Luv2Wrench

Members
  • Content Count

    907
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Luv2Wrench

  1. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Very excited to start a new project that is very similar to the Metz Roadster project. The MG TD is also a basket case and my daughter is also going to be helping. The differences, however, are pretty big. The MG TD was a running car that was disassembled for a restoration that was never completed, the sheet metal is in near perfect condition and was, at one time, ready for paint. Unlike the Metz, parts for the MG TD are available online... very different from the Metz. This is also a different daughter, as this is my younger daughter and she will be joining the project this summer after she returns from her freshman year in college. I hate to interrupt the Metz restoration just as I had finally gathered/reproduced the missing items but the chance to work on the MG TD with my daughter this summer might be a once in a lifetime opportunity. While the Metz is an interesting car to me, the MG TD is an amazing looking car to my daughter and thus very interesting to work on. We can also order parts and spend our time working on the car rather than making parts (though that process is growing on me). Here is a picture of the engine, parts (and junk), main body and chassis parts. The body, engine and transmission are all number matching so this is a real car and not an "accumulation of parts" like the Metz. It appears the car was last on the road in 1978. Yes, you see MGA parts here and there. The MG TD was being restored along with an MGA and MGB GT. My parts include a fair number of MGA parts though the MGA is nowhere to be found. The person I bought the TD from still has the MGB GT and it is for sale. The plan is to sort parts, rebuild engine/transmission while waiting on daughter to finish first year of college. Once she gets home we'll get the chassis painted and assembled. From there it will be body work/paint, assembly and then interior. (I must chuckle at how simple the plan seems...)
  2. Well said... I have thought many times that without the Internet I would have missed this work of art. Of course Roger has to also take the time to post these pictures as well!!
  3. Wow that looks like a lot of setup work... I'm just not sure I have the patience for something like that. I love the little jack you have in the first picture, I'd love to find some like that.
  4. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Still moving forward... another very busy weekend coming up so not much more will get done.
  5. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Interesting, I guess on this side of the pond it isn't banned?? I've probably got enough to last me for quite some time so if they do stop selling in the States I'm probably OK... maybe I'll buy some more just to be sure. Looking forward to seeing more work on the Humberette.
  6. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Mike, very interesting, when I look at the blue chromate page it says "In Stock"... I wonder if they are looking at the region identifier in your browser and determining that they can't sell it to you. The chromate process does add a fairly significant amount of corrosion resistance so it is worthwhile to do. Let me know what you find!
  7. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Mike, I started with Caswell's copy-cad plating kit and while it did work well until the solution failed, I'm not sure I'd recommend that route. I used the formula that this guy used http://www.gomog.com/allmorgan/ZincPlatingAtHome.html and it worked fine for me. I did use Caswell's blue chromate as a last step. Here's some info here: https://www.caswellplating.com/electroplating-anodizing/zinc-plating-kits/chromates/blue-chromate-8oz-makes-1-quart.html I haven't had any issue with this solution getting contaminated and I continue to use it and imagine I will for years to come.
  8. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    I hadn't thought of getting some hexagon bar, that's a great idea. A couple feet of various sizes would be great to have on hand, thanks for the tip! The last two photos above show the zinc plating. The first (of the last two) shows the parts before plating and the second is them after plating. They could be smoother and brighter but I'm just going for protection here. I media blast them, etch, rinse, plate, rinse, blue chromate, rinse and dry. They usually need a little buffing in the end.
  9. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Yes, they are Whitworth heads with BSF threads. One of the first purchases I made when I got the car was a tap and die set for BSF threads. They're high quality and I've had no problem cutting threads with them.
  10. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Managed to get out to the shop today for the first time in a week or so. A couple of weeks ago I tried to plate a bolt and the plating solution had major issues. I talked to Caswell but there didn't seem to be anything that could be done, some kind of contamination of the solution had occur. The support person said that "this happens a lot". That was pretty frustrating because the plating kit cost a lot of money and the solution was supposed to last "forever". I looked around on the web and found a couple of different formulas for zinc plating and picked the one that had the best pictures This new solution worked really well and I was able to get a lot of parts plated which was very helpful as I have multiple components waiting to go on the car that needed various bits of hardware plated. One of the components waiting was the radiator and once I got the engine stabilizer plated I was able to get it mounted. I thought this would be a pretty simple procedure but it was anything but. The lower mounting bracket needed to come off, get connected to the radiator and then rotate the assembly up, connect hoses and reattach the mounting bracket. I hoping that doesn't have to come back out again. The steering assembly has another piece waiting and it had another issue. One of the special bolts that I removed from the parts car broke as I took it off. Moss wanted $17 for the bolt and of course there's $12 shipping and another 4 day wait, so I put some steel in the lathe and made a bolt. It came out very nice and I'm getting a much better feel for the lathe. I've tweaked a few things on it and I've been able to take much heavier cuts as well as getting a much better finish. I don't have the mill hooked up yet so I had to cut the hex head by hand with a file. I did it by eye and it turned out a little small but it fits ok in the socket wrench and will work fine. I plated the new bolt and the older ones and I'll get the steering assembly on next week. Finally, I'd like to thank Mike Macartney for turning me on to Old Engine Oil beer. This is a black ale brewed in Scotland and while quite expensive here in the States, it is well worth every penny. Thanks Mike!!
  11. Looks fantastic, I bet that first "drive" was a blast!!
  12. I hate when reality gets in the way of a good plan!! At least you noticed it now, I would have noticed it when the engine seized from not getting enough oil. How does the pump interface with the camshaft... is there room for a gear there?
  13. Alignment is really looking good, and boy that car has some lines!!
  14. Ah.. the giant quarter returns!
  15. Luv2Wrench

