Bill Stewart

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About Bill Stewart

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  1. Cork. The modern replacement is.....cork.

    i haven't had any problems with carburetor or tank floats, even very old ones, but for those who have, maybe coating with epoxy resin would be an idea. I built a gas tank for a boat about 25 years ago using West System epoxy. It's still perfect. Resin mix should be tweaked very slightly short on activator to increase resistance to gas. West System (Gougeon Bros,) site may have more specific mix info.
  2. 1936 fan

    Thanks Ben. I thought that design was unique to the 36. It's obviously unbalanced. i should think it might cause vibration or rapid water pump wear.
  3. 1936 fan

    I marvel at the weirdly asymmetric fan on the 1936 Roadmaster. Does anybody know why they were made that way? Was it used only one year?
  4. 1936 oil temperature regulator

    Thank you very much Stuart and Matt. I still have one question. I can't see the picture well enough to understand exactly how the water line is plugged. My water line is just a tube which could simply be cut/ pinched off. Would that suffice?
  5. 1936 oil temperature regulator

    I believe the water line through the rocker arm shaft in the 36 was omitted in 37 and in all following years. It was apparently unneeded and I have seen a recommendation that it be disconnected in the 36 to avoid the possibility of a water leak to the crankcase. I have plugged both water connections in the head. Do I just pinch off the water tube at each end of the rocker arm? It doesn't seem necessary to actually remove the (now inactive) water line and it appears that removing the water line would just allow oil to escape. Anybody"s thoughts please. Bill Stewart
  6. 1936-320 pushrod

    Thanks Matt. I'll do that.
  7. 1936 Roadmaster firewall

    Thanks everybody. Sounds like 36 firewalls were painted the body color just like all the other years.
  8. 1936 Roadmaster firewall

    Could somebody who has an original 36 let me know whether their car was built with a black firewall (on a car that is not black)? Somewhere I read that 1936 is the only year where all cars (or maybe just Roadmasters----but that doesn't make much sense) were built with black firewalls. Restored cars that I have seen invariably have body color firewalls. Could everybody be wrong!?
  9. 1936-320 pushrod

    One of the pushrods in my 36 Roadmaster is different than the others! Length is the same but diameter of lower "ball" where it rides in the lifter is larger. Apparently it's been working ok but I sure don't want to put it together that way. The part number for 1936 pushrods is different than all following years and I have not found any for 1936. Can anybody help?
  10. 1936 Roadmaster firewall color

    i read somewhere (can't find it now) that 1936 firewall color should be black, not the body color. Can anybody confirm that?
  11. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Ben, I was only able to run my engine for a few minutes (and wouldnt have done it at all if i'd known what it looked like inside) but timing did not seem too advanced. The carb is a typical downdraft Stromberg.
  12. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    Robin, thank you. Now I'm trying to confirm that 38 pistons will also work in my 1936 320. Anybody know for sure?
  13. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan thank you for your ideas. I've had computer hassles so haven't been able to respond. I don't know why only some pistons (#1,2,7,8) were damaged. All eight come up almost exactly flush with the top of the block. A tiny amount of carbon buildup could then cause the pistons to hit the head. At any rate, I don't think it makes sense to risk using that head. The block needs to be bored and i am having difficulty finding 36 pistons. 1938 pistons are everywhere in various sizes so I think it seems sensible to use a 38 head and pistons if that does not introduce other complications. I note that exhaust manifold part numbers are the same for 36, 37, and 38 but intake manifolds have different numbers. Anyone know what the differences are? I have a Stromberg carb. There were no chunks in the oil pan. Apparently all pieces went out the exhaust valves!
  14. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan thank you for your ideas. I've had computer hassles so haven't been able to respond. I don't know why only some pistons (#1,2,7,8) were damaged. All eight come up almost exactly flush with the top of the block. A tiny amount of carbon buildup could then cause the pistons to hit the head. At any rate, I don't think it makes sense to risk using that head. The block needs to be bored and i am having difficulty finding 36 pistons. 1938 pistons are everywhere in various sizes so I think it seems sensible to use a 38 head and pistons if that does not introduce other complications. I note that exhaust manifold part numbers are the same for 36, 37, and 38 but intake manifolds have different numbers. Anyone know what the differences are? I have a Stromberg carb. There were no chunks in the oil pan. Apparently all pieces went out the exhaust valves!
  15. 1936 Roadmaster broken pistons

    KongaMan, Piston damage on both pistons (and two others} all where piston comes up under spark plug. That flat area is on the same level as the rest of the head surface as though its been machined. Additional damage in other places is probably from broken rings or piston parts banging around in there. No compression ring pieces from the really awful piston were still in the engine when the head was taken off. So----did someone take way too much off the head? I'd like to know what a head looks like that has not been altered. I'm getting used to the idea that i will probably be getting a different head. I can hardly imagine that the pistons are too tall. Surprisingly, cylinder walls are great and rod bearings are between .0015 and .002