Beemon

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Beemon last won the day on August 19

Beemon had the most liked content!

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About Beemon

  • Rank
    Unorthodox Restorer
  • Birthday 12/19/1991

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Kent, WA
  • Interests:
    Cars, Women

Converted

  • Biography
    I'm a 23 year old college student trying to piece together my grandfather's old beauty.

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  1. Me and my beautiful 1956 Buick

    Somehow in my infinite wisdom, I have forgotten my road draft tube at home. It's being put in a box and shipped up along with all the other stuff I've forgotten... in the mean time, I don't think it would be wise to drive the car without the road draft tube, so the PCV will stay put. Maybe I shouldn't have taken it off in the first place?
  2. Oil drain plug

    I am to assume my oil pan wasn't tapped, so you should have no issues. What's wrong with the original plug anyways?
  3. Oil drain plug

    My original engine has the 1 inch hex, my new engine has the parts counter plug. The parts counter plug does have a smaller head, but works.
  4. Oil drain plug

    AutoZone or O'Reilly. Any 18mm drain plug should fit.
  5. 5w 30??

    5W-30 seems a little thin, the book calls for 10W-30 and 20W-50 given the ambient temperatures. My last oil change I went from 20W-50 for the summer to straight 30W so I can see the oil pressure.
  6. http://www.ebay.com/itm/1956-Buick-Roadmaster-Nailhead-V8-Sedan-Parts-Car-Factory-Air-Conditioning-/372045279738?hash=item569fa071fa:g:gLoAAOSwVJhZSH76&vxp=mtr Looks like most of the needed stuff is still there, minus the compressor. For $500, might be a pretty good investment for someone willing to upgrade.
  7. 1956 Buick WCFB Rebuild

    So I just found this ad on Ebay for a 56 Roadmaster parts car with an original 56 WCFB and it has the same throttle arm as mine. This leads me to believe the throttle arms changed in 56. Pretty good deal for $500, I think I'll pass this on to Buy/Sell for anyone interested.
  8. Meet "Toby" my 50 Model 51 project

    I used POR15 to seal my tank, too. Someone had claimed ethanol will separate it from the tank and plug up the in tank filter. I've got two years on mine with no issues and only feed the old girl E10.
  9. Saw this on Ebay today. For $50, might be worth it to someone? Looks like a 5 bolt tranny, hard to tell from the pics. I would buy it but I've got no where to store it.
  10. Me and my beautiful 1956 Buick

    So looks like I left my ball peen hammer at home... good thing I brought my brass drift punch! It's a little rough around the edges... I lighty went around the edges of the carb base to get a base groove cut, and then used an exacto knife to cut out a rough edge. Still trimming, but should be good to go soon. I signed it because it's a one of a kind.
  11. Me and my beautiful 1956 Buick

    No, thankfully the walk down to the dorms from the top of campus is much more forgiving.
  12. 57 caballero project

    If it's like a 56, you have to remove the shock mount first, pull the shock out and then remove the shock mount from the shock.
  13. Me and my beautiful 1956 Buick

    No doubt! I'm parked on campus and we scoped out our classes. A good 15 minute walk from the dorm up hill, no parking. I think the only real driving I'll be doing is to the local Wally World and occasional barn adventure at 2 am. By the way, the Mr. Gasket gasket is the right throttle bore, wrong spacing. So I got some gasket material. Good thing I brought my ball peen hammer. On a side note, I may have a job lined up for weekends and off days at a mom and pop auto parts store. Their old boy who knew classics quit recently and I just happen to roll into town in a 56 Buick. Bringing the car has already paid off!
  14. Fuel cap 70 GS

    Might be time to invest in a locking cap if people are swiping gas caps. That's just really petty, the balls on the guy to do something like that surrounded by people.
  15. Me and my beautiful 1956 Buick

    Ride was smooth. I made sure to triple lube the suspension before leaving. No squeaks except for the metal to metal trim pieces at the door jam (screws keep coming loose). I achieved approximately 17.5 MPG from Seattle to Yakima, where I refueled. When I got into town, I didn't realize how hilly the terrain was, and the car started vapor locking on me going up and down the hills after the five and a half hour drive. At one point, loss of power was so great it almost bogged going up a large grade hill and the only reason I survived was because of Low gear. Of course, all these issues went away after I unloaded the cargo and let the car sit overnight. I haven't had an issue since, though the car is running a little rich at 2500 elevation. Good thing I brought my tool box, vacuum gauges, timing light and tachometer! Also only burned through a quart of oil, but I blame the leaky rear main and probably the PCV system for that. Now that I'm here, I'm probably going to revert a lot of the stuff. I'm really finicky about this type of stuff, and should probably not listen to my father, whom goaded me into installing the alternator, Edelbrock, etc. before leaving. He was one of those guys who hot rodded in the 70s and threw out the q-jets and thermoquads and replaced them with the Carter comp series, bought the big MSD box and other go fast parts. Newer is better he says. Still not convinced. Also tore at the WCFB today in the men's restroom here on the 11th floor with nothing but compressed air and water. Kept at it until I didn't see any more particulates. My buddy boiled water in his coffee pot for me to douse the carb with, seemed to work pretty good in the sink... resident hall advisor had walked in on us, asking what we were doing. We told him it was a science experiment and he walked off. Air horn gasket still looks good, no signs of shrinking and all the holes still line up so I sprayed it with some WD-40 to moisten it up and tightened down the screws. The floats were still ok, used a 3/16" drill bit to check float height and a 7/16" bit to check float drop. Go to reach for my WCFB gasket in my tool box and - oops! Left it at home! That's okay, after doing some research, Mr. Gasket #57 is 1 7/16" square bore, which is what I measured on the bottom of the WCFB. O'Reilly here in town has them in stock, so I'll just end up tracing out the carb base with an exacto knife and then use a hole punch for the stud holes.