Bill Stewart

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  1. Bill Stewart

    1936 running rough after overhaul

    Did a little reading about distributor machines. All new to me. I also discovered "Advanced Distributors" who seem to be well known and respected by many of our members. I would like to know if any members have had the response curve altered to improve running on modern gas. Any comments about distributor rebuilding or modifications would be appreciated.
  2. Bill Stewart

    1936 running rough after overhaul

    Bloo, thank you for your many good ideas. The engine was a mess before overhaul. I barely ran it before discovering it had 4 broken pistons, apparently from failing to ream the cylinders for a ring job.The distributor came to me on the car but I recently discovered that it is a 1949 distributor. It is very slightly different than a 36 distributor but appears functionally identical.( Maybe I'm missing something by assuming that?) As to checking the spark advance, I don't know what a "distributor machine" is but it if it checks distributor operation I'm sure I'd like it. I do have a simple timing light, not a "dialback timing light". I have been able to check the vacuum advance in a crude sort of way. Your ideas are very promising. I'll be trying them out asap (right now I'm swamped with summer visitors.) Thank you!
  3. Bill Stewart

    1936 running rough after overhaul

    After overhaul, my 36 Roadmaster engine runs well at idle and up to about 20 miles an hour. It has loads of low speed torque. It then starts to run roughly and gets progressively worse at higher speeds,---- really terrible at 45 or 50. It almost feels like the engine is out of balance except that it is not regular. My next impression was that the point spring was so weak that the contact was just "floating", resulting in very erratic spark. Actually the spring is strong, maintaining good contact. It seems like the The carburetor has been rebuilt, and even trying a different carb doesn't change things. It's been timed properly, gaped, new plugs and wires. Tappets have been carefully adjusted. Vacuum shows about 18lbs with a very tiny regular flutter that i don't understand. There is no appreciable exhaust or breather smoke. The engine is still on break-in oil. Compression at cranking speed is 87 to 93 in all cylinders. My guess now is that the distributor is likely to be the culprit. I don't really know how to test for distributor spark advance behavior. It seems like centrifugal and vacuum functions are working OK.Ideas please? Bill
  4. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    Nice response Rodney. Sometimes we just need to keep smiling.
  5. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    I installed the Remflex manifold gaskets. Still leaked badly--- not the fault of the gaskets. I finally realized that the manifolds were so far out of plane that no gasket could possibly accommodate. The manifolds have now been machined, look beautiful, are all lined up and will go on tomorrow. The machinist told me the exhaust manifold was new, not just cleaned up, and could not possibly have worked together with the intake manifold. This car ran so poorly when I got it that I only ran it a few minutes before realizing it would need to be all torn down. I bought this car sight unseen after a professional inspector found the engine to be "smooth and quiet". Considering that it also had four broken pistons, that could not have been true. There must be a lesson here. But we can't always inspect a car ourselves------ This forum is a wonderful service to newbies such as myself. Often the information is right on, occasionally it's just in the ballpark but it gets the thought processes going. Thanks to everyone who contributes.
  6. Bill Stewart

    1936 roadmaster generator

    My car has been converted to a push button start so I think the five pole regulator's extra protection against activating the starter while the engine is running is now unneeded. It makes sense that the extra thing in the clip probably was a condenser to suppress radio interference. I would actually prefer to have the original accelerator operated starter but for now, at least, I'm going to stay with what i have.
  7. Bill Stewart

    1936 roadmaster generator

    Thank you Jon. Your article showing conversion to a three pole regulator is exactly what I needed. There were indications of trouble with my five pole that I likely would have not been able to solve. Perfect. Bill
  8. Bill Stewart

    1936 roadmaster generator

    The regulator on my car is apparently original. It has the 5 electrical connections shown in the shop manual but does not have the "thingy" attached to the GRD tab in the manual that looks like it could be a condenser. The clip to hold the item is still present.The guy who rebuilt the generator for me has never seen such a thing on a regulator and doesn't know what it could be for. Must have been a reason for it.Can somebody inform me?
  9. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    Thanks for sharing your experience Matt. I'm excited to get it on the road. It is a "driver" and all it needs is the engine finished.
  10. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    I removed the gasket between the heat valve body and the intake manifold as directed by the shop manual. That results in better alignment of the manifolds at the head, but I think not good enough to expect the manifold gasket to seal. It seems to me that Buick's original intent must have been to depend on the ring between the heat valve body and the intake manifold to seal---not depending on any gasket. So I used valve grinding compound to lap the ring and groove, hopefully to improve the fit. I notice that the faces of the heat valve body and intake manifold do not quite meet, but rather, the two pieces are slightly held apart by the ring between them. I recently read about Remflex exhaust gaskets, that they compress from 1/8 in. to 1/16 in., conforming to warped or otherwise irregular manifolds. I ordered a set. I would sure like to know if anyone has experience with Remflex or if anyone has any ideas about this project.
  11. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    Today I took exhaust manifold apart and cleaned joints. The joints now work perfectly so the end sections can be easily oriented to face the head perfectly. They are, however, farther away from the head than the intake manifold and I'm sure they can't be pulled in without messing something up. An equally serious problem is that the center section of the exhaust manifold, when attached to the heat valve body, is forced into a position that is not parallel with the intake manifold. I don't see how any adjustment can be made to correct that. The shop manual says that no gasket is used between the heat valve body and the intake manifold, and that only graphite lube should be used. In spite of that, a gasket (which seems to have a graphite surface for this location is actually available. I did decide to use the gasket. If the gasket is eliminated it looks like the problem would be reduced, but not enough. It's hard for me to believe that just graphite would really close that joint. Is there a graphite lube with body to it? I'm only familiar with the powder. Somehow I need to get all the intake and exhaust attachments in the same plane.
  12. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    Kyle and Matt, good ideas. I'm off to loosen things up carefully and get them reoriented. The 36 shop manual also has a sensible approach consistent with your ideas which I should have read earlier.
  13. Bill Stewart

    36 Roadmaster manifold problem

    I have just installed my newly overhauled 36 Roadmaster engine in the car. On startup the intake and exhaust manifolds both have serious leaks. When I originally took the engine apart I removed the manifolds as a unit with the heat valve body and I put it back that way (with new copper gaskets and the proper torque). I expected that everything would line up properly as it seemed to be originally. So now with the manifolds off again, I note that the intake manifold flanges are farther from the mounting surface of the head than the exhaust manifold flanges. (So they are not in the same plane.) In addition, the exhaust flanges are at a slightly different angle, being about even with the intake flanges at the top but at least 1/16in. off at the bottom. Help! I'm sure pulling everything up tight would be a mistake and I've noticed the price of manifold replacements. My first idea is to separate the manifolds from the heat valve body, assemble everything loosely, tighten the manifolds on the head first and hope that tightening the heat valve body to the manifolds last actually works (maybe by magic and a little cheating with some kind of "goop"). Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. This car is the long awaited replacement for my college car from 1956. h
  14. Bill Stewart

    Cork. The modern replacement is.....cork.

    i haven't had any problems with carburetor or tank floats, even very old ones, but for those who have, maybe coating with epoxy resin would be an idea. I built a gas tank for a boat about 25 years ago using West System epoxy. It's still perfect. Resin mix should be tweaked very slightly short on activator to increase resistance to gas. West System (Gougeon Bros,) site may have more specific mix info.
  15. Bill Stewart

    1936 fan

    Thanks Ben. I thought that design was unique to the 36. It's obviously unbalanced. i should think it might cause vibration or rapid water pump wear.