Bill Stewart

Members
  • Content count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About Bill Stewart

  • Rank
    Member
  1. 1936-320 pushrod

    One of the pushrods in my 36 Roadmaster is different than the others! Length is the same but diameter of lower "ball" where it rides in the lifter is larger. Apparently it's been working ok but I sure don't want to put it together that way. The part number for 1936 pushrods is different than all following years and I have not found any for 1936. Can anybody help?
  2. 1936 Roadmaster firewall color

    i read somewhere (can't find it now) that 1936 firewall color should be black, not the body color. Can anybody confirm that?
  3. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Ben, I was only able to run my engine for a few minutes (and wouldnt have done it at all if i'd known what it looked like inside) but timing did not seem too advanced. The carb is a typical downdraft Stromberg.
  4. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Robin, thank you. Now I'm trying to confirm that 38 pistons will also work in my 1936 320. Anybody know for sure?
  5. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan thank you for your ideas. I've had computer hassles so haven't been able to respond. I don't know why only some pistons (#1,2,7,8) were damaged. All eight come up almost exactly flush with the top of the block. A tiny amount of carbon buildup could then cause the pistons to hit the head. At any rate, I don't think it makes sense to risk using that head. The block needs to be bored and i am having difficulty finding 36 pistons. 1938 pistons are everywhere in various sizes so I think it seems sensible to use a 38 head and pistons if that does not introduce other complications. I note that exhaust manifold part numbers are the same for 36, 37, and 38 but intake manifolds have different numbers. Anyone know what the differences are? I have a Stromberg carb. There were no chunks in the oil pan. Apparently all pieces went out the exhaust valves!
  6. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan thank you for your ideas. I've had computer hassles so haven't been able to respond. I don't know why only some pistons (#1,2,7,8) were damaged. All eight come up almost exactly flush with the top of the block. A tiny amount of carbon buildup could then cause the pistons to hit the head. At any rate, I don't think it makes sense to risk using that head. The block needs to be bored and i am having difficulty finding 36 pistons. 1938 pistons are everywhere in various sizes so I think it seems sensible to use a 38 head and pistons if that does not introduce other complications. I note that exhaust manifold part numbers are the same for 36, 37, and 38 but intake manifolds have different numbers. Anyone know what the differences are? I have a Stromberg carb. There were no chunks in the oil pan. Apparently all pieces went out the exhaust valves!
  7. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan, Piston damage on both pistons (and two others} all where piston comes up under spark plug. That flat area is on the same level as the rest of the head surface as though its been machined. Additional damage in other places is probably from broken rings or piston parts banging around in there. No compression ring pieces from the really awful piston were still in the engine when the head was taken off. So----did someone take way too much off the head? I'd like to know what a head looks like that has not been altered. I'm getting used to the idea that i will probably be getting a different head. I can hardly imagine that the pistons are too tall. Surprisingly, cylinder walls are great and rod bearings are between .0015 and .002
  8. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    You sure are right. I'm having trouble dealing with pictures on my computer. When i figure it out I'll do that right away. Thanks.
  9. 1936 Roadmaster firewall

    Somewhere I read that the correct color for the engine area including firewall on the 36 is black, not the body color. True?
  10. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Thanks. The combustion volume (shape) of your head is quite different than mine. Yours does not have the "bulge" below the spark plug that that intrudes into the combustion chamber. That bulge appears to be partly machined away on my head resulting in a flat crescent shaped area in the same plane as the surface of the head----and gets hit by the piston. Kind of hard to describe----I hope that's understandable. I sure would like to see a picture of the underside of an unaltered 1936 320 cu. in. head.
  11. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    I'm quite sure the proper pistons were installed, but its obvious they travel too far. The area they hit below the plugs is a flat crescent shaped surface flush with the rest of the head, as though it was originally raised but has been machined flat along with the rest of the head. It looks like it could have originally been rounded. I can hardly believe that so much might have been taken off the head. Maybe someone could provide a picture of an unmolested head showing that area? I do have access to another head but it is likely to have its own issues.
  12. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Good ideas. I am a member of the36-38 club where Jon Kanas has been more than helpful to me. To answer your numbers-- 1. I can think of only two things that could account for the problem--too much removed from the deck and/or head, or, less likely, a very thin gasket. 2. Hardened seats seem to be properly placed. 3. Valves are still in the head. They look perfect so far. Valve action looked fine when running, tappets correct, etc. 4. Clay is a great idea! Valves don't seem involved with my problem, but couldn't it be used to check clearance between piston and head? 5. I've learned that the 38 domed pistons will work. I do have an extra 1936 head still on a parts car not run since about 1956. My wife thinks its possible to have too much of this crap lying around.
  13. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    I recently purchased a mostly original 1936 Roadmaster. An inspector said it was "smooth and quiet. It was not. It has four broken pistons where they have hit the head on the rounded area below the plugs.Two pistons have an additional break and one has lost both compression rings. Surprisingly, cylinder walls and valves are undamaged. Seven cylinders had about 80lb. compression and the "ringless" one had 0lb. The head gasket seems thinner than normal and does not have the copper on both sides that I expected to see. Can that account for this? I wonder if the head has been shaved considerable to correct a warp. Does anyone know the original vertical dimension of the head? Are there thicker gaskets? can I carefully grind material away where the pistons have been hitting? Will newer design domed pistons fit? Any thoughts would be much appreciated. This is my first(and unexpected) shot at engine work.