NTX5467

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Everything posted by NTX5467

  1. NTX5467

    2007 Lucerne Brake Weirdness

    Interesting ponderance, Barney! On my former 2000 Impala, the clunking attributed to the intermediate shaft declined about 90% with some Moog outer tie rod ends. With the 2005 that replaced it, not quite so much. As things have evolved, there are some "work-around" for the bells and whistles of many current model vehicles. An iPad and WiFi hotspot (in many newer GM cars) would replace any nav system (for not much more than ONE map upgrade), plus Google Maps. Back-up cams have become more economical to purchase and are better hidden. Some vehicles really need them more than others! Many base models are now better-equipped than a late 1950s luxury car. But with 30+mpg highway fuel economy. Radial tires, multi-speed automatics, multi-source sound systems, tinted glass, etc. The newer ones go around corners and stop better, but I think Old-Tank is working on that. NTX5467
  2. NTX5467

    When Did BCA Fees go to $50 per year?

    To somewhat complicate factors . . . a "financial statement" can be difficult to interpret unless you have a knowledge of the information and how it is presented. That's just my observation. It can run from a simple "take in, pay out" document to an itemized list of all transactions. Such detail can be open for micro-management orientations, by observation, by some. Yet, some more generalized "+"/"-" summaries can be helpful. I also suspect that if some of the members knew how much some things cost, they might be surprised . . . even if the "lowest-cost/highest value" vendors were already being used. I recall reading the BOD minutes each chapter used to get, in the later 1980s. There was concern that the magazine was costing too much, which was also the club's largest single expense back then. Some KS members wanted it re-bid each year or so. At that time, the magazine was edited for a former BOD member's wife, whose husband owned the printing company that printed the magazine. As it turned out, the BOD was comfortable with the costs involved and no changes were made until years later. In reality, to me, the BCA is much bigger than just a larger local car club. That means more costs involved in must basic operations. Certainly, there's income from advertising in the magazine. I also suspect it's competitive with other national club publications, but I don't know that for sure. If it was too much, they wouldn't be there. We've been though discussions about monthly vs. bi-monthly publications several times, citing how other clubs seem to get by with fewer issues of more pages. In reality, I doubt that really saves money as postal costs can increase with publication weight. We've had the plastic wraps deleted, which had a negative affect upon the condition of the publication when it was received by the member. As I understand, the bag is now (or had been) funded by an un-named donor. There have been discussions about the type of paper, even, and its relative cost. Personally, I like the quality of the current publication and hope it continues! The total package is great! I just looked at a recent niche car magazine devoted to a particular brand of vehicle. A magazine from the newsstand at the grocery store. I needed a magnifying glass to find the price on the barcode area. It was $7.95 for a normal car magazine type of publication. That's ONE issue with thinner paper and smaller print than "The Bugle". Six of those equates to the total cost of BCA membership, which includes "The Bugle" (print version) in the mix. Certainly, I have discretion to buy or not buy, but even if I buy 4 over the course of a year, individually, it's still close to the total cost of BCA membership. The E-Bugle membership exists to help those overseas members get advertisement information in as timely (or better) manner as those who get normal USPS delivery in the USA get their magazines. I don't believe the suspected number of print magazine memberships decreased as much as many suspected they might? Be that as it may. Certainly, we might forego some advertisement income one month of the year for a summarized financial statement of the BCA's financial health might happen. The number of pages in each issue is tightly controlled, due to production issues and such. In the mean time, from what I've seen over my decades of casually observing BCA operations and such, which may or might not make me an "expert" by any means, but I believe things are being done as good as they can be. I trust the BOD to continue that past history. The questions I have had over the years, were answered by those they were posed to. Willis Bell 20811
  3. NTX5467

    When Did BCA Fees go to $50 per year?

    Matt, I meant no ill will in my comments, just an observation that we tend to hear the same comments about "dues increases" from different members every time a dues increase is hinted at. This has been happening since I've been in the BCA (which pre-dates the current server of our forum hosts). The one exception was at the last CO meet when the increase was to fund "The Bugle" in a better manner. To allow it to continue in the great manner which Pete put it on. Which was approved by the membership. I suspect the BOD is making good financial decisions for the BCA, as it should. With declining membership income, some expenses will be relatively constant as others can vary one way or the other. Be that as it may. NTX5467
  4. NTX5467

    2007 Lucerne Brake Weirdness

    There were some issues with brake light switches on a generation of '90s full-size GM pickups. In that case, brake lights staying on and running the battery down overnight. The cruise runs the stepper motor in the electronic throttle control system. Not vacuum operated any more! Glad the fix was simple and not too expensive! NTX5467
  5. NTX5467

    When Did BCA Fees go to $50 per year?

