NTX5467

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Everything posted by NTX5467

  1. NTX5467

    Dynaflow reliability

    Beemon, you should be ashamed of yourself picking on cars with smaller engines, turbos, and gazillion-speed automatics . . . with your BIG Nailhead Buick. Do THEY know how to et their turbos spooled up and how to turn off the traction control? Watch out for those earlier K-car Turbo II Mopars. They came with a 3000rpm stall speed converter, from the factory. Quite surprising! Ask me how I know . . . NTX5467
  2. NTX5467

    Dynaflow reliability

    You have that stiff of a throttle return spring? NTX5467
  3. NTX5467

    Use Of Premium Fuel

    NPR Newshour, tonight, mentioned the lifting of the SUMMERTIME E15 ban. It was mentioned that this summertime ban was put in place due to orientations that the E15 is more volatile (easier to evaporate) and could increase atmospheric ozone as a result. ONLY in the summer months. So, what many have heard, or thought they heard, might not be entirely accurate. There might be some other little details that were not mentioned, too. Have to let things settle down to see what really happens. The performance issues between RFG (ethanol blended fuels, the first version) and E0 were well-documented in the BACK of the Chevron website, in the 1990s, when RFG was in its first uses in CO and a few other places. I was surprised to see a future seller of those fuels make these statements! About hos it would have "increased crank time" and other attributes about it. NTX5467
  4. NTX5467

    Use Of Premium Fuel

    Where on a factory FI vehicle do you have any rubber fuel lines? Other than the braid-covered front flex lines, (if any), it all should be plastic with quick-disconnect connections and rubber seals inside of them. Just curious, NTX5467
  5. NTX5467

    Use Of Premium Fuel

    As I understand it, all rubber fuel line hoses were formulated to resist the affects of the "ReFormulatedFuel" of that earlier-'90s time. This was when ethanol was usually under 5% by volume. I believe that it was first used as "winter oxygenated gas" in the higher altitudes only. To counteract/decrease the atmospheric content of CO2, I believe. The bulk of cars in the total fleet still had carburetors, with only the newer ones with forms of EFI. As things progressed, more EFI cars tended to make the use of oxygenated fuels less important, from what I've heard. BUT, instead of less oxygenated fuels, we got more. Most automotive fuel pump diaphrams are made of a more ethanol-resistant product. As long as it stays "wet" with fuel. From a thread in here several years ago, it was noted that as long as the diaphragm is "wet with fuel", longevity is good. IF the diaphragm ever gets "dry" (as from the vehicle sitting for longer periods of time, with not being started or the fuel in the lines evaporates), THEN the diaphragm material will get brittle. Guess what later happens when the car is put into service again? Mechanical fuel pump leaks/failure. Electric fuel pumps and EFI is not a magic bullet, either. If the EFI/electric fuel pump vehicle sits the same length of time, in vane fuel pumps, the vanes can corrode and seize. Nothing else to do but replace it. EVEN in an OEM EFI system, there IS a bit of rubber. Where? Fuel pressure regulator. From my experience, if the later-model car has very low miles (for its age), that means it has sat a good bit. Which can mean the fuel pressure regulator could also suffer the detriments of ethanol, too. Simple to replace, though. Still, some fuel line seal O-rings in the mix, too. Use ONLY those formulated for the liquid they are sealing! To me, if a carb is calibrated correctly, it can perform nearly as well as an EFI system. Sequential port injection is the best version, but the other versions have their benefits, too. In most cases, we wouldn't have the great all-weather drivability (and reduced exhaust emissions) if it were not for the EFI and related engine electronics that make things work as well as they do. But in order for the EFI to deliver all of its benefits, "driving style" becomes very important, by observation! To me, the evidence of ethanol's ills are really there. Even on many YouTube videos! And anything you see on there will get worse with higher blends as E15! At this point in time, ethanol's use is more related to being a "fuel extender" rather than for any significant impact on environmental quality, I believe. We KNOW that E0 produces about 6% MORE MPG than E10. for example. We know how much mpg decrease can come from E85 use in FlexFuel vehicles, compared to even E10. To me, the pricing of E0, E15, and E85 might be a little suspect. At the local WalMart, E0 is 40cents higher than E10. At the QuikTrip down the street, E85 is about 40cents less expensive than E10. In other DFW Metro QT stations, the newer ones have replaced diesel with E15, which is 7cents less expensive than E10. As for the amount of ethanol in particular fuel blends, that can vary with the brand and time of the year. The ONLY people who might know are those at the fuel terminals that do "splash blending" at the time the fuel tanker is filled. AND they probably just push buttons. In short, there is no really universal recommendation that can be made about modern fuels, other than "use what works for you in your vehicle". As in the '60s, that's pure trial-error! With modern EFI and ethanol, we've probably become somewhat "whatever" about ethanol use. It's everywhere and it seems to work in our newer vehicles (which were better designed to tolerate it!). The affects on older vehicles will not appear until much later, after that batch of E10 is long gone. So we just need to know "the enemy" and seek to minimize any "battle damage" when possible. NTX5467
  6. NTX5467

