Bhigdog

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Bhigdog last won the day on July 28 2016

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About Bhigdog

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    Grand High Exalted Mystic Ruler
  • Birthday 01/06/1940

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Eastern, PA
  • Interests:
    anything mechanical. I like moving parts

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  1. It depends on your local parts store. My NAPA guys have all the old paper catalogs and books and X references. They've helped me find rings, valves and other parts for old engines by sizes rather than application....................Bob
  2. Inelegant but possible..............Bob
  3. Couple of three ways. Fill the bushing 1/2 full of grease and drive a tight fitting rod or dowel into the bushing. Hydraulic pressure of the grease acting behind the bushing forces it up and out. Or: Run a tap into the bushing and either bottom the tap out to push it up or use a bolt and slide hammer to pull it. Or: If you have a lathe or vertical milling machine cut most of it out and pick out the rest. Grease and dowel is simplest but messy. I like simple. If you go the grease method make sure you support the cover at the bottom and not on the sides or you will warp it...............Bob
  4. Not quite complete set up. you need a thin steel strip (hack saw blade) on the top of each segment to see if it vibrates (growls).................Bob
  5. I do have a boot but no ID on it. Cars Inc, the NJ Buick guys, have one listed @ $11.50................Bob
  6. My cars sit more than drive. Got tired of always cranking for a minute or removing the air cleaner to prime the carb. I put electrics on them to fill the carb before starting and turn them off to drive. No worries about noise or a pump fed engine fire............Bob
  7. Seems to me I bought two and have one still in the box. Ready to walk out the door to go to dinner. I'll look tomorrow unless someone else pops up with the answer before then.............Bob
  8. The clerk was likely a recent college grad with a BS in some "soft" discipline and a huge loan balance. He couldn't get in with Starbucks (not arrogant enough). McDonalds had all the burger flippers they need. So.............he's a highly educated ACE key cutter that can't find his butt with both hands. Oy Vey...................Bob
  9. But moving it from side to side, as you mentioned, doesn't change the rotation direction of the engine. Changing the direction the starter faces (pinion facing fore or aft) will change the direction the engine rotates. Just sayin. We likely both mean the same thing...............Bob
  10. You might want to draw some circles and rotation arrows with the starter on either side of the car.....................................Bob
  11. True, but not nearly as interesting...............Bob
  12. I'm thinking solid wire would be better for this application. Scrounge up a piece of 14 ga house romex wire and use the ground or strip the plastic off of the hot or neutral..................Bob
  13. You can see (I can) the trace of the missing wire from the commutator bar to the slot in question. During manufacture and after the wires are placed in the slots a fibre strip is wedged in the slot and the entire armature is dipped in shellac to lock everything in place. You need to carefully dig out enough of the fibre strip to expose the broken wire end. It should be very near the end of the slot. That done, I'm assuming you are familiar enough to solder and insulate the splice wire in place and solder it to the commutator bar. The splice wire can be bare copper but be sure it does not touch the steel armature laminations at any point and do use string/super glue/epoxy to lock everything in place after the repair............Bob
  14. Looks to me one winding separated from the commutator and that damaged the field insulation before breaking away. Twer it me, and having way too much free time, I would try to save it if the field coils showed continuity and were not grounded. All this is maybe doable, can't tell from the pix. Splice a piece of 14 GA wire from the broken end to the commutator. Fix/splice any other damaged wires. Put it back together and see if it charges. If so wrap the wires behind the commutaor with string and super glue them to stabilize the repair. Turn the commutator. New brushes and bearing/bushings. Maybe wishful thinking on my part but I would try. If it all worked I'd paint it up and buy myself a cigar and a nice cold Yuengling Lager................Bob
  15. Yup................Bob