what kind of back window I need for my 1918 DB Touring? I've seen it both ways. I have one back rectangle window. Willy
  7. I have many questions about sending to have new spoked wheels made. What do I do with the steel rims that fit the wood rims? Don't they heat, then fit them? If so, I can't paint them. I would guess, just sand, clean them. That would mean the inside of the steel would just be bare metal. Will the hubs be removable, once I get the wheels back? What do I use for bolts, as mine are shot? Half one front wheel, half one rear wheel - is that right? Must I send the (two) brake drums, and are they removable, once I get the wheels back? My 1918 wheels are too poor a condition, so I need new ones. Any help would be appreciated. Willy
  8. I am downsizing my antique car projects. I have a 1928 Whippet coach, two door complete automobile, with a storage shed full of extra parts - transmissions, radiators, fenders, wheels, hubcaps, miscellaneous. Rolling on wheels, (Montana) title. Light surface rust, no through rust. Motor apart - has scratch on one cylinder, probably from broken ring. Will sell complete collection - won't separate, for $5000. Thirty five years of collecting parts left me with many Whippet parts to other years, so selling those off will pay back much of investment. Photos included. More photos available.
  9. nash lafayette 1937

    Don't know what year it is, but I have a special heater for a Nash La Fayette that goes just behind the front grille. I might have the small (brass?) nameplate that says, "La Fayette". I'm thinking a 1939, but not sure.
  10. The Horseless Carriage magazines are gone. Sorry willy
  11. I also have more "Automobile Engineering" - 1927, complete set of six volumes, in excellent condition, for $125; a collection of miscellaneous (8) Automobile Engineering, fair to good condition, plus four other antique auto books, $75. Will get some photos out soon.
  12. I just made a deal with someone. Will let you know if it falls through. Willy
  13. What is your best offer? I would like to get rid of these - just don't want to throw them in the garbage!
  14. These have NOT been sold.