    (I just looked at the last page, this time . . .) Interesting that these discussions never really seem to diminish OR generate different orientations of what is what. Operating costs increase, so "best use of funds" becomes more important with each passing year. You can also put "continuous improvement" into the mix too, to hopefully amplify any better ways of doing things. If there is a concern about future dues increases, then purchase a multi-year membership. That might give you a better yearly cost. THEN start saving for the next membership payment in the future. NTX5467
  6. NTX5467

    Which engine oil grade to use with 56

    I suspect that zddp kind of made-up for the poorer film thickness of the "dino" motor oils of earlier times, in anti-wear issues. With the more modern blendstocks AND synthetic formulation, zddp levels could well be safely decreased with no issues. Remember, the original Comp Cams recommendation was "Rotella T or synthetic". Rotella T, at that time, was a "dino" oil. Diesel "dino" oil was either straight weight or 15W-40. Synthetic 5W-40 diesel oil wasn't around back then, as it is now. In much more current times, 10W-30 diesel synthetic oil has become available, as have "syn blends". Back in the later 1960s when motor oil "super oils" (10W-50, for example, with their wide viscosity range from improved chemistry), there were also many oil additives on the market to help "normal" oils along a little bit. This was also close to the height of the increased lift/longer duration/higher rpm capable/high horsepower V-8 engines. STP was usually the most recognizable oil additive, used by many racers. It was an oil thickener which was supposed to increase the oil film strength for higher-load situations . . . one of which could have been the higher loads at the cam lobe/lifter interface. ONE of the competitors was named "STUD", with a tailed-devil graphic as its logo. Reading the container, it had a long word starting with "z" (most probably zincdithiophosphate?) that talked about "high load" protection. It was not until years later than I connected that additive with the cam lobe wear issues of the '80s. That additive only lasted a few years, that I know of. The reason for the "super oils" was the response to the bigger, more powerful, higher operating temp, engine operating conditions of that time. It might well have been when zddp levels were increased? Just that we didn't know about zddp per se back then, OR why it was needed? And things have progressed from there! NTX5467
  7. The DOT3 fluid is still around almost everywhere. DOT4 has a higher temp rating, but that's not needed for a convertible top application. The DOT5 fluid is silicone and the other version of DOT5 (DOT5.1?) is synthetic. Last time I looked. DOT4 appeared, in GM, with the Aussie Pontiac GTO cars, as I recall. All other GM cars still used DOT3 at that time. NTX5467
  8. NTX5467

