Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Taylormade

    1933 Dodge Steering box and shaft removal ?

    Comes out as a unit.
  2. Taylormade

    1933 DODGE DP SIX 1953 ENGINE - T5 SWAP HELP

    If your shift lever comes out of the top of your transmission, with no side levers or mechanism, it is probably original. The 53 had a column shifter, an entirely different beast.
  3. What type of rivets do you plan to use? Getting ready to do a similar operation on my 32 Dodge Brothers.
  4. This is the story of Daphne, the Black Daliha, my once and future 1932 Dodge DL sedan. Warning: this is a story of lust, loss of innocence, betrayal and redemption. Read at your own risk. It was 1965. I was a sophomore at Syracuse university. Life was good. Vietnam was just a distant dark cloud on the horizon. I had everything - except a car. I'd just joined Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. All the cool guys in the frat owned cars. I wanted to be a cool guy. I lusted after a set of wheels. But not the wheels the other brothers were driving; not an MGA, or a new Chevy convertible, or a 58 Corvette, no, I lusted after a big, black 1930s sedan. After all, my favorite TV show had been "The Untouchables." Those long, curvey, full-fendered monsters roaring down a rain-slicked street got my blood boiling. Not a coupe, not even a convertible, but a four door sedan - with sidemounts, of course. That was MY idea of a car! I was immediately shunned by most of my fraternity brothers. On a pleasant spring day I was walking to class and happened to pass by the staff parking lot. Sitting there, under a huge oak, was the car of my dreams. Stunned, I pushed my way through the hedge to get a better look at her. It said Dodge Brothers on the winged badge that adorned the chrome radiator shell. The front fenders held magnificent spoked wheels and hulking Allstate tires. The four door body, black as coal, stretched off into the distance. Lust doesn't even describe my feeling at that moment. I had to own that car. I would kill to own that car. Two minor problems: I couldn't find the owner and I was broke. Day after day I passed by my obsession on the way to class. She sat there, taunting me. My attention slipped, my grades suffered. I spent long nights staring at the ceiling, unable to sleep. Then, one day, I noticed something different about the black beauty. Was it...? Yes, a sign in the window: black with red letters - FOR SALE. And below, in ball point pen - $400. My euphoria was short-lived as I suddenly realized the magnitude of my dilemma. My heart sank. I was doomed. Where was I going to come up with four hundred large? My palms grew damp, my eyesight dimmed. This couldn't be happening. Someone was bound to snap up this gem and she would be gone forever! What to do, what to do? Holding up a convenience store was out of the question. What would my parents say if I got caught? My parents...hmmmm. Yeah, I could call my dad, already strapped with paying my tuition and gearing up for my brother's entrance into the ivy halls of higher academia, and try to extort the $400 from him. My mouth dry, my fingers numb, I dialed sunny California - where my parents had conveniently moved from New York just after I decided on Syracuse as college of choice - and hit up the old man for four hundred clams. Things remained fairly calm until I mentioned the car in question was a Dodge. My father, a GM claims adjuster/manager/executive for 18 years (it would be 40 years before he retired) was appalled. A Chrysler Product! Was I out of my mind? And what year was it? I wasn't sure; late twenties, early thirties? Who cared? It was cool! To this day I don't know why my father said yes to my buying a 33 year old non GM product, but he did. He sent me the money and I was the proud owner of a 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan. My loss of innocence came fast and hard. I treated my gem, my overwhelming desire, like dirt. She never let me down, despite my indifference, my abuse, my thoughtlessness. I was remiss in changing the oil, maintaining the fluid levels, washing her, keeping her safe. I drove her in the snow, in the slush, through the brutal upstate New York winters. I piled into a parked car during a blizzard and somehow managed to scrape up enough cash to have the damaged passenger side fender repaired - twenty-five bucks. I owed her that. A fellow Delt backed her out of the driveway - the driveway was our only parking space and musical cars was the game of the day - and he ran into a parked car across the street. The back window was small on these sedans - low visibility. Gone was the tail light and the fender was crumpled. I couldn't raise enough money to fix it, so I slapped on a cheap aftermarket tail light and soldiered on. She always started, always got me to where I was going, but my treatment of her was beyond the pale. Deep in my heart I knew I was the villain a she was the suffering victim. Then, the call from my dad. Oh, the horror, the horror! My brother was in college now, times were tough and he couldn't afford the car insurance anymore. I'd have to sell the Dodge. I begged and pleaded, tried to talk him into putting her into storage. No