48Super

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About 48Super

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 07/21/1956

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Jacobus, PA
  1. OK guys here's some answers to your questions and comments: Yes the car is Verde Green. The combination of saddle interior with the green really looks great and get lots of compliments. If I could have purchased a GS new in '65, this is the combination I would have chosen. The car has the 4-note horns, rear defroster and remote trunk opener in addition to the visible options. The road wheels are in excellent condition and are correct as far as I can tell. The sport wheel and original horn bar are just about perfect (the wheel is on correctly, the front wheels were turned when the picture was taken). The chrome air cleaner is so nice it looks like it just came out of the box yesterday! Prior to my purchase, this car was in the same family since 1968. The previous owner and his father operated their own service station and this car lived there in its own bay for decades. The literature I have includes the original owners manual, accessories manual and service policy. No build sheet unfortunately. As far as what I'd like to replace it all I can say is I don't have anything in mind right now but I'll know it when I see it. I'm not in a hurry at all to sell the car so I can wait for a more favorable time. I'd like to have the money sitting in the bank so that when I do come across the right car I can jump right on it. I agree that really nice cars can be hard to come by and if I sell my Riviera I want to buy something equally as nice.
  2. Thanks for the responses so far. One of the reasons I asked this group for their opinions on price was I thought the Hagerty values were unrealistic because they depend so much on auction results. One guy with piles of money and no common sense might pay an astronomical price for a car to impress his buddies and that skews the data. I'm trying to determine a realistic price that a "normal" collector would be willing to pay as I would like to see this car go to an ROA or BCA member.
  3. I'm considering selling my '65 Gran Sport and I would appreciate your valuable input as to what would be a fair price to ask for the car. I would like to see it go a Riviera enthusiast and I have no interest in Ebay or an auction in order to sell it. Basically, this car is the kind you really want to find. It is not a perfect restored car but rather an unmolested, survivor car that has been well cared for and maintained over the years. I bought the car about four years ago and the previous owner had it for 41 years, he got from his father who bought it used in 1968. The current mileage is 99,000 and it runs and drives very well. Everything works including the headlights, A/C, radio and all other power accessories. The car was repainted back in the 70's and the paint is nice but far from perfect. The interior is completely original with the exception of reproduction floor mats and center console wood. The chrome is real nice, the die cast clamshell pieces have zero pits. As you can see from the pictures, I have cleaned, painted and detailed the engine compartment and the complete underside of the car. It has a new aluminized exhaust system and a NOS GS muffler. I have the original Protect-O-Plate to document that it is a genuine Gran Sport with matching numbers. I'm probably crazy for wanting to sell this car but my interests are changing and there are other cars I want to own before I check out to the big salvage yard in the sky. Thanks for taking time to read this.
  4. 1964 windshield

    Here are a few things I can tell you about using urethane adhesive. First of all, the installer I had would not use butyl tape because he claimed it would create a liability issue for him. Apparently, the urethane adhesive is considered far superior to butyl tape as far a strength goes. In newer cars, the windshield is considered a structural element of the body and urethane adhesive is needed to maintain that integrity. I saved pieces of the original windshield gasket material to show the installer how thick it was so that he could duplicate that thickness with the urethane. To get the right amount of adhesive, the installer trimmed a nozzle to a "V" shape and made a test application on a piece of scrap. Once he was satisfied, he applied a consistent bead around the opening. When the windshield was installed, the adhesive deformed in a controlled way and the results were excellent. This is why I looked long and hard for a guy who had experience with 60's GM windshields. If you can find someone who knows what they are doing, you can get excellent results with urethane.
  5. 1964 windshield

    I bought one through Pilkington Glass last summer (Part # DW00629 GS6) for $250. They sent it to my installer as part of a regular shipment so it only cost me a $10.00 boxing fee. By the way, the replacement fit perfectly and even included the correct date code etching. Installation cost me $200 but I had removed the the trim, old windshield, gasket and prepped everything for reinstallation. The installer used urethane adhesive applied from an electric-powered caulking gun and the results were excellent.
  6. 1960 T-Bird Excellent Original w/21000 miles

    Still for sale. Price lowered to $23,000
  7. For comparison here is what the all original saddle interior on my car looks like:
  8. FOR SALE: 1960 THUNDERBIRDMileage: 20,800Price:$23,000Location: Jacobus, PAOutstanding, low mileage original car. This car was stored from 1967 through 2001 when I purchased it with only 17,000 miles on it. It now has just under 21,000 and is in unbelievably nice condition. The body is totally rust free and the chrome looks like it is NOS. This T-Bird runs and drives like a new car.Body is absolutely rust free and exactly as Ford built it. The interior including the door panels, headliner, carpet and all the chrome and anodized aluminum trim is beautiful and appears as new.When removed from storage, the car was made operational by replacing the fuel tank, recoring the radiator, installing new wheel cylinders and master cylinder. The original carburetor and fuel pump were both rebuilt as well. All fluids were changed and Goodrich Silvertown tires matching the original spare were installed. The original exhaust system was just replaced two years ago with a correct style system in aluminized steel.This car still wears its 1967 PA inspection sticker and original oil change stickers from the 60's. I also have the original window sticker, build sheets and mint shop manual purchased by the original owner.The lower portion of the car was repainted, the roof, door jambs, trunk and engine compartment are still original. New seat covers were installed as the originals were split from age. The dashboard cover has also been replaced with a correct reproduction part.The only changes made to the car are the addition of period-style front seat belts and Sun Ray wheel cover ornaments.You can see pictures and read more about the car here:http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/sho...urvivor&page=2I'll be glad to supply more pictures and answer any questions you may have.Mike LawsonBuick8guy@yahoo.com
  9. You have a good selection of oil filters that will fit your car, here are some numbers to check for availability in Australia: AC Delco PF24 Fram PH25 Hastings LF212 Wix 51049 Purolator PER33 Air filters have less choice. For single carburetor engine: WIX 42084 For GS dual carburetor engine: Hastings AF26 All or the above parts are readily available through many sources here in the US, I hope you can find them down under.
  10. 1948 super convertible/ebay

    The car you are referring to once belonged to me. Here is the sale ad: Sure wish I could have gotten 60K for it when I sold it. Funny, the "professional appraisers" I spoke to said I'd be lucky to get 40K for it. I hope the new owner likes it, it was a GREAT car.
  11. Here is a period picture of an engine showing detail of how the fuel supply hose is routed through the AC/ alternator bracket. Notice that there is a depression stamped into the bracket where the hose contacts it.
  12. The rubber fillers you are referring to were only used on '63 & '64 Rivieras. The rear bumper was changed in '65 and the fillers were no longer needed.
  13. Still looking for one of these trunk release valves. If you have an extra you would like to sell, please let me know. THANKS!
  14. Here is a picture of the trunk release system parts from a 1965 Riviera. The vacuum tank was located on the passenger side lower firewall where it angles back towards the floorpan. The Accessories Section of the '65 shop manual will show you how everything was installed.
  15. Thanks for the responses. I suspected that the trunk release should hold the vacuum for a reasonable length of time. I think mine just had a defective check valve in the vacuum tank. The trunk release units on the '63-& '64 were a different style which had the release pull knob connected to a piston in a cylinder which created its own vacuum each time it was pulled, no leak down problems with this unit. I don't know why Buick changed to engine-supplied vacuum in 1965. Seems like this system required more parts and had more opportunities for malfunction. I got mine to work properly now so I'm happy.