Water Jacket

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About Water Jacket

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  • Birthday 01/01/1902
  1. New purchase ,new problems! 1914 Saxon Model A ?

    Gary -- Wonderful to see ancient old cars still being found and brought back to life. However, the best site for your car is the Horseless Carriage Club of America, www.hcca.org, an upbeat, enthused group of genuine folks committed to both the letter and spirit of pre-January 01st, 1916 automobiles. All best to you.
  2. To much smoke

    Nothing wrong with letting a car sit for five to six months, providing it's stored in a cool, even cold garage, as heat exacerbates all chemical reactions, like rust. Storing cars in a heated garage is just dumb. A cool garage but with an engine block heater is smarter, assuming it really gets that cold where you live. A Chevron engineer told us gasoline (all brands are like aspirin) will last a year easily without Stabil (which we use, anyway) providing it doesn't suffer temperatures above 80 degrees. Have heard marine Stabil even better, but have seen no engineering data, corroboration. As long as i've been in this hobby, it never fails to amaze us how many people still start their engines, run them a few minutes, or even block open the accelerator and fast idle them 15 minutes, or drive them 15 miles and then park them for weeks, months-- a sure recipe for sludge, varnish and carbonic acid, the latter eating rings, bearings. Never, ever start your engine unless you'll drive a sustained 20 miles highway, long enough to equalize temperature of block, head(s), manifold(s). An old mechanic's test was to place your hand on the bottom of the oil pan. If too hot to keep there a few seconds, you got the engine hot enough to prevent sludge, etc. A friend's (non-Classic) '54 Testarossa sat seven months between vintage races with no ill effect ever. He and i have www.masterlube.net devices for full oil pressure before starting our dormant engines. McDonnell-Douglas, Continental, and the SAE all agree that 80-90% of all engine wear is during those first few moments of dry start operation, which is any time your engine's sat inoperable more than a week. Sorry, but there are no "miracle" cheapo elixirs that "clinge" to your engine's wear surfaces to protect them, breathless advertising aside. Silicone brake fluid. Soft water (never distilled which is ion-hungry, leaches minerals like solder in your radiator) and a good quality rust and corrosion inhibitor like No-Rosion's are ALL you need. Avoid antifreeze like the plague unless your car will ever be exposed to two sustained nights of a hard freeze (30 or below), or has air conditioning, which requires 15% antifreeze even in LA or Alburquerque in August to prevent the heater core freezing with AC on, not an issue with any Classics other than a handful of '40-on Packards, '41-on Cadillacs. The Nethercutt Collection does just fine driving each car only once every six months. The above info primarily for those with other interests outside the hobby, or who live in overpopulated hells like LA, the Bay Area, NYC, Atlanta which now sprawl seven counties, Chicago, Houston, Dallas where the nearly nonstop traffic takes the joy out of pleasure jaunts. Bounce your car up and down vigorously every month or two to keep the shock seals moist. Nice car, if a non-Classic. Am s t i l l waiting to hear why the Auburn 8s are CCCA Classics, but not the non-Imperial Chrysler 8s of the same years, which have hydraulic brakes, good lines, and everything else going for them as the Auburn. Posed this question last year, never a level reply. Meanwhile, the above gentlemen otherwise tendered sound advice, and Marvel Mystery Oil's wonderful stuff, its downhome snake oil name notwithstanding. An ancient aero/auto mechanic/machinist pilot friend who still owns the blown '37 Cord Phaeton he bought new as a lad in '42 then worked for Pan Am at Alameda, said the Pan Am chief of maintenance swore by the stuff, ordered it in 55-gallon drums. Consider installing www.ampcolubes.com on your auld Chrysler, a good device for any L-head engine. Fill the reservoir with Marvel. It's period correct for our cars, if you're worried about some twit with a clipboard.