deal, sell the car. I put an ad in the paper. The guy who sold it to me called. I wanted $400. He said that was too high. No one wanted my car. It wasn't cool. I wasn't cool. Then a fellow Delt, a kindred spirit, Phil Kennedy, found out I was selling the old girl. His sensibilities were apparently as strange and twisted as mine. He wanted to buy the car. He loved the thirties styling. He'd never owned a car. He lusted after my Dodge. Just one problem - he was broke. He nervously called his father, who read him the riot act and then agreed to give Phil the money. The deal was made and the Dodge passed out of my life - I thought forever. Forty-five years passed. I met the girl of my dreams, got married, had a daughter, three grand-kids. I thought of my old Dodge often, wondering whatever had happened to her, figuring she was probably part of a 1986 Subaru or something equally horrifying. In a moment of insanity, I was talked into joining Facebook by my daughter and granddaughters. I began to catch up on old friends. I thought about Phil Kennedy and my old car. Any chance he still had...no, impossible. I finally tracked Phil down and discovered he had bought another 32 Dodge. My old car was sitting in his grandmother's - now his - garage, and had been there since 1970. At that point I had a 1948 Plymouth and a 50 Dodge Wayfarer roadster. Phil and I exchanged amenities and promptly lost track of each other for three years. I came in from the workshop one day after fighting with the rusted out floorboards of the convertible. My wife could see I was miserable. "Do you really care about the convertible?" she asked. Now, I thought the Wayfarer was a neat old car, but I had to admit my heart wasn't really in it. And then it came to me - the car I really wanted to restore, the only car I really wanted, was my old Dodge, my first car. I struggled to find Phil again. Would he still have the car? Would he sell it? Through another Delt brother I found Phil's email and sent him off the message. It was like that spring day in Syracuse all over again. I lusted after my old car and this time, if I was lucky enough to get her back, I would treat her like the lady she always was. Phil's reply was too good to be true. Since he had purchased his all original 32 he had decided he'd never have time to restore "my" old Dodge. He was thinking about selling her, and had actually though of me first - but he figured that since I already had two cars, I wouldn't be interested. I quickly got that idea out of his head! We made a deal and my first car was coming back home after 45 years. Over the last two months I have sold the Plymouth and the Wayfarer. I hated to see them go, but I wanted to devote all my time (and money) to the restoration of the Dodge. Here's the Plymouth heading off to Texas. I hope to have Daphne finished in time for the 100th anniversary of Dodge in 2014 and drive her up to the big show in Auburn Hills. It will be a daunting task, but she deserves it after what I put her through all those years ago.
  5. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    The results are in, the Stat-O-Seal washers did the job on my leaking brake connections. Once I installed them, the leaking stopped - period. Not a drop of fluid anywhere. They are a combination crush washer and rubber seal. Don't get the steel variety, get the aluminum, as they act as a crush washer and rubber seal. I got mine from Speedway Motors. I needed two sizes, one for the outer part of the banjo bolt and the other for the threaded section. I also got most of the floor spacers done for the floorboards. They rest on the frame and keep the actual floorboards at the correct level. Here you can see the old and the new. The holes in the old piece are there to clear rivets and bolts on the frame. I haven't drilled them yet on the new spacers. Sitting in place on the bottom of the floorboards. The old floorboards before I removed them from the car. And the new ones partially finished.
  6. Bummer. Back to the workshop - glad everyone is okay.
  7. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    Got the three rear most floorboards cut out and routed the edges. The rear floorboard has the mounting holes drilled and the cutout for the differential plate. The attaching edges are routed for an overlapping fit. I still haven't sanded the edges, cut out the battery access, or cleaned things up. The routing was done on my Bosch router table. I was worried about tear-out on the plywood, but I got very clean cuts on all the boards. Each floorboard has a mounting pad made of wood, and attached to each short end, that rests on the top of the frame rail. The wood is 1-1/8" thick, three inches and a quarter inches wide, and the length of the floorboard. Getting lumber of that dimension proved impossible. Rather than having a sawmill plane it for me, I bought some oak from a big box store and glued two pieces together. This gives me a chunk of wood 1-1/4" thick and 3-1/2 wide. I'll use my router to knock off an eight of an inch of the thickness and a quarter inch off the width, and then I can cut the resulting stock to the correct lengths. I should have everything wrapped up by tomorrow evening.
  8. Taylormade

