Mike Macartney

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About Mike Macartney

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    Norfolk, England

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  1. Mike Macartney

    1952 MG TD

    Jeff, below is the link to the UK, Europe, site for Caswell. I have emailed them to ask when they will have the blue chromate back in stock. We will see what happens. I maybe wrong about the banning of it in Europe, I have been known to be wrong before! https://www.caswelleurope.co.uk/blue-chromate-500ml/ I'll have to put plating on the back burner for the time being as I really need to get on with the body work repairs on the Humberette, but thank you for all your useful information. Mike
  2. Mike Macartney

    1952 MG TD

    Jeff, Many thanks for the information and links. It seems to be a good method to plate and protect small 'bright' parts. I looked at both the links. When I looked at the Caswell site it said 'out of stock'. Looking into other sources for the blue chromate it looks as if may have been banned from use in Europe - bloody EU unelected autocrat's seem to spoil most peoples fun! I'll keep looking, and dig out my nickel plating kit, which I haven't used for a couple of years, maybe more, and see what extra bits I need to have a go at zinc plating. Mike
  3. Mike Macartney

    1952 MG TD

    Sorry, I should have noticed that the second photo was of the bolts plated. I quickly looked and thought they had just been cleaned up. I'll look up plating kits on the web and see what's on offer. What is the blue chromate, that's a new one to me?
  4. Mike Macartney

    1952 MG TD

    I am very glad to hear that you enjoyed the 'Old Engine Oil' beer. You can buy hexagon bar in various sizes that makes making bolts and nuts a lot easier than making them out of round bar. You did really well with filing the flats on the bolt. I would be Interested to see photos of your zinc plated parts. I have only ever used nickel plating on, vintage and veteran motorcycle parts, that I have restored in the past. I have found with nickel plating It always seems to be a bit of a lottery whether or not the part will turn out OK. I knew that Frost did other types of plating kits but as the kits are expensive I have never tried any of the other types of plating. Mike
  5. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    David, Pleased to hear that you are enjoying the restoration reports. I must admit I have never come across wooden tooth picks, but it sounds like they would do the job. I have been sharpening the match stick ends, if the hole to fill is smaller than the match end, that seemed to work OK. I sawed off the 'sticky out' bits of the match sticks this morning and it looks as if they have done the job and filled the holes OK. Thinking about it, I suppose wooden cocktail sticks may do the same job as tooth picks?
  6. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    On the bottom corners of the door, one of the previous owners has added an aluminium moulding. I think his measuring techniques left a little to be desired! The message here is measure twice cut once. I will see if the gap can be filled by TIG welding. It may need some thin aluminium behind to help the welding process. If all else fails I can Araldite a small section of aluminium into the gap. That is one of the good things about writing these reports, it makes you look at the photos and think of different ways of carrying out some jobs. To be honest, I hadn't thought about Araldite'ing some metal into the gap until just now! This morning has been all about sanding the epoxy primer and filling the grain in the wood that was not completely filled by the epoxy primer. This photo is to help people who maybe using filler for the first time. You don't need a lot of hardener. If you put in too much hardener the filler goes off to quickly and you end up wasting a lot of filler. Mix the two components together until the coloured streaks have all disappeared. Use a wide as possible filler spreader if you are filling a large area, as I am having to do. I just use the black plastic spreader in the photo to mix the filler and then to put it onto the area I am going to fill. I use a stainless steel spreader to scrape the filler across the imperfections. Once the filler starts to 'pudding', stop trying to spread the filler it as it will only pick up filler from the area you have just filled. I know it's just happened to me! Before the filler has gone off, scrape most of the filler off the spreaders by scraping one against the other. When the majority of filler has been scraped off the spreaders. I clean them in a container of thinners that I keep for cleaning brushes and things like these spreaders. It is an old Tupperware pot with a lid that seals the thinners in the pot and stops it evaporating. After wiping dry with a cloth the spreaders are all ready to start the filing process all over again. After a morning of filling, I was starting to get rather bored, and looked around for another job that might keep me amused for a bit. I noticed that under the side of the body there was a section of wood that still had screw holes in it. I sharpened up some matches to fit into the holes. Removed the matches one by one, coated them in wood glue and tapped then into place. I will let glue harden overnight and then cut the ends off. I found that with the matchsticks you needed to hold then straight with one hand and tap them in with a hammer in the other hand. If you don't they tend to break as you can see in the above photo. I was trying to take a photo of tapping the matchsticks in with my left hand while tapping with my right hand. It didn't work! There was still a bit more time left before I decided to pack up for the day, so I did a bit more polishing on the switches and brass plates. It was getting to a point with the filling that it was difficult to see the areas that needed a bit more filling. I decided to spray a very thin coat of satin black using an aerosol. Hopefully, tomorrow when I sand down the filler it will show me the low areas that need some more filler. Once I am happy with the finish of the filled wooden parts of the body I will give the wooden parts another coat of the epoxy primer. I'll now pack up for the day and leave the filler to go hard and have another sand down and fill tomorrow.
  7. Mike Macartney