  3. Especially good news if you like to drive at dusk, night, before dawn and want brighter head and tail lights, have extra equipment, like faster battery recovery, easier starting: For all 1940-50 Packards with the 356 engine. Jim at Antique Auto Battery 602 West Rayen Avenue Youngstown, OH 44502-1126 1 (800) 426-7580 www.antiqueautobattery.com AAB also, of course, can supply such bolt-in, 6-volt, positive-ground, one-wire alternators for all Packards and other cars not using the hefty fanbelt of the 356 engines. No butchering or alteration of the car in the least. Comes with complete bracket. If you miss the dim head and taillights at idle at dusk and night, you can easily reinstall your original AutoLite or Delco generator, with its 35 peak amps only when your engine's turning 2,000 or more rpm, anytime, should you tire of having 55 amps at idle, faster battery recovery, etc. This tip strictly for those of you who like me, have long since made your purist bones, and aren't aghast at such a simple, wee upgrade that doesn't harm our cars in the least. Should it make the rest of you feel better, some taxis and other vehicles in the '50s had six-volt alternators. If you don't say anything, few will ever notice your upgrade. Our cars look sleeker with the hoods closed, anyway, and those complaining at the local shine and show might get lives or go work on their own cars.
  4. 6-volt, positive-ground, bolt-in alternators, no alteration required at all, for all 1940-50 Packards with the 356-ci, nine-main-bearing engine. call or email Jim at Antique Auto Battery 602 West Rayen Avenue Youngstown, OH 44502-1126 1 (800) 426-7580 www.antiqueautobattery.com info@antiqueautobattery.com AAB also, of course, can supply such bolt-in, 6-volt, positive-ground, one-wire alternators for all Packards and other cars not using the hefty fanbelt of the 356 engines. No butchering or alteration of the car in the least. Comes with complete bracket. If you miss the dim head and taillights at idle at dusk and night, you can easily reinstall your original AutoLite or Delco generator, with its 35 peak amps only when your engine's turning 2,000 or more rpm, anytime, should you tire of having 55 amps at idle, faster battery recovery, etc. This tip strictly for those of you who like me, have long since made your purist bones, and aren't aghast at such a simple upgrade that doesn't harm our cars in the least. Should it make the rest of you feel better, some taxis and other vehicles in the '50s had six-volt alternators. If you don't say anything, few will ever notice your upgrade. Our cars look sleeker with the hoods closed, anyway, and those complaining at the local shine and show might get lives or go work on their own cars.
  5. The wiper gods at Ficken (631-587-3332 for those of you without 1941-47 Clippers) unable to help, told me that in the '40s, only some Packards and Chryslers used electric wiper motors, and that since this was such a small market, no one's bothered to reproduce the 11-inch blades we need for our 1941-47 Clippers. Has anyone done so lately, is there some reasonable source? What have the rest of y'all done? I don't drive in the rain, but it would be nice to have the right blades on my original arms. Though using the same windshield (and roof, trunklid), the 1948-50 bathtub Packards have vacuum wiper motor and use a different fastening system for their 11-inch blades to the wiper arms. Anyone have a reasonable source for wiper blades for 1941-47 Clippers?
  6. For all 1940-42 Packard One-Sixty and One-Eighty, 1942-47 Super and Custom Super Clipper (and non-Classic 1948-50 Custom Eight bathtubs) with the 356-ci engine and its robust fanbelt: Contact Jim at Antique Auto Battery 602 West Rayen Avenue Youngstown, OH 44502-1126 1 (800) 426-7580 www.antiqueautobattery.com AAB also, of course, can supply such bolt-in, 6-volt, positive-ground, one-wire alternators for all Packards and other cars not using the hefty fanbelt of the 356 engines. No butchering or alteration of the car in the least. Comes with complete bracket, E-Z instructions. If you miss the dim head and taillights at idle at dusk and night, you can easily reinstall your original AutoLite or Delco generator, with its 35 peak amps only when your engine's turning 2,000 or more rpm, anytime, should you tire of having 55 amps at idle, faster battery recovery, longer battery life, etc. This tip strictly for those of you who like me, have long since made your purist bones, and aren't aghast at such a simple, wee upgrade that doesn't harm our cars in the least. Should it make the rest of you feel better, some taxis and other vehicles in the '50s had six-volt alternators. If you don't say anything, few will ever notice your upgrade. Our cars look sleeker with the hoods closed, anyway, and those complaining at the local shine and show might get lives or go work on their own cars.
  7. Avions Voisin

