Morgan Wright

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Morgan Wright last won the day on December 28 2015

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About Morgan Wright

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 11/05/1955

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Saratoga Springs, NY
  • Interests:
    Old Buicks

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  1. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The yolk is carried by the housing so when you tighten the adjustment nut you shorten the entire housing and the yolk is pulled tight against the half nuts
  2. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The entire column screws down to tighten that very thing. The external column/gear housing/cam become shorter while the internal steering column/screw/half nut stays the same. Your "cam" is called the yolk and it has rollers.
  3. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    I can grind the groove on the endpiece of the other half nut too.
  4. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    Shop manual says to grind the groove out on a stone.
  5. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    This is the type I had in mind: https://www.grainger.com/product/FABORY-Steel-Coiled-Spring-Pin-41LY51 Sheer strength 3100 pounds? That will do!
  6. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The pins were not loose. The previous owner used JB Weld on them.
  7. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    Holes 0.151 inch .
  8. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The 4 pieces of dowel are 0.148 inch diameter as you can see. I used a 9/64 (0.141) drill bit to get them out. The length of the dowels can be measured also. The torsion spring pins from the hardware store failed the shear test. I didn't want that kind anyway. Now to find manganese steel spring pins.
  9. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The undersize drill will do nothing to the hardened steel but it will dig out the dowel in pieces until it all comes out leaving a perfectly round hole. I'm not going to ream anything.
  10. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The dowels are not hardened. I will drill out the broken dowel on the hardened endpiece using a drill bit smaller than the dowel, and then move the bit around the hole to get it all out. From that I can get an accurate size of the new spring dowel. Using a drill bit that exact size, I'll drill the dowel out on the half nut. This will be an easy job, tomorrow.
  11. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The end piece is hardened steel, harder than a file.
  12. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    It's the first thing I saw when I opened it.
  13. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    I always take photos during different steps of taking things apart so I have evidence of how they looked when they were together. This is an important trick to remember.
  14. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    The sequence of photos I attached is the disassembly. It boggles my mind that you think it would be all clean inside during disassembly.
  15. Fun with steering geers---> 1918 Buick

    I'll do a shear test on the pins I use before deciding which ones to use. Manganese spring steel is virtually impossible to break. They make lawnmower blades with that stuff, my 1980 mower deck on my Satoh still has the original blades on them and I've hit 1000000000 rock with them. I've sharpened the blades 20 times. They dull, but are about as unbreakable as steel can be. The pins I use will be that kind.