    Disk Brake Conversion

    Back in the late 1960s, a FMVSS regulation allegedly came online which put a maximum brake pedal pressure to be used for max-effort stops. I seem to recall that some disc/drum cars still had stellar stopping performance with bias-belted tires. One car stood out, a '69 Olds 442 W-30, which pulled more than 1G stopping power in a CAR LIFE road test. When I researched the brake pads on that car, they were normal GM-spec linings which fit a multitude of vehicles and nothing special or "HP" on the rear drum linings either. The reason was that the braking of my '77 Camaro was not nearly what it should have been, in my estimation. On the Camaro, they put an organic pad on the outside and a metallic pad on the inside, to decrease brake dusting on the wheels. My research indicated that in many aftermarket replacement pads, "they were all the same, from Nova to C-30 trucks". Then came the '79 Police Nova! Great stopping performance, compared to other similar cars. A set of those brake pads and the Camaro stopped better than ever. Special pads? The same as on '79 Cadillac limos. Adding the '81 Z/28 "export" 11x2 rear brakes (same as the later mid-'80s Caprice police cars AND '77 Monte Carlo) and THEN it finally stopped with confidence with a really good pedal feel. ALL bolt-on, in stock GM items. On the '90s Caprices, the Chevys and Cadillacs had rear disc brakes with an existing Chevy 10-bolt rear axle. More bolt-on stuff! The similar Roadmasters had 11x2 rear drums. Brake frictions are undergoing another issue as the copper in the formulations must be removed by a certain date in the future. Something about the copper coimponents showing up in river water, which was affecting the fish in the rivers. As for our vintage vehicles, back in the later '50s, Chrysler was using full-metallic brake linings on their police cars with great results (in continued stopping performance in the CHP police car tests (www.allpar.com, Chrysler Squads, Curtis Redgap chronicles). That lining was provided by a small brake rebuilder in Amarillo, TX, as I recall, but it worked better than anything else. The '61 Chevy Impala SS had segmented metallic linings from the factory, but many removed them for regular linings as they couldn't stage the car at the drag strip with "cold" metallic linings that didn't grip very well until they were hot. In a long-prior thread on brake linings, Old-Tank mentioned that on his '55 Buick that one "name brand " lining was too hard and didn't stop very well on his car. The other "name brand" stopped better on his car. In the world of brake pad frictions, there is a "side code" on the side edge of the friction material. That code has a sequence of letters and numbers to identify the manufacturer, batch number, and cold/hot frictional characteristics of the friction material itself. I suspect that drum brake linings are similar. For stopping purposes, the letter codes are significant. Seems like they start at "C" and end at "F"? Higher letters are best. One person was seeking some good linings for an autocross car he was putting brakes on and also driving daily. Seems that one auto supply chain's "house brand" brake pads had "EE" temperature codes, which is as good as it gets until you get into the race-only higher ratings. He was surprised and pleased. You can probably Google "brake friction side codes" to verify which codes are what. These ratings are separate and apart from the statements by the brake pad/lining vendors of "proper fit and function" for your particular vehicle. In short, just purchasing a quality brand might not be enough to get the best braking performance. I'm not sure what the brake re-lining industry has for their performance specs. If the truck materials would work on cars, for example. It might be good to ask these questions if you might get a set of your drum brake shoes re-lined in the future. So, things aren't quite as generic as we might have perceived. NTX5467
  9. Is it Permatex #2? Sealant, not gasket maker. NTX5467
  10. NTX5467

    Disk Brake Conversion

    More to the point of drum vs disc brakes . . . I was talking to a performance enthusiast at a cruise event two years ago. We were talking about the Wilwood brake kits. He thought a bit and said that he actually thought that large drum brakes actually stopped "better" than the Wilwoods he put on one vehicle. BUT the Wilwoods would stop the same all day long and the drums wouldn't do that. Driving non-abs cars with drum brakes, usually easier to "lock 'em up" and leave skid marks with power drum brakes. NTX5467
  11. NTX5467

    Disk Brake Conversion

    Many claim the newer ceramic disc brake pads "don't dust", but they do. Just that the dust isn't darker, so its lighter beige color doesn't show up nearly as easily on wheels and such. But it's still there and would show on wire wheel spokes. The issue with the wheel/caliper clearance is the shape of the backside of the wheel rim. NOT just the wheel diameter itself. Disc brakes have their benefits and their ultimate installation costs might be less than different sheet metal on the car. BUT . . . most panic stops only happen once and in those cases, it's "tire rubber/pavement friction interfaces" that can be more important than what kind of brakes are on the car. NOT the same as driving in the mountains where added fade resistance can be important. OR the same as trying to slow down enough to make that turn at the end of a 1/4 mile drag strip. The question might be "Why are you driving something with K-H wires on it in tight city traffic or on a drag strip? Might driving style be a better change, to allow for more following distance between other cars on the road? Respectfully, NTX5467
  12. NTX5467

