Roadmaster71

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About Roadmaster71

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  • Birthday 09/30/1949

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    http://www.idlenot.com
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    ke1ri@yahoo.com

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  • Location:
    Rhode Island
  • Interests:
    Old Cars
    Amateur Radio
    Radio Restoration
    Kayaking

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  1. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick: How to remove temp. sensor cable from gauge

    Neil .... Yes it was easy to disassemble the gauge exactly as described. These are things that I have to be told are possible before I attempt them. I'll do almost anything if someone says "it worked for me". I did not want to remove the rocker cover and go that route except as a last resort. I have a habit of getting myself in trouble. Those holes I drilled in the sensor never really penetrated the inside of it. They essentially scraped the inside and cut through the rim of the sensor (just like the rim of a rifle cartridge). I think that allowed the PB blaster to get underneath everything and help out. I may have chipped the shelf it was pressed against but a little sealer of some kind should take care of that.
  2. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick: How to remove temp. sensor cable from gauge

    I finally extracted that pesky water temperature sensor from my 1941 Buick. It took days. I squirted it many times with PB Blaster and wiggled the center pin that protrudes from the piece. It would not budge. I was using long nose pliers. Next I bought needle nose locking pliers (like vise grip). These allowed me to yank the center pin in all directions. I had to be careful with all this because I did not want to ruin the threads of the cavity. Then I drilled two small holes in it and blasted more. No movement. Then I stuck a nail (about 6 d) in one of the holes and moved it from side to side. No movement of the sensor, so I thought. I also heated the base of the sensor with a 30 watt soldering iron (the biggest one that could fit in the 1/2" diameter space). I followed this by packing it with ice and tugging some more. No dice. What I neglected to notice was that for some reason it was now easier to see that center pin. More PB Blaster was applied (drenched). Finally today went to tug on that pin again and noticed that it was actually sticking out of the well. Movement? I tugged again with the pliers and it began to move. Then out it popped with about 2 cups of antifreeze. I would celebrate with several beers except that I would get sick ... on some nasty antibiotics now. I am so relieved! PS: while trying to explain the problem to some friends I made a drawing to illustrate the bind I was in. That is attached below too.
  3. Roadmaster71

    1941 Buick: Access to speedometer cable at transmission

    I took up all the insulating material in the area Dave mentioned. I have no access hatch on my floor, either side. Then I remembered : one of the first things I did upon buying my car (some 16 years ago) was to have new front floors welded in. the driver's side was like a Flintstone pedal car ... you could watch the street go by. The passenger side was not as bad. The doglegs that made the junction between the floor and the firewall area were all shot too. All this was repaired. So, I figured the repair shop just cut it all out and did not replicate the access port (too late to complain now). But reading Neil's response makes me wonder if the '41 did have this port. Someone here must know! Today I jacked up the left (driver's) side. I have one horse under the spring perch and another under the frame. I also have cement blocks and boards under the front left tire and chocks at the rear wheels. I believe I was able to see the cable. I quit for today ... 100% humidity left me soaked to the skin. See attached photo. The floor panel patch is the smooth black area near the top. It looks like they put it together with rivets?
  4. Roadmaster71

    1941 Buick: Access to speedometer cable at transmission

    Dave ... Thanks so much! You are a life saver. I have no carpet so this will be an easy one. You just kept me a little bit safer!
  5. I need to replace my speedometer cable. I have not been able to trace it to the connection on the transmission by just crawling under the car while it is not jacked up. >Is there any way to get to the connection on the transmission without jacking up the car? >Where on the transmission is the connection (top left, top right, etc.)? Thanks. (if you have a file photo I'd love to see it)
  6. Roadmaster71

    1941 Buick Speedometer Removal

    Neil ....I read the speedometer thread quite a while ago. Just now I went out in the garage and disconnected the speedometer cable from the dash end. My plan was to next go back and study Dave's thread. We are thinking alike! I have bought some really nice stuff from Skip Boyer before. I contacted him a few months ago and he said that production was suspended for a couple of months due to recent deaths in the family. He asked me to contact him again in 3 months or so when he hopes to resume production (one at a time). I will do that. I need a bunch of stuff. I may have the current price list ... don't know... will PM you if I can figure out how. Love this board ... just not sure on PM. Thanks again.
  7. Roadmaster71

