pint4

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Posts posted by pint4


  1. My friend just bought a 1938 Packard 4 door sedan Senior Series that has been sitting for the past 40 years.  The car has 40,200 miles on it and runs and stops.  He has the keys to the locks that secure the side mount tires in place.  He is able to turn the key in the locks.  Even though he turns the key, something must not be working because everything just spins and doesn't engage the nut to remove it. Can anyone shed some light on what he might be missing?

    Thanks,

    Bob


  2. I have a 37 Packard 120 and am having problems with the brakes locking up.  A very experienced mechanic rebuilt the entire brake system all the way from master cylinder to each and every wheel.  He said the set-up process was very difficult.  He followed the set-up and adjustment procedures as outlined in the Packard shop manual yet as he set things up, one by one he had to work at extensively adjusting each wheel because first one would lock up and then another and then another.  Thought all were good to go and the car drove well for 100 miles and then this year for no apparent reason, the left rear locked up when coming to a stop at a light.  More adjusting and seems to be working but based on its history, not confident the problem won't come back at the worst possible time.  Has anyone had this problem?  Is there a trick to setting up the brakes?  As I mentioned, everything is new in the entire system.  Any input would be appreciated.  Hard to find people who still work on these older cars.  Thanks, Bob


  3. I have a 37 Packard 120 and am having problems with the brakes locking up.  A very experienced mechanic rebuilt the entire brake system all the way from master cylinder to each and every wheel.  He said the set-up process was very difficult.  He followed the set-up and adjustment procedures as outlined in the Packard shop manual yet as he set things up, one by one he had to work at extensively adjusting each wheel because first one would lock up and then another and then another.  Thought all were good to go and the car drove well for 100 miles and then this year for no apparent reason, the left rear locked up when coming to a stop at a light.  More adjusting and seems to be working but based on its history, not confident the problem won't come back at the worst possible time.  Has anyone had this problem?  Is there a trick to setting up the brakes?  As I mentioned, everything is new in the entire system.  Any input would be appreciated.  Hard to find people who still work on these older cars.  Thanks, Bob


  4. I am mounting outside rear view mirrors on the windshield posts on my 37PCKrd 120 Convertible Coupe.  I have to drill and tap four small holes for mounting screws in the chrome.  What is the best way to do it to avoid causing damage to the chrome plating beyond the holes being drilled?

    Thanks,

    Bob


  5. If they are side lights, then because they are not very large but are still substantial and quite well made and robust, one might think they would go on a larger car like a Packard or Pierce Arrow from the 30's.  The rubber piece under the nut that conforms to the bracket threw me off a bit.  Looks like an unique fit.


  6. Are these running lights or very small fog light like one would use on a sports car?  The lens is only about 3 3/4"-4" diameter and is flat.  They look to be specific to a certain vehicle versus universal. 

    Actually considered they could be for a motorcycle.

    Thanks for looking.

     

     

    DSCN1031.JPG.ee1d43be0408f856be72db785f773643.JPGDSCN1032.JPG.20abc74e08effa2302a65f94d7492ca8.JPGDSCN1030.JPG.38d6c6c265485bc93e5b5ad1c289133c.JPG 

     

     


  7. Please PM me if you require an outside rear view mirror for your restoration and we will add your name to the list as we go through the inventory and get back to you if we find one that meets your needs.  We have a significant number of mirrors produced by Jay Fisher as well as some repro hood ornaments and other miscellaneous items manufactured by Jay.  Jay Fisher mirrors are on some of the finest restorations.  There are also a limited number of engraved mirrors with the marque engraved on the mirror housing.  Thanks.


  8. Thank you. I am impressed. I would never have figured them out on my own and I certainly would have never thought the last one was a McLaughlin-Buick. The P for Plymouth makes sense as does the De for Desoto. The Chrysler "C" is very ornate.

    • Like 1

  9. I am not familiar with the design on these hubcaps. I think they are off very early cars. Can someone shed some light on the year and name of the cars that might have used these hubcaps?

     

    I think the one with a "P" might be Packard or Pierce-Arrow. The Overland was the easy one but not sure of the year. 

     

    Thanks.

     

    IMG_6294.JPG.05a0eae43bcbb01768c7aca06b119f71.JPG

     

    IMG_6296.JPG.c4995265269e5460f03e9b8596270aa3.JPG?

     

    IMG_6293.JPG


  10. Are the numbers above for example or how they should actually look?  Does any one have the 0 and the A-Z showing the correct font and size?  To do a data plate right, it might be quite challenging.  I would like it to look authentic as best as possible using a repro plate to start with.  The question is where to start and finding someone who can do it right.  Thanks,


  11. I am looking for some assistance from someone who has a set of the correct outside rear view mirrors mounted on the windshield posts on their 1937 Packard 120 Convertible Coupe. Using reference points on the windshield post, I am looking for dimensions that show the exact location of the base and screws that hold the mirror in place.
    Thanks,
    Bob


  12. I was leaning that way. It is always a tough call but repainting does take a way some of the character and originality. 

     

    I have a 1926 Cadillac two-speed shaft driven pedal car that is all original and in extremely nice condition. I came within an inch of tearing it apart and painting it. I was looking at it the other day and I was sure glad I didn't restore it. If I had, it wouldn't have looked much different than all the imported reproductions. And technically I am only the second owner. The original owner received it as a Christmas gift from his brother at a very young age and took really good car of it. It meant a lot to him. Now it is my turn to be caretaker of it for the next generation.

    • Like 1