    1927/28 Gearbox rebuild

    Not to be a wise guy, but that’s in there for a reason. Did the car run and drive before you took it apart? I find it strange that it would be missing - unless the trans was out and disassembled before you bought it. I could be wrong, maybe someone was driving the car around for years with the part missing with no problem. Any chance it’s hiding somewhere, misplaced when you rebuilt the unit? Been there, done that.
  9. Taylormade

    New wheel cylinders or resleeve ?

    Same problem with Roberts, but they were totally up front about it and didn’t claim to have the correct cylinders. Keiser31, I’m surprised the 31 and 32 are different. I never noticed until I received my cylinders and discovered the difference. It’s slight - so slight I can’t imagine why the bothered to make them different. Just a slight difference in the bolt hole spacing.
  10. Taylormade

    New wheel cylinders or resleeve ?

    Well, I know the Bernbaum parts won’t fit the rears on my 32DL. Call them and get the song and dance about drilling your backing plates so they will fit. I don’t know why they continue to list them when they are wrong. A guy on eBay is always listing a set of four and they have the same problem. The rear cylinders have an odd spacing between bolt holes and no one seems to have them. I had my original cylinders sleeved.
  11. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    You both may be correct. Phil is correct, the stuff is evenly coated and rock hard. But the concave metal plate screwed to the rear-most floorboard is loaded with grease, that also splattered over some of the floorboard. This deposit appears to have been donated by a leaking differential, or, possibly, the rear ball joint. So, keiser31 may be correct, also. Either way, it’s a mess.
  12. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    You may be correct on that. It’s a mess, whatever the gunk is! I always assumed it was some sort of protective coating, but the more I think about it, the more I think you’re right. I should have learned by now - never assume anything when you’re restoring a car.
  13. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    Now that I have the four blanks cut out, it's time to do some routing, shaping and drilling to get them ready.
  14. Taylormade

    The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

    I'm working on the wood floors of the body. It seems strange that they still used wood for the flooring in 1932, but it is what it is. I would have loved to use the original floors (there are four pieces) but I couldn't. The tops of the pieces is in pretty good shape, but at some point a previous owner had the bottom of the car sprayed with some sort of asphalt rustproofing and this stuff is impossible to get off. It clogs up any type of sandpaper I've tried to use, and heat is only going to set the wood on fire. Nice top surface... Crummy bottom... Plus the floorboard around the transmission area was badly degraded by years of water leaking through the cowl vents. You can see the delaminating plywood. I'm cutting the new floor pieces out of marine plywood, which uses waterproof glue and is designed to stand up against moisture and wet conditions.
  15. Taylormade

    powder coat vs sandblasting and paint

    Powder coating has come a long way since the nineties. I agree with Spinneyhill, a good powder coat with a zinc undercoat is the way to go. My coater gave me a bag of my wheel color powder. You can mix it with clear epoxy for touch ups - although I haven’t had any chips yet.
  16. Taylormade

    1927-27 Buick Project

    I strongly suggest you post this in the Buick Pre War section on this forum. Those guys have lots of good advice and extensive knowledge of these old Buicks. You’ll get quick answers to your questions.
  17. Taylormade

    1927-27 Buick Project

    How is the wood in the body? That always seems to be the big stumbling block in restoring these old Buick’s. Looks like a nice car, glad you’re going to save it.
  18. Try down on the Buick Prewar site. You’ll probably get more responses.
  19. Taylormade

    Valve adjustment

    Yeah, as Spinneyhill says, it's no fun, especially getting in there past the fender, under the exhaust manifold and behind the carb. How noisy are the lifters? All engines make some noise, but a noticeable clicking means you need to adjust them.
  20. Taylormade

    Valve adjustment

    Have you ever adjusted the valves?
  21. Taylormade

    28 Standard Six Horn Button Removal

    You have two control levers, each one is attached to a tube that runs down inside the length of the steering column, one tube inside the other. These tubes extend out the bottom of the steering box and have linkage attached. Remove the linkage from the tubes and they will slide up and out of the center of the steering wheel. With tubes and levers out from the steering wheel, you can get to the back of the levers and remove the horn button.
  22. Taylormade

    28 Standard Six Horn Button Removal

    Yes, same with my 32, except I only have one lever for the lights.
  23. Taylormade

    1913 Maxwell 35

    Was an attempt made to replace some of the wood in the body? I assume that the metal panels between the doors and behind the rear door are gone?
  24. Taylormade

    28 Standard Six Horn Button Removal

    Can you post a shot of your steering wheel? I’m not sure if it’s the same or similar to my 32DL. If it is, I can provide some pictures of how it’s done.
  25. It’s always interesting to hear the backstory on a particular car. Obviously, you determined the correct color was solid yellow. Most Gold Bugs I have seen have a yellow body with black fenders. I’m curious abouthow you came up with a solid color scheme. I liked the all yellow. I watched the Carini show on the Kissel and remember him telling the top guy he wanted to eliminate the oval windows because they were ‘cheap plastic.’ That begs the question, why not replace them with glass?