    Dynaflow reliability

    From what I've observed over the past few decades, when people arbitrarily toss around the word "junk", it's usually because they haven't sought the knowledge or orientations which led to a particular device. No "learning how and why it works, OR why it is that way", apparently. The best part is learning these little quirks and using them to best advantage, from experience. Rather than drivers expecting a vehicle to adjust to THEM, automatically! IF a person is used to a modern 3-speed Simpson Step Gear automatic, not having the same feels in a DynaFlow is "different" to them. But then people drive many CVT Nissans every day. As with the DynaFlows, they have a different feel to them, which is quite nice once you learn how to use it. As with other automatic trans of that time, there probably are a few weak points, but when they fail, most builders knew what caused them, despite what the owners might have claimed. I believe that DynaFlows did have design/performance improvements with almost every early model year, which was also common with other automatics back then, too. The other thing is that traffic patterns are much faster than in prior times. Even from when 3-speed automatics were in everything. Now almost all automatics have a geared 4.50 low gear ratio (6+speed automatics). Combine that with the torque converter multiplication and "Launch" is much better than the earlier 4-speed automatics with their 2.75-3.06 low gear ratios. In those respects, the DynaFlow is an antiquity, but then is the Chevy PowerGlide (which is the basis for many top fuel drag racers). While I have no first-hand experiences with DynaFlows, I'll suspect that if you drive them as they were designed to be driven, they'll be as reliable as anything else back then. Which Old-Tank tends to confirm. Heat is the "death" of automatic transmissions (and their fluid!), so regular ATF changes are as important as with modern automatics. Getting "old gaskets" to seal with modern sealer applications can be done, too. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  7. NTX5467

    Use Of Premium Fuel

    In "the old Research Octane" ratings, in 1957, "Ethyl" was 97 Research Octane rating, typically. That would mean that some "premiums" might have been 95 Research Octane as others maxed-out at 97. By about 1960, "Premium" was closer to 100 Research Octane. What's on the pumps is "Pump Octane", which is the average of Research Octane and Motor Octane. The Motor method generates lower octane numbers, with Research being higher numbers . . . for the same fuel being tested. Typically, you can add "4" to the Pump Octane to approximate Research Octane. Ethyl was 97-100 Research Octane. Regular was usually 94-95 Research Octane Sub-Regular was more like 91 Research Octane. All before "Low-Lead" came out. Taking the lead out usually resulted in Research Octane of about "2" less than fully-leaded fuel. In 1974, Premium was 94-95.5 Pump Octane. Regular was 91-92 Pump Octane (later termed "Mid-Grade" by some). Sub-Regular was 89 Pump Octane. Decrease these low-lead numbers by "2" and you tend to get what we have now. 87/89/91-93, "Regular", "Mid-Grade", "Premium", respectively. Higher elevations means less effective cylinder pressure (thinner atmosphere), so less octane is needed. In general, just like in prior times, it's a "Try and see" situation. Many current octane boosters usually have some sort of alcohol/ethanol in them to raise the fuel's octane a few numbers. Best to fine the fuel that works best and use it! If clattering persists, then something like Berryman's B-12 in the gas tank prior to a "two-tank" length trip might work best in getting the combustion chambers cleaned out of carbon deposits. NOTHING works instantly, as many imply. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  8. NTX5467

