Akstraw

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About Akstraw

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 11/08/1957

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Hickory, NC, USA
  • Interests:
    1914 Maxwell 25 Roadster
    1915 Buick C25 Touring
    1922 Marmon 34B Touring
    1929 AA Ford Truck
    1930 Franklin Convertible Coupe
    1956 Cadillac Coupe deVille
    1972 Volvo 1800ES
    1987 BMW 325i Cabriolet
    2002 Porsche Carrera Cabriolet

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  1. Akstraw

    This has happened before..

    From a legal title perspective, as you might conclude from the comments thus far, this is a matter that will be subject to interpretation given the applicable state jurisdiction. Given that "the DMV computers are talking to each other", one would think that he who owns the title owns the car. If neither has a title on the database, then the first one that can convince a state to issue a title based upon the evidence he/she has (tag, frame, whatever), will likely own the VIN, and the second to the table will have to get a title as a scratchbuilt car.
  2. Akstraw

    Question about newer car tires....

    It depends on your priorities. Many people shop price above all. Others want to maximize lifetime (mileage). I tend to place more importance on performance and quality. I have always had good luck with Michelin and Continental brands. I agree that Tire Rack is a good platform on which to compare the various offerings. They even have a tire selection guide that will guide you through the process.
  3. Akstraw

    The decline of Sears

    Nice to hear your story, 63RedBrier! My Dad bought my first Craftsman tool set for me at the very same Sears store in Hazleton, PA. I got it for Christmas in 1971; to work on the Model A I had purchased earlier that year. I still have those tools, as well as the metal toolbox. Most are still in service. I have had to replace a few of the 3/8" 12-point sockets in particular, because the 'teeth' were about worn off of them. Just goes to show how much Sears is a part of the American experience. Sad to see their decline.
  4. Akstraw

    Velocity Channel Ruins Wheeler Dealers

    I think the show is as good as ever, and continues to be one of the better ones on Velocity. I enjoyed the Alpha, Scout, and Lancia episodes recently. I always learn something each time I watch.
  5. Akstraw

    Re-production license plates

    I can vouch for the www.licenseplates.tv source as well. A very nice product for $95.
  6. Akstraw

    Molded vs. Woven Clutch Lining

    Thanks for your replies. I spoke with the shop today about the pro's and con's of each. One downside of the molded linings is that they can chip. The woven material that we will go with will be cut from sheet, so won't have the potential seam issue as Hubert has shown. I decided to go with the modern woven material.
  7. Akstraw

    Smiths Farmtruck

    I think it says "Form-A-Truck", not "Farm Truck". Try this link: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/768747.html?1499007791
  8. Akstraw

    Brake drums powder coated

    I don't think that you will have any problems with the powder coating on the outside of the drums, but agree that you should have a bare metal inner friction surface. I don't think it would be safe to drive with the inner surface coated.
  9. Akstraw

    Molded vs. Woven Clutch Lining

    I got a quote on re-lining the plates on the (dry) multi-disk clutch for my '22 Marmon. The supplier quoted the original type molded linings, as well as a woven type lining. The woven would cost about a third less. My question is: Are there technical reasons to select one over the other? Andrew
  10. Akstraw

    how can u check vacuum advance 49 spitfire

    To answer your original question, you can do some bench diagnostics on your vacuum advance with a hand held vacuum gun (Mityvac).
  11. Do you feel the same about question marks?????????
  12. Akstraw

    Generator cutout: 1929 Hupmobile

    The diode I saw was called the "Roadmaster RM-790 HyPower" for under fifteen dollars. It is rated for a maximum of 24 volts and 85 amps, so is probably overkill for a 6v system outputting less than 20 amps. Snyder's Model A shop has part number A-10155-DIO for $2.95 ea. In further investigating this subject, I read that you could lose some voltage through the diode; 0.1 volts or so. I am going to give it a try.
  13. Akstraw

    Stainless Trim Installation

    I am not quite sure I fully understand the real issue, but I will volunteer a few thoughts. First, I would ask whether the stainless steel piece was a perfect fit before the rubber was installed. A piece of rubber will not make a poor fit into a good fit. Steel beats rubber every time. Having said that, I will share that I had a similar challenge with another type of car. What worked for me in the end was to use the cord as much as I could, but I had difficulty with the corners. I bought a few cheap small screwdrivers, and by heating with a torch, formed some oddly shaped pry tools. The most useful was one where the screwdriver shaft was bent almost 180 degrees in one plane with an offset of about 30 degrees in another. It allowed me to get into the corner of the rubber under the trim piece, and manipulate it into place as necessary. It was rather tedious, but the good part was that I only had to do it once, and it worked. Perhaps this idea will be useful to you. Good luck! Sometimes I wonder how they ever did some of these operations repeatedly in the factory.
  14. Akstraw

    Generator cutout: 1929 Hupmobile

    I have a similar concern on my 1930 Franklin. The diode solution is interesting. A quick search and I found a heavy duty diode marketed for RV application. So I just replace the entire cutout with the diode, and hide it under the original cutout housing? Sounds like the thing to do.
  15. Akstraw

    Door Stop Straps for a 20's car needed

    I just replaced a similar one on my 1930 Franklin. I used part number 40-0536-70 from Steele Rubber products. Worked well, but not cheap, though. If I had to do again, I would try making one from United Pacific Part Number A9017, by inserting my own T-retainer, and securing with a pop rivet or some such thing. Much more reasonable cost.