    Which engine oil grade to use with 56

    "Short answers" above. "Longer answers" below . . . Oil viscosity? I believe you'll find that as the ambient temps cool and stay that way, thinner oils were recommended, town to "10W" viscosities. More about oil flow at initial start-up than anything else. Same engine thermostat temps as warmer climates, so operating temps were ultimately the same. Depending upon engine wear, oil consumption might have been a little greater, but that might be more dependent upon the style of scraper on the oil rings and valve stem seals/guide clearances. Most people usually ran "30" motor oils back then for "Above 32 degrees F" temperatures. Using thicker oils in warmer climates could have worked if the internal clearances had wear on them, but a band-aid fix at best. In some of the much higher temp regions, "40" oil might have worked best, BUT that was when an oils level of protection tended to be related to its viscosity rather than the oil's base blendstocks and additive package. NOT that way, nearly to that degree, any more. As for zddp levels, I believe that Old-Tank has been using Castrol GTX motor oils in his '55 Buick for many thousands of miles with no valve train wear issues. Zddp issues didn't really exist in the times when the Nailheads were designed (in the early '50s). It was not until the earlier '60s when longer duration camshafts with higher valve lift levels and much stiffer valve springs (to allow for 7000rpm in NASCAR engines) that cam lobe wear issues needed the higher levels of zddp. Of course, nobody talked about it back then, either, except hose involved in building those engines. PLUS oil was usually changed much more frequently! So that's when zddp levels started to increase and many used STP Oil Treatment to compensate for any weakness in their oil's toughness against wear. The cam lobe wear issues surfaced first from the engine rebuilder industry. The OEMs use a thicker Parkerizing surface treatment on their cam lobes, but the aftermarket cam makers probably didn't, such that the normal cam installation paste lube and GM EOS were sufficient lube to get the cam lobes past their first 30 minutes of run/break-in time. When the zddp levels were decreased, THEN their corner-cutting showed up. "SL" oil was the last oil spec that many tend to agree as having enough zddp in it. Those oils were 1000ppm zddp, which is also where the synthetic SL oils that VW recommends for their car diesels which run the fuel injection pump off of one cam lobe. Mobil1's "Turbo Diesel Truck" 5W-40 oils usually were spec'd at 1000ppm of zddp, but Rotella T and Delo 400 "dino" 15W-40 oils usually had more like 1400ppm, initially. Same with their synthetic 5W-40 oils. Now, with tighter diesel emissions, it's more like 1200ppm, but still well past the "SL" oils' 1000ppm. GM still builds crate motors with flat tappet camshafts in them. I looked in the engine installation instructions (which are also available online) for one of their 427 Chevy engines a few years ago. I was not surprised to see that their oil recommendation was "SM" motor oil (the spec at the time I looked). BUT they are dealing with OEM-level cam Parkerizing surface treatment of the cam lobes and valve lifters of specs they built themselves. These engines are run on a test stand after being built, as production engines were, so their lobes are lubed and a known motor oil is run through them, and they are initially run in a controlled environment. So, it all works. Once the cam gets past that initial run-in period, the cam/lifter interface is much slicker and the need for higher levels of anti-friction compounds is greatly reduced. I have a copy of the paper GM did to validate the use of "SM" oils in flat tappet engines. They used the weight loss from the valve lifters to gauge wear levels. Surprisingly, these wear levels were very similar to those with "SL" and prior oils. Perhaps the BEST place to look at oil analysis (used and unused "virgin" motor oil) is www.bobistheoilguy.com, click on "Oil Forums" and then on "Virgin Motor Oil Analysis". Participants post independently-done oil analysis for various motor oils, unused virgin oil, which details the level of additives in the oil, its viscosity, and sometimes the TBN and TAN levels. Most of the modern "SN" and "SM" oils have 800ppm of zddp. The prior "SL" oils were at 1000ppm zddp. The "diesel-spec" oils (Rotella T 15W-40, for example) were at 1400ppm zddp. The more recent diesel oils are closer to 1200ppm zddp, due to emissions regulations. Their TBN is also slightly lower, too. By comparison, the Amsoil Synthetic "Z-Rod" oil is about 1400ppm zddp. One of the changes in the