KongaMan

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About KongaMan

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  1. `64 trans woes

    No idea; the pump's internal. Everything looked fine from the outside, if that's what you're asking. I'll also add this: I got it repaired at the local Buick dealer. It lasted about 1000 miles until it went out again in the middle of east Texas. Some good ol' boy working out of a quonset hut put in a new one for a fraction of what the dealer had charged, and said the old one got chewed up because it was installed incorrectly. That second pump is still in there today.
  2. On the assumption that you're responding to my comment about half-assery, I'll explain... It's important to understand what the STV does and how it works. In a nutshell, it varies the evaporator pressure, which, in turn, changes the temperature of the outlet air. It is controlled by the vacuum modulator attached to the temperature control on the dash: the less vacuum at the valve, the lower the evaporator pressure and the lower the outlet air temperature. Push the control all the way down, the vacuum to the valve drops to 0, the evaporator pressure drops, the air gets colder. Slide the control back up, the vacuum to the valve rises, the evaporator pressure rises, the air gets warmer. If the STV is replaced by a cycling switch, it's entirely different. In that setup, the evaporator pressure is always at its lowest setting; the outlet temperature is always as cold as it will go. The system is cycled according to feedback from a new temperature sensor on the evaporator. This is how it works: the system runs fullout until the sensor says it's too cold, then the compressor shuts off. When the sensor indicates it has warmed up, the compressor kicks on again. And so on. What you may have noticed is that you have no control over this: your temperature control is inoperative. You cannot change the temperature at the outlets. If you want it a little bit warmer (e.g.dehumidifiing on a cool, foggy evening ), you're SOL. IOW, you now have a cruder, less capable system. IMHO, it's far better to rebuild your STV (if that was problem) and keep the original functionality than to replace it with inferior components. NB: IIRC, the STV on the Riviera works differently from the STV used on other contemporary full-size Buicks. For those cars, higher vacuum at the valve lowers the evaporator pressure. This is why the the Riviera AC can be such a PITA to fix; it has some unique parts.
  3. Wise decision. While one might rationalize a switch to R134A, there's no doubt that you'll get better performance with R12. Replacing the STV with a cycling switch is just half-assery.
  4. `64 trans woes

    Would hope I'm wrong, but that's what mine sounded like when the front pump went.
  5. +1. Don't dodge the problem; fix it.
  6. Maybe not. Racing oils are generally made for a whole different performance profile. Without making a specific recommendation (because this can quickly turn into a religious argument), you might consider looking at an HDEO (High Demand Engine Oil) like the aforementioned Rotella T3, T5, or T6), Walmart (!) SuperTech, etc. rather than a conventional PCMO (Passenger Car Motor Oil). If you're leery of putting "diesel oil" in your car (don't be; they're certified for gas engines also), Mobil 1 High Mileage has a good bit more zinc than most. Just as important: don't skimp on the filter. There are a lot of recommendations for Wix 51049 or Purolator rather than the downmarket brands (Fram, AutoDeath house brand, etc.). BTW, NAPA filters are made by Wix.
  7. Those sound like it may be two different scenarios. If it warms at idle, that might be related to airflow across the condenser. Make sure that it's clear of debris, and make sure your fan clutch is working. If it warms under acceleration, it may be a vacuum issue that directs air away from the evaporator or a defective check valve at the intake manifold. If you have low vacuum at idle, that may also explain the first issue. Does the air flow change at all? That is, do you ever get get air from the heater vents when running the AC?
  8. Just press them out. You might get a clearer view if you pull the boots off so you can see what you're working with. Look carefully, though: when I did mine, one of the lower ball joints was tacked in on the stud side (not like the back side where the uppers were tacked). You sure all these parts are bad? Most of mine were (all but one upper ball joint), but a lot of these parts can be still serviceable. I get replacing ball joints because of the hassle involved, but steering parts are easy to revisit later. Did you check your idler arm and center link? Don't forget: don't tighten the LCA bushings until you have the weight back on the wheels.
  9. Just press them out. You might get a clearer view if you pull the boots off so you can see what you're working with. Look carefully, though: when I did mine, one of the lower ball joints was tacked in on the stud side (not like the back side where the uppers were tacked). You sure all these parts are bad? Most of mine were (all but one upper ball joint), but a lot of these parts can be still serviceable. I get replacing ball joints because of the hassle involved, but steering parts are easy to revisit later. Did you check your idler arm and center link? Don't forget: don't tighten the LCA bushings until you have the weight back on the wheels.
  10. There are a lot of recommendations for using Rotella T6 5w-40 (1264 ppm zinc, 1147 ppm phosphate; about 50% more than conventional PCMO) and Wix filters in older engines. If you're interested, Autozone currently has the oil for $60 for 2.5 gallons (enough for two oil changes), with a $12.50 rebate. And is that a five gallon jug or a five quart jug of Mobil 1 at Wally World?
  11. "Double" and "dual stage" are not synonymous. And if you replace a dual-stage diaphragm with a single stage diaphragm with two ports (note the word "stage"; it's important), you're using a different part that behaves differently. Much like gutting the STV and replacing it with a cycling switch, you have not duplicated the original functionality; you've changed it. Please look at section 11-16 a and Figure 11-73 of the 63 manual. They make a clear distinction between a single and a dual diaphragm. To be clear, the 63 has two single stage diaphragms and one dual stage diaphragm. If others refer to them incorrectly, that's on them. There's no need to propagate their error. To do so only sows confusion.
  12. The authority on collector cars

    Bingo. This is a hobby for old white men, and the interest frequently doesn't trickle down across generations. Folks who are trying to offload their departed dad's pre-war cars are shocked by the relative lack of interest and low offers. Now that the Happy Days generation is dying off, cars from the 50s are coming back to earth. T'will be the same with muscle cars in the near future. At some point, the bottom is going to fall out entirely, as it's hard to make a convincing case that the younger generation is as interested in cars of any stripe as their fathers and grandfathers were. Moral: buy something you like, because the payoff is going to be 100% emotional. And then your kids will sell it for pennies on the dollar.
  13. In 33 years you haven't fixed that rocker panel?
  14. Isn't that the opposite of the terminology that Buick uses in the service manual? The 64 manual clearly calls a diaphragm with two ports a "dual stage vacuum diaphragm": "Two dual stage vacuum diaphragms (see Figure 11-80) and two vacuum disc switches comprise the vacuum circuit for the 4700" The 63 manual doesn't make any such clarification in the illustrations, but it does in the text: " The #1 and #2 diaphragms are enclosed in a dual diaphragm assembly. The #3 and #4 are separate diaphragms."
  15. Just to clarify... I believe that the 63 has two single stage diaphragms and one dual stage, while 64 (and maybe 65) has two dual stage diaphragms. Is this not correct?