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    More great work, love seeing the pictures! I've really fallen in love with that car... just the right mix of wood and steel and such a nice size to work on.
  16. Agreed, the manifold fits perfectly with the engine in every way. Job very well done!
  17. Great job, thanks for posting the steps!
  18. Luv2Wrench

    1960 MGA Restoration

    Great news, looking forward to more updates!
  19. Luv2Wrench

    Mercedes Car Show

    A local section was having a car show at our athletic club today and I stopped by for a quick look. Saw two nice 300s, one a coupe and the other a cabriolet. The coupe was very well restored while the cabriolet was a survivor. It was in fairly good condition but looks a lot better in these pictures.
  20. Luv2Wrench

    1961 Mercury Meteor 800 restore

    Fantastic job with the clear. If you can lay it down like that you could have used finger paint as your base.
  21. Luv2Wrench

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    Yes, this was what I referred to in my post above, "tendency to split parallel to the direction of force is minimized as it can't expand (bound by the hole)" . As Spinneyhill suggests, you can get a plug drill and make a custom plug and this works great for bigger holes. Excellent work on the door, very enjoyable to tag along via your pictures! Please keep them coming!!!
  22. Luv2Wrench

    1952 MG TD

    Clutch disc finally came in and I was able to get the clutch, pressure plate, bell housing and gearbox on the engine. It is very nice to have the engine in the car!! I have a bunch of things to add tomorrow and over the next week. I'm hopeful that I can try starting it next weekend though we do have plans to be out of town.
  23. Luv2Wrench

    Ben's 1970 Barracuda

    Great progress!
  24. Luv2Wrench

    REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

    Screws into end grain are not as bad as nails but yes, you'd like to avoid that. Drilling a pilot hole well help with that and using the correct screw helps as well. The big difference with the plugs is that it is contained in a hole with glue such that the tendency to split parallel to the direction of force is minimized as it can't expand (bound by the hole). If you have a bigger hole to plug you can get a dowel bit or use a small hole saw to create a plug that will orient the grain perpendicular to the screw.
  25. At least it still floats...