most recent diesel oil specs is that the TBN of the oil has been lowered, for some reason. Ford didn't allow its use in their new PowerStrokes for a time, but now do. I haven't researched to see what the deal was with that. Higher TBN means that the oil can absorb more acidic combustion by-products before the TBN reaches "2.0", which is when most fleet administrators who use oil analysis to gauge when to change motor oil, desire to change their fleet's oil. That meant, in one case, oil change intervals were decreased from 25K miles to 22.5K miles. All depending upon how the vehicle is used and how many cold start cycles happen. Some engines are harder on motor oil than others, both in oil contaminants and how soon the oil "shears" out of its original viscosity range. Zddp is the most visible anti-wear additive in motor oil, but there are others that are just as effective (but more expensive). Adding "external" zddp to an existing lower zddp oil can work BUT if you add too much, the cleanliness/detergency additives can be compromised. The Joe Biggs Racing racing oil has something like 3000ppm of zddp, but then it gets changed every 500 miles. So, discretion can be the better part of valor in adding too much zddp for not a lot more "protection". Joe Gibbs also has a specific motor oil for direct-injected gasoline motors, too. When the issue of zddp levels and "replacement aftermarket camshafts" first arose, Comp Cams' recommendation was "either Rotella T or synthetic motor oil". Rotella T for its obvious higher zddp (anti-wear) levels and synthetic oil for its tougher oil film (anti-wear) composition. That told me that the aftermarket people probably put enough Parkerizing on their cams to get them by with the higher zddp levels, but not enough to get them by with the lower zddp levels. I also suspected that each would have their own "oil additive" for their cams, which most had available within a few years. THEN, some offered "an optional extra" of a thicker Parkerizing coating on their aftermarket cams! To me, that verified my earlier suspicions of why things were happening as they tended to. Hardened valve seats in a Buick Nailhead? From what others who've done that have mentioned, probably not a good idea to put seats in a Buick Nahilead cylinder head until valve seat recession might require it. The water passages in the head, near the valve seats, tend to be closer to the combustion chamber than on other GM engines, so it's easier to break through to the water passageway when doing the cutting to install the seats. And that means finding another cylinder head, usually. The particular higher-nickel metallurgy that Buick used in their engines and cylinder heads didn't really need to have "hard seats" or "induction hardened" valve seats prior to the early-1970s announcement that all GM engines would have hardened valve seats so their engines could run on unleaded fuel with no maintenance issues. Chevys and others needed them, Buicks didn't. But they had to comply anyway. Enjoy! NTX5467
  13. The fluid used in the convertible top cylinders MUST be compatible with the seals in the power cylinders and pump. UNLESS it's been converted OR a newer-spec fluid has been flushed through and into the system, that original GM specification brake fluid (now DOT3, I believe, is the equivalent of the Delco Supreme fluid, which is "normal brake fluid, anyway) should be used. Used CAREFULLY due to its negative affect upon painted surfaces! Convertible top fluid probably should have been a particular viscosity of either hydraulic fluid (as power steering fluid) or motor oil, but brake fluid was of ONE viscosity and it was "everywhere", so that was the fluid of choice. As generic as hydraulic fluid and motor oil might have been, there were many different formulations and additive packages, other than just normal viscosity . . . all of which could affect the pump's ultimate performance AND would need costly and time-consuming flushes to get things right again. So, "common old brake fluid" was the fluid of choice for many years. You CAN get the hydraulic system converted to a (now) better fluid. Some of the convertible mechanism supply shops have it. Possibly it is compatible with the existing brake fluid, too? But for now, I'd recommend you use the normal brake fluid (DOT3 or DOT4) non-synthetic brake fluid from a closed container. Brake fluid still absorbs moisture, as in the past. There is also a recommendation that when the hydraulic rams are extended, to wipe the exposed surfaces with a rag moistened with brake fluid to keep them clean. Again, be very careful to protect any painted surfaces from brake fluid drops! NTX5467
  14. NTX5467