    Kissel 1918 Sedanette

    Ron, Many thanks for the information and advice on the tires. Mike
  8. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    This method of holding the brass plate on a board seemed to work well. It's difficult at this stage to see if it looks OK and not too 'naff' until the fuel tank and dashboard are painted. I am still undecided whether or not to paint the tank the colour of the car (blue) or satin black. I can decide later. George, a fellow Humberette owner in the UK, who I found via the Humber Register, kindly has sent me a template of the curve on his top bows. (we call them hood sticks). As we are going to attempt to steam bend the top bows I made a former to bend them around with some 3/4" plywood. As they need to be roughly 1" x 1-1/2" I made 3 plywood curves and screwed them to together to make the former. This block will eventually be screwed to a board on which we will form the top bows. When screwed onto the board the other way round it will form the bend on the right hand side of the car. I have now given the 'block' to Robert to clean up the curve on his linisher. Looking ahead to when the top (hood) is made the fixings will need to be on the beading that is screwed onto the top edge of the sheet metal. 'Sod's Law' being what it is. It is likely if I don't mark where the existing screws are, I will be attempting to screw the hood fixings into the existing screw heads! I thought it wise to take some photos of the sides and back and mark the positions of the existing screws in my Humberette note book for future reference when the body is painted and the screw holes are not visible anymore. I shall also past this photo into the book as well as the photo of the back and the other side. On the door at the top is a half inch wide moulding. Around the rest of the car is a 3/4" wide moulding. I decided to remove this 1/2" mounding and replace it with 3/4" to match the rest of the car. I cleaned the rust off that was under the moulding with a mule skinner. I carefully curved the inside top of the vertical mouldings to accept the new 3/4" moulding. And the moulding was drilled on the pillar drill and screwed into position and painted with etching primer.
  9. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    Ray, Thanks for the link showing the old Humber works. That maybe why the early veteran Humberette's stopped in, I think 1906, and Humber reused the name with their Humberette cyclecar in 1913. Mike
  10. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    I have just been looking through my reports and filing away the photos I have used in a separate file to try and avoid confusion by using some photos twice. I have found a few that are worth reporting on. This is the glue I haven using to glue the wooden plugs into the redundant holes and screw holes. In the holes I used a good coating of glue on a short length of welding rod to coat the sides of the hole. The plugs were also coated with the glue before carefully tapping in with a hammer. For mounting the side mounting brackets for the windscreen (windshield) support and acetylene front lamps, I used domed stainless pan headed slotted screws, turned down the heads to a suitable size. I then countersunk the brass support holes so that the domes were flush with the outside of the brass supports. This shows the original size before machining and the final head size. All these parts will finally be sprayed the blue colour of the car. I think they will look a bit better than the hex head bolts that the previous owner had fitted. They just didn't look right, although they may have been hex head bolts originally, I don't know. Although there is virtually no nickel plating left of these brass acetylene headlamps I think they were originally nickel plated. I think I am going to polish the brass above the areas where the masking tape is as it may look a bit strange with the support being blue above the masking tape, Your thoughts would be appreciated. I believe these supports were originally painted the colour of the body, but I am not 100% sure. Looking at photographs of other Humberette's they all seem to be different! You have probably seen enough of the wooden plugs by now, but just in case here is another photo! Now here is something rather different and maybe controversial?! I don't particularly like the cut outs either side of the petrol tank on the dashboard. Also I need to put a couple of switches onto the dash for the lighting and ignition. I am going to replace the burners inside the acetylene lamps with LED bulbs. To this end I thought I would make some brass plates to cover the cut outs and mount period brass and porcelain switches on the plates. The photo shows my drawing and the old bit of brass that I had. These are the switches I have. The photo shows them with the brass cover removed. I have marked the fixing hole positions on the brass plate. This shows the drawing and the switch before I have polished the switch. Holes drilled in the brass plate for the cables and the switch fixings. The first plate drilled and cut out with a 1mm cutting disc fitted into the 4.5" angle grinder. I surprised myself how well it cut out without any hard work with filing. Now to see how it polishes up. I screwed it to a bit of wood to make it easier to hold before I pushed the plate against the polishing mop. Used up my 9.77MB so you will have to wait and see how I got on in the next post.
  11. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    Hi Ray, I believe that the 1913 to 1915 Humberette's were made in Coventry.
  12. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    I prefer to repair items, if possible, rather than replace them to keep the vehicle as close to original as possible. A number of UK cars, up to the 1930's, had gravity petrol tanks, normally behind the dashboard with the filler in the scuttle panel. I must admit that this is the first car I have come across with the petrol (gasoline) tank going through the dashboard and through the bulkhead with the fillers in the cockpit. The slots in the dashboard on the left and the right (you can't see the righthand slot in the above photo) are so that the two mounting brackets that bolt the other end of the tank to the bulkhead will pass through the dash. The original chassis number plate (VIN number) hides the left hand slot. Unfortunately the last owner put the plate away somewhere for safe keeping and his son, to date, has not been able to find it. I hope he will eventually find it and send it on to me!
  13. Mike Macartney