    Inside Buick Magazine

    Perhaps, they mean they don't sell the ONE copy they might have, but do sell duplicates? Or sell a copy (done locally) of that original item? www.RegalGS.org might be of interest to you, but I suspect it's more oriented toward the later 90s Regals. When I first saw the Xp2000 concept car in 1995,, the later Regals seemed to mimic that styling, although I just discovered it was really a Holden VT Commodore platform. In your search, you might look for the 1989 Buick Regal Press Kit. This is the full GM/Buick publicity information sent to newspapers for publication on the new models. By observation, some of those kits include pictures and related articles which were seldom seen anywhere else. NTX5467
  9. NTX5467

    Opinions Sought on Delco-Rebuilt Carburetor

    "Know how to work on", from prior experiences. Once done, no issues for 100K+ miles, typically. Even on the Holley 4bbls. "Your experiences might vary". NTX5467
  10. NTX5467

    Opinions Sought on Delco-Rebuilt Carburetor

    I'll admit that the few times I had any dealings with the internal-piston choke pull-off, it was in about 1968 as I was trying to help my Band Director get his '52 Chevy to run better. The whole linkage stuff looked flimsy to me. But, as Jon mentioned, there were probably other things involved that I had no knowledge of, in getting the vacuum to the piston to make it all work as designed. To me, the external pull-offs were a much better arrangement. From what I've seen on the automatic chokes on the care I own, few were calibrated (to factory specs) in a manner that resulted in their best performance, for how I drive AND our climate. I usually ended up re-bending the external links to the choke linkage, re-setting the fast idle speed screw, and (usually) leaning out the choke thermostat setting (a notch or two). End result was that even in 30 degree F weather, the engine was at close to "base idle" in about two miles of driving. No need to let it run, just drive it easy once it starts and runs. ONE part of this strategy was the NGK V-Power plugs I came to use. That particular electrode design puts the spark out to the edge of the ground electrode, for more exposure to the air/fuel mix. Once my Camaro would fire off, cold, I'd put it in reverse to back out of the driveway. If is acted like it would falter, a short at on the accel pedal to get a quick pump shot from the OEM-spec 9895 Holley 4175 was all it would take to keep it running. By the time I got to the 2nd stop sign from the house, it usually was on base idle, running reliably. Without a "snorkel" air cleaner. When the Camaro was new, it had the stock 2bbl on it. Sometimes, it wouldn't come off of the top fast idle notch, even with the windows steaming from the defroster. I'd have to put it in gear and turn the ignition off. THEN it would release. Never did figure that one out. On those middle-70s years, the carb choke got its heat assist from a tube which was in the center heat crossover passage in the intake manifold. A neat and easy to access system! But it also required a piece of special high-heat silicone vacuum line to get the heat from the crossover tube into the choke coil area. Normal hose would melt! When I upgraded to a 4bbl intake with an electric choke, I got the Holley Thermister. It was supposed to vary the amount of juice to the electric choke by engine temp. Didn't work for some reason. I spliced into the brown wire from the alternator, which later entered into the harness "+" system. Tried to run it via a 3-prong oil pressure switch, but that didn't work, either. So I just used a normal hot lead, of sorts. Then tweaked it until it worked like I wanted it to. To me, the Rochester 2bbl is one of the most bullet-proof carbs ever produced -- period. It just works and stays working for a long time. There were some emission tweaks in the '70s models, in some cases, and also several 1.69" throttle bore versions, too. One of the best stock-running Chevy 350s I drove (a friend's '70 ElCamino) had that larger version on it. For many people, it runs as good as a QJet 4bbl 350, on a stock engine. Be that as it may. And then there were the 1.44" throttle bore models that were on many Buick small V-8s. Very good off-idle throttle response, being basically the same size as the primary side of a QJet. So for most drivers, runs at least as good as QJet 4bbl, but without the "top end rush" power. To be sure, a normal Buick 350 QJet engine will run and feel better than a similar small block Chevy 4bbl, by observation. As I've progressed in age, as have the cars I own, the number of service techs that know what they're looking at has decreased. This is one reason I made that "later model carb" suggestion I did. Plus what I consider a more modern way of doing things with the automatic chokes. Thanks for the updates on the choke pull-offs, too, Jon! Another reason I tend to gravitate toward recent-production carbs rather than used, OEM-spec carbs of questionable internal condition. Just my preference, for what it's worth. I commend Ben on his progress with his EFI system on his Straight 8 Buick. As I recall, it's increased both highway fuel economy plus basic drivability, which it should, in theory. The newer self-learning EFIs, too, require a compatible distributor input, typically, in addition to just the EFI kit itself. I do feel that they can improve many operational parameters, BUT much of their improvement can also relate to how "out of whack" the factory calibration might have been in the first place. Especially if a more efficient intake manifold compliments the installation. In the mean time, I'll stick with the carbs I know how to work on. As time progresses, too, there will be more self-learning EFI kits for more engines. The recent Holley Sniper kit for a Carter BBD 2bbl Jeep application is one such item. With good fuel tank baffling, the EFI will allow the vehicle to get into even MORE challenging terrain, I suspect. But it can also be added to other small V-8s where the small BBD was used, possibly with some fuel curve tweaking for the 5.2L V-8s. AND, the price will decrease as time goes on, too! But with new Holley 4175s now being near $500.00, in comparison, that $1000.00+ price of a self-learning EFI becomes more reasonable, for many. What Ben used is an OEM-based TBI system, with a "custom chip" for his application. Similar in concept to the many ScareBird item upgrades, but for EFI and instructions, from a different place. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  11. NTX5467