    Wildcat 4-speeds, 1965

    The '65-'66 Buick full-size cars were some of the BEST LOOKING Buicks every designed, as far as I'm concerned. Everything was "right" and still looks that way. An "honest" design in some many respects. As everything was about "big engine torque", there was generally plenty of power with the existing automatic transmissions (as automatic transmissions were a definite Buick orientation for decades, at that time). That makes the 4-speed cars a very small niche which further magnified the torque in a positive manner and probably changed the whole "feel" of the car, too. I do seem to recall some "Gran Sport" full-size Buicks from the '65 model year. One of our chapter members had one. Kind of obscure badging in the grille, but it was there. Certainly not a high-volume model by any means. I believe that many other Wildcats had basically the same "guts", just not the specific bits that made the Gran Sport what it was. Possibly similar with Riviera models, too? Congrats on getting your "special" Buick going! NTX5467
  15. NTX5467

    1971 LeSabre production numbers question

    By observation, not all car companies (and divisions thereof) kept production data that many now have become interested in. To many, once the model year was over, any reviews were done, the information was "archived" and then disposed of when file space was needed. Just "thrown away" . . . UNLESS somebody had the foresight to archive it "off-site" and away from prying eyes, for future use by enthusiasts . . . OR retrieved it from the dumpsters. Much of this information was first desired by "special interest" enthusiasts (i.e., Mustang, Camaro, Firebird, Chevy SS, Pontiac GTO, Corvette). In some cases, specific "hard" numbers were available. In other cases, just "installation percentage" numbers. ALL of this information was once in the files due to the various procurement activities in order to get the cars built. Whether in actual sales orders or individual pieces procured to build the vehicles. As mentioned, possibly the best time to get the data was at the end of the model year desired. Now, in some cases (as Chrysler performance cars, the A-, B-, and E-body cars), some have taken the build numbers to a very tight "science". Hitting some of the main model and equipment specifics to generate "__ of ____" numbers. As possibly 1970 'Cuda 383 with factory a/c, TorqueFlite, specific paint color, specific stripe color, specific interior color and type, etc. On the Chrysler Products, with their "data plate" in plain sight under the hood, it was very easy to document a vehicle without specifically having to take the interior apart looking for Build Sheets. AND, much of this stuff was followed as the vehicles were produced, which helped keep the information "alive". In this, too, was a dedicated man in Chrysler Historical who was a long-time (and known to the gate guards) employee who single-handedly transferred much of the "historical" things into private off-site storage during the times when some in Chrysler wanted to sell anything of potential value and scrapping/selling old parts for "chickenfeed" prices. When the "crisis" was over, he moved it all back and Chrysler Historical came to a new prominence of being able to track things and customer inquiries. There were some similar people in the Buick area of things who actively sought archived files and retrieved them from dumpsters, then got them to a "safe place". This was mostly by pure luck, which might explain some of the gaps in the Sloan's information. Once the "filed" files were found where they were, then further investigations probably led to contacts with the disposing entities so the information could be saved rather than discarded. As iconic as this information might have later become, at the time, it was just numbers to many who made them happen. "Just work", to them. From what I recall, Pontiac was the first to advertise that they had archived information and would respond to inquiries. I also believe that many divisions might answer specific requests with Letters of Authenticity, of sorts. LIke "The Last 1975 Caprice Convertible Build", or how close a particular one was to that "last one", for example. There are some figures for Camaros, which I've seen online or in print, I believe. The referenced Ward's Auto publications can be interesting, but still a little too general for many enthusiasts who are seeking that "One of ____" confirmation of their particular car, for allegedly more value of the vehicle. But you can determine which particular things were more rare than others, in some cases. So, finding this information in a more current time orientation is not universally available for all carlines or manufacturers. The total production of a particular model might be available relatively easily, which can be revealing enough in its own right, but getting much past that can be difficult. Some trending data form one year to the next might be possible, but still speculative and somewhat related to historic events of the particular model year . . . which might be better than "nothing at all". Be cognizant, as well, that "rarity" of option groupings or individual options themselves might be significant if it was their "first/last" year of use, or unique due to a low production level, but that does not always equate into more vehicle value unless a particular buyer might desire that distinction and is willing to pay for owning such. As time progresses, such distinctions can be lost and become more in-important. For example, having one of the first (or only) Reattas with the FACTORY cell phone option (where the phone handset was housed in the center console (pretty neat!) OR a Olds Toronado with the factory multi-color electronic instrument cluster and factory cell phone option/anti-theft system (where if the car was stolen, it'd "call somebody" to alert them of the possible theft (even neater!!), but each of those technologies have now been obsoleted and inoperative (in the case of the cell phone operation!) and could be more problems should they need service. Still very neat, though. "Late in the model year introduction" of particular options would be another area, as the first 3800 Supercharged C/H cars were, with regular option availability in the following model year. Hundreds were produced in that last 120 days of the model year, which were significant back then, but then blended into the regular production ranks of things. And then there were some GM Fleet Colors that were available in the model year before they became regular production items, too. Just some observations, NTX5467
  16. NTX5467

    1957/58 Speedometer adjust?

    Starting sometime in the '60s . . . or somewhere else back then . . . GM started to use "ratio adapters" that were screwed into the cable end at the transmission speedometer cable fitting. This helped "hit the gaps" in the gear ratios of the drive and driven speedometer gears. Sometimes, they would speed-up the cable rpm, sometimes slow it down. This also related to the odometer, too! Many would have been when the driven gears had about 25 teeth on them and the drive gear was about 8 teeth. In the '80s, the number of teeth on the gears seemed to double, but adapters were still needed in many cases. The adapter ratio is stamped on the housing, usually rectangular. When I went to GR70-15 (factory Z/28 size) from the stock FR78-14 size on my '77 Camaro, I discovered that I could just remove the 1.05 ratio adapter and put the speedometer cable direct to the transmission fitting and everything worked just right. Possibly a 2% error? I always checked the odometer calibration and then converted that to mph at 60mph checking speed. ALWAYS check the odometer calibration first, then the elapsed times to cover 10 miles on a flat Interstate (using the mile markers) for the speed function. Odometer is also critical for accurate determination of fuel economy, too. NTX5467
  17. NTX5467