    Kissel 1918 Sedanette

    I have being following your restoration on this Kissel with interest. The work you are doing is fantastic. I have one question. The tires I see are the same tread pattern as on my 1903 Crestmobile. Where are they available from? Mike
  14. Mike Macartney

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    My first thing to do this morning was to finish masking up the metalwork and other parts that I did not want to spray with the epoxy primer. The brown masking paper that I had on a roll I had knocking about for years. So long that I can't remember when I bought it. I found it upstairs in my old office. The problem that I had with it was it had got very dry, cracked and tears very easily when I tried to form it around shapes. In the end I gave up and finished off with newspaper, which is not ideal. In the background of this photo, leaning against the door is the 'lump' of ash that a friend with a collection of MG's in the garage gave me to cut a bit off for repairs. Robert didn't use it as it was such a useful bit of timber. I put it in the van before I started spraying so that I did not get overspray on it. We used some tongue and groove boarding for a couple of replacement panels for the boot (trunk) floor. Note at the top of the photo the worst bit of woodwork on the body. After spraying the epoxy primer I will attempt to fill this to get this area smooth. I have enough epoxy primer to give this area another coating after filling. Having not done any paint spraying for such a long time is why I was apprehensive. I needn't have worried. It all went quite smoothly. I sprayed the trunk lid first and found that the paint was a bit thick for spraying. After adding a bit more thinners to the 2 pack epoxy it flowed a lot better. I was careful to use my air fed mask, white disposable coverall overalls and gloves. After many years of being involved with vehicle accident repairs and BMW 02/CS restoration work I have got sensitised to isocyanate and my lung age, I am told by the doctor, is 136! I don't know where they find these 136 years to test?!? It's not a Halloween ghost in the background. I covered up as much as I could in the garage to protect it from overspray. This front bulkhead will also need some filling. The hole in the middle is for the gas (petrol) and combined oil tank. The epoxy coated the trunk lid well. The wood on this was the flattest of the lot, or maybe I was wrong to thin the paint a little bit more when I sprayed the rest of the car. I shall never know!
  15. Mike Macartney

    My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

    Manifold looks good. I like the expanding mandrel and have never seen a centre finding tool like the one you are using in the photo. Very clever.