    Opinions Sought on Delco-Rebuilt Carburetor

    In further thinking about your carb . . . IF I was going to change it, I'd look more toward a reman unit from a '70 Buick 350 2bbl V-8. I believe that one is probably the same 1.44" throttle bores as I suspect you carb is, PLUS it would have an external vacuum choke pull-off. Metering might be a hair leaner with the later model, but not by a great amount, I suspect. I've dealt with those internal choke pull-offs and have not had very good luck with them, for one reason or another. There might be some issues adapting/cross-breeding the choke thermostat between the earlier and later models, possibly. As for EFI, Holley just released a Sniper 2bbl FI unit. It's purpose is to replace the Carter BBD 2bbls on Jeeps. Jeeps which go into terrain rougher than I'd ever want to be in, but some want to drive in it. The EFI is a bolt-on unit, to replace the "small" Carter BBD 2bbl, which I suspect is the same baseplate bolt pattern as your Rochester probably is. Still past $1K by the time it's running on the engine, though. I believe your intake manifold might have the "heat track" in front of the throttle bores? That might need the correct metal gasket (as the 4bbl version does) to keep the exhaust from leaking around a more recent gasket. Just mentioning this as a possibility. I'm not sure, off hand, if it's there on your manifold or not. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  12. NTX5467

    ID this steering wheel?

    Are the black areas squishy soft or hard plastic? What diameter? Thanks, NTX5467
  13. NTX5467