    Texas Road Warriors --- Mile High Blitz

    When you start "scaling the Caprock" north of Post, that might be your trial run for Raton. Y'all enjoy! NTX5467
  18. NTX5467

    New Scheme: second sway bar on a 55

    I understand the issues of failure at the most inopportune time! It would not surprise me if a similar dual-bar set-up was not used in the earlier days of NASCAR when "race tires" were "truck tires". I don't think the bars themselves would be the issue, but the link bolts MIGHT. This is why the arc the ends of the bars make as the wheels move up and down is important and need to be of similar forces to not focus the bulk of the forces in one particular area. The ball-type shapes of the link bolt grommets and the ends of the sway bars can allow for such movements. BUT . . . my '77 Camaro with the 1.25" front Z/28 bar on it has broken link bolts before. I didn't notice it until I saw it when parked and the wheels turned. No real "lean" issues, but then the car is sprung stiffer than a "floating" Buick typically is. I had the polyurethane link bolt grommets on it when that happened. I'll concur that a bigger and stiffer single bar would be the optimum way to do things, BUT in absence of such, "lemonade" happens. NTX5467
  19. NTX5467

    Carburetor: WCFB 2197S idle problems

    Flow meter? Why not look for a race engineering shop that flow benches cylinder heads. Then mock-up an air cleaner base to it. Back in the '80s, a magazine did a mass-test of air filter element flows and then the then-beloved K&N surgical gauze. At that time, the Motorcraft paper filter came up with the best numbers of any paper filter and not that far from the "high-flow" K&N filter element. Seems like there's an Engine Master video of air cleaner housings for power? Found a deal from a Dodge Charger forum of flow tests of about 8 different water pumps for Chrysler B/RB V-8s. Perhaps something of that nature for Buicks? OR . . . at what flow spin-on oil filters start to bypass back to the crankcase? Then position that against filter media size and efficiency at what micron level of foreign objects trapped by the media? NTX5467
  20. NTX5467

    New Scheme: second sway bar on a 55

    Might it be that Quickor is a "part-time" company that is related to a more "full-time" entity that better pays the bills? The other question might be what's unique to the bar stock used to build anti-roll bars that might prevent such things from being built by a larger spring shop with an on-site kiln? Other than configuring the sockets where the link bolt grommets contact. Congratulations on your achievements, Old-Tank! Now, you just need some sticky radials to go play at the local SCCA auto-crosses! NTX5467
  21. NTX5467

    1960 Electra Generator Issues

    As I recall, the light illuminates when voltage is flowing backward in the system (i.e., discharge, not enough power being generated to cover the system's load). Hopefully, you've got it fixed! NTX5467
  22. From the dealership website prior to purchase . . .
  23. Some really NICE Buicks rolling around, making this world a more beautiful place! NTX5467
  24. Took my newer-older Buick out last Saturday. Took it to get a new set of Michelins put on it, replacing the date code "19 08" Sears MIchelin Weatherwise radials. 10 years old! That ONE change made it ride and drive much better! Drove it about 75 miles to get the tires broken-in some. No need to replace the struts/shocks now! A great car for trips! As I got back toward the farm, a new noise/worsened old noise got louder . . . a/c compressor. Now parked back in the new building until I get a new one. When I moved the car, it got quieter, though, but still there. Found it on our used car lot! Started out as a rental car in Hawaii. Sold to its first retail owner and it lived northeast of Abilene, TX pretty much the rest of its life (according to Carfax). Something of an impulse purchase after my 2005 Impala broke it's third flywheel. 2005 LeSabre Limited. 89K miles. Light silver/tan-gold tone leather. Interior looks really NEW, a few minor hickeys on the outside. I found an inch of water in the spare tire well. Later found a lh rr sunroof drain tube that never had been connected to its outside connection! Bought it to replace the 2005 Impala with 180k on it. Later determined to keep the Impala (very low resale, even for the miles) as the Buick is too nice for daily/to work uses. Enjoy! NTX5467
  25. NTX5467

    1957/58 Speedometer adjust?

    Keep forgetting about the GPS use. I just like using a digital watch as that's what I used to use and wear. Easier to "work" than the timer on my flip phone. NTX54567