    How "occasional" is the pint of oil? I'd heard such sleeve valve engines used considerable oil, but you own one. Sounds like Voisin tooled themselves to death much as Packard did, producing so much of their car inhouse. Perhaps it's finally time for Voisins to have their day in the sun. To that end, nicely framed and most Gallic a photo above. Are you able to retake it earlier in the day so the light's on our side of the car? Really wish we could find out some details about the trio of Voisin straight twelves. Perhaps someone amongst those here gathered owns the aforementioned $1,100 book and might share a synopsis of the inline 12.
  8. Avions Voisin

    As someone who's been in involved with what was once upon a time, this "hobby," and on both coasts, the Pebble Beach mentality has destroyed this pastime as much as anything, and i say this having auld friends who've won both best in class and best of show there. Phi Hill said it best, that he'd "....seen more cars forever ruined for the sake of another few points" at tournaments of credit lines and ego like Pebble Beach. The wrong materials, the wrong finishes; grotesque overrestoration is de rigueur, despite all the sputtering, proclamations to the contrary. Concourses d'elegance in Europe in the late '20s, '30s, were just that, NOT janitorial d' nonelegance. In the day, the cars were driven through rain and parked on the field, perhaps a bit of mud still on the tires, the cars judged solely on their design, aura, innate allure----nothing else. Retaining a sole "Preservation Class" at Pebble is a bit of cynicism fooling no one, so business can proceed as usual. It says much for the state of the hobby that i post a question about an extremely limited-production Voisin (above) and the only response is that i might purchase a $1,100 tome on the company. And now we're back to yacking about trophy hounds because MOST of these old cars are cosmetically restored old bombs with occasionally rebuilt engines, merely as people like doing engines but not attending to the myriad details that comprise an automobile. Can't help notice that increasingly, posters on this site have some attendant business. Be nice to get back to the cars, the facts.
  9. Need advice & counsel on '30 Packard 745

    Snopak --- Thanks for the above tip. I know John, but haven't seen him in ages, forgot albout him--- and he owns a nice '32 Light Eight roadster, knows the older cars, too. BTW, i have your bound collection of "Packard Tips," a wonderful source which i recommend to all Packardites.
  10. Avions Voisin

    It'd be interesting to hear about Voisins from someone who both owned and worked on them. You get the impression they were essentially what was called an "assembled" car as were Elcar, Gardner, Jordan in the US, perhaps more akin to Auburn-Cord, which used existing Lycoming engines, despite the fanciful Gallic styling. France enjoyed a system of smooth, well-established roads long before we did, and Paris is flat, nothing like Pittsburgh, PA or San Francisco, so wildly overhanging coachwork is a wee bit more practical there-- the French always more willing to suffer for fashion than us. From what we've heard, the Knight sleeve-valve engine is one of those constructs that sounds better than it really was, a notorious oil burner. Smooth as any inline six has natural balance, but at a cost in horrific oil consumption. Anyone amongst those here gathered have real world experience, long trips, casual use of Voisins? Meanwhile, would love to hear more about the three Voisin inline 12s; a pair of existing sixes end-to-end. Bore/stroke, did they have a periodic? How were they, really? Only three were built, the back of the rearmost block intruding upon the driver's compartment, disguised as a console. Equally, it'd be a nice comparison with the one-off 1929 Packard monobloc straight 12 as this is about all we could find: Message contains attachments 1 File (231KB) 20130213154057568.pdf [NOBR>
  11. Need advice & counsel on '30 Packard 745

    Thank you. Now all he needs are the above ignition bits. ?
  12. My old friend finally retrieved the '30 Packard Model 745 roadster he owned 40 years ago. Tho' re-restored in the interim, it sat unused for a few years in a private collection. My hands on Packard experience is with late '30s, '40s. We're in the San Fran/Oakland East Bay area. Anyone know a good source for points/distributor cap, ignition parts? And, as i haven't seen the car since its return "home" last Friday, is the canister at the left side of the engine an oil rectifier or ? How is it serviced? Enquiring minds want to know. Many thanks!
  13. 1939 Lincoln V12 Limo

    In a recent CCCA Directory, Jack and Mona Passey: jpas95076@aol.com and monapassey@aol.com Jack is the go to man for 1920s and '30s big Lincolns Best.
  14. How many 1930 Packard Model 745 roadsters were produced?

    Thank you, Monsignor Fields. Yeah, i doubt my auld friend'll ever wind up parked alongside another 745 roadster. Gene's a bigtime Packard man, so your '46 club sedan's in good hands. One of the first things i noticed on installing the bias-sized 7.00 x 15 radials on my '47 Super was how much faster it stopped, something i wasn't expecting. Regarding the previous poster's comments about my post which he deleted: He alone is NOT the CCCA. He has a right to his opines the same but no more than the rest of us. He is NOT the final arbiter. This is a forum to freely discuss various subjects relating to CCCA Classics and the club itself. Like you, i was hoping to shed some light on what the club can do to get out of the present rut by sharing recurring comments i've heard over the past nearly four decades from myriad Classic-owning non-members. .
  15. How many 1930 Packard Model 745 roadsters were produced?

    Your PM arrived only this afternoon, or at least i only noticed same this afternoon, some of us having lives outside the garage and computer. Meanwhile, i invite whoever deleted my post to man up, repost it and let others decide for themselves.