    1941 Buick Speedometer Removal

    My Pleasure, Neil. Today I removed the ammeter/water temp. gauge from the car. I needed to remove the wiper vacuum hose to get the end of the temp. sensor through the firewall. I also had to remove the grommet in the firewall. That just fell apart. I took the gauge cluster apart by uncramping the bezel that goes around the glass front. Then I replaced both meters with NOS units. I still have the old water temp. sensor stuck in the block. I will be draining the radiator soon and begin work on that. Next is the speedometer. I need to put in a new cable. When all that stuff is done I need to either close it up or buy an entire new front end wire harness and go for broke. At present I am inclined to put in a new harness. If I don't do it now I will be taking this stuff apart all over again in the future. I attached a couple of photos. 1 Gauge cluster with bezel removed and water temp. gauge removed - note plastic turn signal bulb mask which is repeated matches front of gauge. I had to re-glue this in place on its cardboard perch 2 Close up of ammeter showing needle stuck due to warped plastic 3 Gauge reassembled
  8. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick: How to remove temp. sensor cable from gauge

    Don, Thanks so much. Before I read your post that is what I started doing. I'll be removing the vacuum hose to make room for the sensor to easily fit through the hole in the firewall. I need to replace that hose anyway. I'd be done by now except I was called away and am just back now. Too tired. 90 degrees and 100% humidity here. No problem pulling the sensor since it is already broken off. But I will need to get it out eventually. I was not aware of the method you mentioned so you just solved another problem I had! I assume that the gauge opens by prying off the bezel at the crimped areas? I don't see another good way to get at it.. Thanks again!
  9. I am at the point where I need to remove the Temperature / Ammeter gauge cluster so I can replace both of them. How do I remove the temperature sensor cable without breaking anything? It looks like I can pull back the protective fabric sleeve by expanding the split collar. What's next? The replacement unit I have seems to have the end of the cable crimped onto the back of the meter. I'd hate to pull on that and destroy the capillary tube and let out the gas it is filled with. Am I supposed to remove the sensor from the block first, then remove those two screws and thread it all through the exit hole in the meter? Photo below. Thanks!
  10. Roadmaster71

    1941 Buick Speedometer Removal

    This thread and a couple others have been very helpful to me with the removal of the instrument panel in my 1941 Buick. I wrote a blog post that may be helpful to someone who has to do the same job. Just click on the link above to arrive there. A couple other related threads that may be useful: Removing the trip odometer knob Removing the fresh air vent Thanks to all the good folks who participate in this forum!
  11. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick: Removing Trip Odometer Knob

    Glad I can be of some help ... I get more than my share of help from the good people here.
  12. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick : Removing fresh air vent linkage?

    Thanks to the help received here the vent is out! I'll clean things up and replace the gasket tomorrow. While doing this I noticed that the hose to my wipers had fallen off. I guess that means I will be installing a new wiper vacuum hose. Maybe the wipers will work better?
  13. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick : Removing fresh air vent linkage?

    Tinindian ... that make sense about throttle clips. Possibly a source of replacement parts? I think my '41 uses through holes and cotter pins ... but I'm not sure. I do know that it was very easy to pull apart and replace when I swapped out my front carburetor. Thanks for the hint.
  14. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick : Removing fresh air vent linkage?

    Bob ... Thanks ... I will give it a try. I had poked it with a screw driver before but was afraid to break it. I'll put more effort into it now!
  15. Roadmaster71

    41 Buick: Removing Trip Odometer Knob

    Thanks to Neil I was able to remove the knob off of the trip odometer. First I re-tightened the hex nut to keep everything lined up. Then I braced the shaft with long nose pliers (the vise-grips were too cumbersome) and inserted a spring-loaded seam opening tool between the knob and the pliers. Several tries with lots of force popped it off. Then I was able to remove the shaft and put the knob back on (don't want to lose it) loosely with a couple turns of the screw. The seam opening device is the one I used many years ago to open up Macintosh computers that I needed to work on. It's a great tool to have. A photo (best I could do with only two hands) is attached. At this point the knob has popped off. And yes Neil, the shaft has a definite taper! You have the mind of an engineer. If you lived around here I'd invite you right over for a few beers (or iced tea .. your choice). Bonus: In the 16 years I have owned this car the trip odometer was stuck at 44,609 miles (or something like that). Now it suddenly works! I set it to 000000.00 miles. Maybe when I get the new speedometer cable in I will be able to track mileage and apply for the AACA M.A.P. (Mileage Award Program).