    Opinions Sought on Delco-Rebuilt Carburetor

    I'm not sure who "Autoline" is, but I've seen some decent reviews in other forums. Doesn't mean it "as good as new", though, to me. Depending upon the rebuilder, the quality of the items used in the rebuild can be variable in quality and durability. AND at a price that can allow the auto supply chains to make a good profit on them. How is your existing rebuilt carb "messed up"? Just curious. For any rebuilt carb that's been on a shelf for many years, it might work when installed and it might not. As mentioned, it could have some issues when it's been exposed to current ethanol-blend fuels, too. So it can be a "crap shoot", of sorts. Ben makes a good point about modern fuels and how they get into the engine. Only thing is that a higher expense is involved, parts and LABOR, that might not be financially-returned in fuel savings alone, IF that matters. The other side of things is that when the Rochester 2bbls from the '60s and earlier '70s are "to spec", they are bulletproof in drivability and durability. When we first got RFG in TX, I was driving an inherited '70 Skylark Custom 350 2bbl V-8. I could document a 3% fuel economy decrease, as Chevron had stated on their website, in a section buried deep in the back of their website, devoted to ReFormulatedGas, at the time. No performance issues, so I'd suspect nothing major with E10, personally. In getting one of the older carbs rebuilt, you do NOT want a NewOldStock carb kit! You want one that's more recent, to which you'll probably need a thick carb baseplate insulator gasket. Adjust the idle just as you used to, get a new choke coil, or adjust the older one 1-2 notches "lean", as they get tighter with age. Then do a tune-up on the ignition items. That should put you in a place that should be "good" for about 10-15K miles down the road. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  14. NTX5467

    Inside Buick Magazine

    My suspicion is that the particular magazine, like other manufacturer brand-specific magazines, were sent to new car customers, who'd purchased new Buicks, by a vendor that contracts with the OEM and the dealership to make that happen. At a cost to the particular dealership, whose identification is on the magazine's cover, AND at the dealerships discretion. The Sloan Museum is a research facility, NOT a retail sales facility for their archived items. Might I respectfully inquire as to your desire to own these particular issues of the magazine? Just curious. Take care, NTX5467
  15. NTX5467

    1955 motor swap

    Sent PM
  16. NTX5467

    1955 motor swap

    There have been many changes in the 3.6L from its first introduction. A cam phaser failure, which was finally tracked back to a poorly-installed paper gasket for the cam phasers' attachment to the engine, but it trashed the heads when it failed. Of course, that was then and no related issues in that areas since then. I know that we kept a LOT of heads and the stuff to build them completely in stock, for months, before GM finally decided to ship us assembled heads instead. Then it went down to that one gasket/seal. The 3.6L in the current Camaros is the 2nd Gen version, that was allegedly completely re-engineered. Still if one fails, still a few days out for the parts for the repair, which is my point. Whether new or old, if a failure results, you're going to either be "on the back of a wrecker" or "in a motel for a few nights". We know that the relative aerodynamics of a mid-'50s Buick is not the same as that of a current Camaro. That 30mpg EPA could easily drop to mid-20s in the older Buick, which is getting close to what I suspect a Buick 350, THM200-4R/THM700 trans, with self-learning EFI might achieve under similar cruise conditions. MANY things go into that mpg for the Camaro, too, which would require a bit of doing to duplicate on the Buick. Be that as it may . . . IF you're going to use almost any late model SOHC/DOHC V-8 or V-6, you will also need the later model automatics with the 4.50- low gear (6L90E or similar 8-speed automatic) as so many of the later engines have somewhat weak off-idle torque, up to about 2000rpm or so. That initial low gear gets them through that lower rpm range quickly, with the tightly-spaced upper gears keeps the engine rpm low during mild acceleration or going up hills . . . as if they don't have enough torque to pull them without a downshift, by observation. By comparison the GM LS late-model pickups with the 8-speed work flawlessly with very little throttle input. Much more off-idle torque and fewer downshifts on the road at 70mph, by observation, plus I've averaged 20mpg plus on several of them, in my normal freeway-centric driving with the cruise control. Which is probably ONE reason they can be so popular with the street machine people. By the same token, I ran many tanks of fuel through our '87 Silverado 5.7L V-8. 3.08 rear axle, P235/75R-15 radials, THM700 automatic, and 2bbl TBI pickup. Keeping cruising speed to 55-60mph, when the national speed limit was 55mph, which yielded similar 20mpg results. That was driving it like a carb, using the "slow and gentle" accelerations. Now that I know how to drive a EFI vehicle better, I might get even better results? In a somewhat blocky vehicle. Therefore, I stand by my Buick 350/OD automatic orientation as an upgrade from an earlier Nailhead. Not that a better-optimized Nailhead and a THM200-4R might not be such a bad deal either! NTX5467
  17. NTX5467

