alsancle

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Everything posted by alsancle

  1. Wow. You have done pretty well to be hanging around this hobby and not get caught on a car! Next car I make money on will probably be the first
  2. We have been posting some MB stuff in other threads and there really should be an appropriate landing spot for some of these pictures and thoughts. Btw, one of the only English speaking websites that I know of where you could find information on prewar Mercedes Benz is the 170-220 forum. There is some great stuff on that site but their focus tends to be around the smaller engined cars so in this thread I would like to concentrate more on the full classic chassis, 290, 320, 380, 500, 540, etc. I've been lucky enough to see and touch many great Classics but the materials, fit & finish on the 1930s Mercedes was one of the best. Also, MB was a leader in technical advances including 4 wheel independent suspension in the 1933 380. The driver activated supercharger on the K,S,SS,380,500k, 540k and 770k to my knowledge is very unique. Only Stutz had tried a similar system in 1929.
  3. Bob is the MAN. He's the one that pointed me to the Cusik-Schumacher special that ran in the Vanderbilt Cup and eventually got me to the origin of my Stutz. Frank, the best thing my mom ever told me (and I was about 12) was that 99.9 percent of the stuff you worry about never happens. I started keeping track and she was right. Of course, that doesn't mean something you are not worried about doesn't come up and bite you in the rear end!
  4. You are right about the proportions not being conveyed. I'm not sure why. If I bought the car, I think I would do the following: 1. Change the wheel and brake drum color. 2. Add a pin stripe 3. Add the rear spare cover or maybe double the rear spare. If I was selling the car, I think I would just try #1, as when you are selling, putting money in to items that can be considered "taste" issues could be counter productive.
  5. Bob, that looks like a great show. I'm going to be on vacation with the wife so unfortunately I won't be able to attend. Frank, it took me 10 years of going by Bob's spot at Hershey looking for him before I gave up. Then at Pebble Beach last year this good looking dude shows up and introduces himself as Bob. We you get the Nash running Ed and I will come down you can drive us around the yard sitting on milk crates. Will be my first ride in a prewar Nash. I have a few I need to tick off the list.
  6. Good words of advice Frank. I try hard to only post positive comments. If you knew me you would know that doesn't come naturally :). Of course, I do have hard time controlling myself with regards to my disdain for whitewalls, trippe lights, doodads, and guys that walk around a high end car auction with a NADA price guide in their hand.
  7. John, ok with most of your suggestions although asking someone to spend money on something that they are trying to sell is risky. For example, every car I buy I get the trippe lights off within 24 hours and either give them to a friend with less taste than me or unload them at Hershey.
  8. Eddy, I'll ask him today. The complexity of the P1 is something you hear a lot. I'm a big believer in "doing what you know" and there are only so many cars you can get comfortable with in in one lifetime. The other thing about Packard is a guy can start with a $1500.00 110 and work his way up the ladder to a 3.5 million dollar Dietrich Split windshield and never leave the marque. I don't know if there are any other manufacturers were you can quite do that. You are usually stuck at the bottom, middle or top of the range.
  9. A picture of the Packard. http://www.ebay.com/itm/1931-Packard-Super-8-/232324524448
  10. Frank, I'll try to remember to ask. If he was big in the CCCA then my dad would know, but if he was more of a pure Packard guy then maybe not. Did you see the 31 845 Roadster on eBay? I'm not a green fan but the green on that car looks fantastic. JV, always interesting how we gravitate to a particular place. I think the T is probably popular for just the reasons you may not like it. Have always liked the P1 Springfields and they have felt "reasonable" for some of the lesser body styles. The 2 convertible sedans that Gullwing was selling were pretty cool. But, having never driven or tried to maintain one I'm just observing and do not really know anything about them. I assume given your location you have been over to Mr Laferriere's place?
  11. We need a thread to post pictures of Classic era Peerless automobiles. Fortunately we have a resident expert in Peerless (Jeff Brown) who knows just about every single car. I will admit I have never seen a eight cylinder car in person. My first exposure was when Tom Laferriere sold this one back in 2011.