    1955 motor swap

    The problem with using something as Beemon mentions . . . would be finding a controller to run just the engine, rather than engine/trans/etc. GM Perf Parts has a stand-alone transmission controller for their "Street Rod" plug-n-play, with a 4L80E (I believe) transmission, which was over $2K the last I looked. Using something like the 3.6L DOHC High Feature V-6 might be neat, but there are LOTS of moving parts in that engine. The great fuel economy they can get on the highway depends upon ALL of the vehicle systems and sensors working together, many of which would not be needed on a street rod/street machine application. Not to mention the phenomenally good aerodynamics of the modern vehicles. BUT, if you have some trouble in a remote town, just because it's a current OEM engine doesn't mean a dealer will have parts on the shelf for it. They might still be one or two days "out", depending upon the stocking warehouse location. AND, they aren't "cheap to fix", either. More reality issues, to me. Nothing's impossible with enough time and money, it's just that danged cost-benefit analysis "thing" that might get in the way for some (including ME). Old-Tank has successfully proven that driving and enjoying his '55 Buicks is very possible in modern times. It can take a bit more work to a higher level of execution, but it CAN be done with a stock-spec Buick. Check out his Buick Restorers Internet presence. Enjoy! NTX5467
  18. NTX5467

    1955 motor swap

    No offense taken, at least for me. Just wanted to point out that the 455, although "modern", is still at least 40 years old at this time. Last year produced was '76. Which, plus the non-volume of parts requests for one at the auto supply stores, is not that much better than with your existing motor. The THM400, although "modern", was last used in about the late '80s, living on in 4L80E form for many years later. So, the "modern stuff" mentioned isn't all that "current" when you look at what's on the shelves at most auto supply stores. Even IF you found some parts in stock, it would mean they'd have been on the shelves for decades. To me, those are reality issues. No more, no less. While many who come into these forums are more concerned with keeping things as they were built, which I understand, myself and others also appreciate your desires "while on a trip", too. You might find a more receptive group for what you are considering in the "Modified" Forum, a few notches down the Buick AACA Forums list. I know that everybody tends to gravitate toward the "big motors", but for a normal car upgrade, a Buick 350 V-8 and a THM350 or THM200-4R or THM700 automatic would probably make more $$$$ and sense, in the long run. Not hard to put a HEI distributor in one that didn't come with it. Your choice of carburetor (2bbl or 4bbl)r or after-market self-learning EFI, too. Notice that I said "BUICK" 350, which is a totally different breed of Skyhawk than a Chevy 350! The transmission bell housing bolt patterns will need to match the BUICK or B-O-P bolt pattern, too. When it was new, the Buick Nailhead had many advanced design features, which made it a better motor than the beloved small block Chevy, but it also had a few things that made it a little less desirable at the same time. The cylinder heads, in particular, had to have enough narrowness for the exhaust manifolds to clear the chassis, for example. This necessitated the smaller valves and ports, which also had higher velocity for more torque in the mid-range, but limited ultimate top end horsepower. A torque motor, which the DynaFlow needed. The small block Chevy, being a physically smaller motor, was more prone to be able to be put "everywhere", by comparison, and had much better rpm and power output. Plus being lighter than the straight-6 it replaced! The middle'50s cars were still generally using body/chassis architecture which originated when the engines were all "inline", rather than V-shaped. This tends to explain the head-width issues I mentioned PLUS why the Chrysler Hemis had exhaust manifolds which had to hug the block before they attached to their under-car exhaust systems. Other than the issues of rear suspension, drive shaft, and such with any engine/trans swap, you'll need to have a good shop build the engine mounts to put the newer engine in your car. THAT can be expensive, just by itself. It's not a really "drop-in" situation, even for a Buick 455, although a 425 might be easier. As you and your car are still in the "getting acquainted" stage of things, do that FIRST before you consider doing anything to it. If it's been sitting a good while, there are some things (fuel line hoses and other related rubber items) which will need to be replaced with current-type rubber first. Plus other general "tune-up" items. Fluids, filters, and such, too. Learn about the car and what makes it what it is and why it's that way. There are MANY things to appreciate and learn about why it's one of GM's best products for its build time. Get it to the point that you'd feel safe in driving it long distances, too. This might take a year or two, possibly. Then start considering what might make it better. DynaFlows are allegedly supposed to leak oil, just like Harleys, it seems. BUT gasket technology and sealers have come a very long way since back then. There are a few techniques to keep the torque ball seal from leaking, too. So "leaks of old" can now be dealt with. Even some who claim "they all leak" or "they're supposed to leak" don't like getting a "Most Drips Award" at some car shows! Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  19. NTX5467

    1955 motor swap

    iRather than ask "the kid at ___________" about parts for your car, go to the auto supply's website and put in the same information. Be it O'Reilly's, AutoZone, etc. Then check www.rockauto.com and see what they have in their listings for whatever you're wondering about. As for that "cross country trip", there's always "Express Shipping", which might allow for a day or so of seeing the "local sights" where ever you might end up. For the money you'll spend on your upgrades, you might well end up in the same situation with a Buick 455. Save the money and invest in a few "trunk box parts" to make sure they are correct BEFORE you leave. OR wait to see what you might end up needing and pay the express shipping to where you're at. Cheaper than the upgrades you mentioned. Just some thoughts, NTX5467
  20. NTX5467

    CARBURETOR PARTS

    Howdy -- In looking for some carburetor "things", in another forum, I happened upon what might be a good source of information and carb parts. www.walkerproducts.com/wp-content/catalogs/carburetor/vy-model/carter.pdf When downloaded, it starts with the AFB/AVS models. LIstings of general applications for each carb type. An illustrations like would be in a carb kit, then "parts" for the carb in question, WITH illustrations of same. Goes back into the earlier Carter 1bbls, 2bbls, and 4bbls I've only read of, not seen before. Going back to the main www.walkerproducts.com website, it was obvious they had parts for carbs other than just Carters! Very Interesting! ONLY thing is that in the illustrations, they do have their part numbers for each item, BUT no mention of the specific application of the item. So you'll have to match what you need, visually, rather than havine a catalog application for each item illustrated. Enjoy! NTX5467
  21. NTX5467

    Turnsignal wiring 1964 Buick Wildcat

    Never a good idea to let the wheel spring upward when the tilt lever is pulled! Deploy the lever with one hand on the wheel to control it's movement. EVEN on the '70s columns, too! The only thing to limit the movement are metallic pot metal items, no rubber bumpers. The internal spring is quite strong. Eventually, something deforms and later breaks. Treat them "nicely"! NTX5467
  22. NTX5467

    1964 Buick Rear Control Arm Bushing

    When you do get the replacement items, use only "just snug" when you put it all together. Then do the final torque with the car sitting on the ground, after possibly a few bounces to ensure there is no residual "tension" on the rubber. THEN do the final torque of the fasteners. This keeps the rubber in a more neutral position, rather than being pre-loaded/twisted as the car sits on the ground, making things last longer. Do this with ANY suspension-related rubber bushing/insulator which twists as one of its normal function. NTX5467
  23. NTX5467

    Wanted...1979 Park Ave mirror

    There might possibly be some "model year range" in that mirror's use. Earlier ones might not have the convex feature, though, but later ones probably would. NTX5467
  24. NTX5467

    2004R to nailhead adaptor

    Check out the Riviera Forum for information on swapping a THM200-4R into '60s Rivieras. I believe there are several threads on that from several years ago. NTX5467
  25. NTX5467

    700R4 to nailhead hookup

    Check out the Riviera Forum for use of THM200-4R automatics. That trans, when beefed-up, has seemed to become the darling of the street rod/muscle car people. Takes less power to run than the THM700, bur has a little more reasonable low gear ratio, so not quite so big of a gap between 1st and 2nd, ratio-wise. Plus, as you'll probably discover, it's been done lots of times in the '60s' Rivs. NTX5467