  12. Is that your Saloon?
  13. A 4 door limo on a 380 chassis? I'm not sure they made very many or any of those. There are very few 4 door bodies on the 380/500/540 chassis because it is really not that long. If they did make one it would be priced less than this car.
  14. The Model T crowd is everywhere, but is that considered brass?
  15. Some years look better than others with the fender lights. Ed can give more detail but Pierce was using ball bearings for the spring shackle mounts instead of bushings, just to give you an idea. The problem I have is that while American styling was hitting is high water mark (in my opinion) between 32 and 36 Pierce was turning out some awkward visuals. Not all of them, as there are some really good looking ones, but many. That said, I would love to have a PA some day. I had a shot at this one and should have bought it but Ed didn't push hard enough.
  16. 1. Agree on the white brake covers, might be able to improve quite a bit with maroon just on those. 2. The green car above has 2 major advantages over the subject car, 1. Its a club sedan not a open rear quarter sedan, 2. Wires vs Wood spokes. Generally agree with everybody's comments.
  17. Ed is a build quality elitist because of Pierce Arrow which had the greatest build quality of any American manufacturer but not the greatest style. He comes around eventually on style. Also, he's the only guy I know that can look at the hinges or door handles from 40 feet away on any Classic and tell you the manufacturer.
  18. I would say that 1/2 of what I consider my good car friends started off as "internet buddies". Would you agree that within about 10-12 posts or so you can figure out if you like someone?
  19. It seems that "customers" or "clients" or even "bosses" or "employees" can become friends over time when mutual respect becomes clear to all parties.
  20. Eddy, 3 window or club coupe?
  21. Frank, any car guy that wouldn't love either of these two is not a car guy. Theoretically the CCCA should accept my Stutz as it is documented by a professional body builder who advertised and built a series of cars. It was done on a new chassis which I also have documentation of. Not a home build. But regardless, if it was done by somebody unknown but prior to WWII I would love it just as much. If it was done in the 40s or 50s I would still love it but not quite as much. I could equally love those two Lasalle's if somebody finds either one
  22. As someone who had a 49 2 door special deluxe plymouth foisted on him in HS (thanks Dad!!!) I can tell you it is the styling followed by power plant. Everybody called it the pumpkin. Car was 100% reliable, but 55 was just about the top end. The wayfarer roadster and the business coupes have a pretty strong following. You will probably pay 15k plus for a running wayfarer and 20 plus for a nice one.
  23. The boat tail is cool. If we are doing Lasalle show and tell here is another one. http://theoldmotor.com/?p=150974
  24. There are simple demographics and changing interests and tastes at work. In 1970 how many teenage males could 1). Drive a standard transmission. 2) Change the oil in their car. How may can do it now? Most plain jane four door sedans will eventually become parts cars for the more desirable body styles. It is inevitable as the pool of guys skilled enough to maintain or restore the cars shrinks. I don't worry about it as the cars are enjoyable to me, and there will also be SOMEBODY else to talk about them, even if there are not LOTS of guys in the hobby.
  25. Our buddy 540k pointed out Gullwing has this 380 for sale. Introduced at the Berlin Motor Show in 1933, the 380 was the first in a line of legendary automobiles built by Mercedes-Benz. The 380K was the very first of the supercharged eight-cylinder luxury cars that include famous models such as the 500K, 540K, and 770. With just 154 built during 1933 and 1934 it is also one of the most exclusive. These 380K rarely appear on the market and this marks the first time that Gullwing Motor Cars has ever offered one of these fine Mercedes-Benz classics for sale. This 380K was sold in November 1934 and was ordered with exquisite and beautifully proportioned Cabriolet coachwork by Sindelfingen, the in-house coachbuilder for Mercedes-Benz. This particular car has been beautifully restored and was part of two prominent American collections over the past three decades. This Cabriolet is a genuine, matching-numbers example, with build numbers and delivery details confirmed by a Mercedes-Benz Classic Zertifikat. Here is an incredibly rare opportunity to own one of the most rare and beautiful supercharged Mercedes-Benz automobiles of the 1930s. An incredible value at only $ 725,000. http://www.gullwingmotorcars.com/1933-mercedes-benz-380k-cabriolet-c-c-3201.htm