nzcarnerd

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Everything posted by nzcarnerd

  1. nzcarnerd

    Log truck

    This photo was posted on a New Zealand facebook page today with a few other historical photos from the Havelock area of the South Island but I have my doubts it was taken in NZ. Maybe more likely the US?
  2. nzcarnerd

    Log truck

    A Google image search of Darius Kinsey logging photos produces good results. More here - https://formfollowsfunctionjournal.tumblr.com/page/244 And here - https://formfollowsfunctionjournal.tumblr.com/post/30048464162/i-found-this-1896-picture-of-some-seattle Fairly obviously the log truck photo dates from alter than 1896.
  3. nzcarnerd

    Log truck

    Re the speed, I think that truck in the original picture is being operated on a private road, but knowing how bad the brakes were - nothing on the front axle and no power assistance, 12 mph is plenty fast enough. The ride on solids is not that good either. I have driven a solid tyred fire engine, and was surprised how well it rode - on a good surface. Probably not so good on less than perfect roads. Remember also that even for pneumatic tyred vehicles the speed limit pre WW2 was only 20 mph in many places. Those early trucks only had about 50 bhp to play with so their performance would be limited by that too.
  4. nzcarnerd

    Log truck

    I did a quick look round the net myself and found it was on a pinterest page - which I am not hooked up to so didn't find the source. A cedar tree in BC sounds more logical to me. Here in NZ I have not seen reference to those log roads. Most of the early logging was done with bullocks and then with small steam railways.
  5. nzcarnerd

    Log truck

    Optical illusion?
  6. nzcarnerd

    Duesenberg

    Look forward to a you tube video?
  7. nzcarnerd

    Duesenberg

    Is what I read somewhere true that all of the Duesenberg chassis and engines were built in the first 12 months - 1929-30 - and it took a few years to sell them?
  8. nzcarnerd

    Garden gnome ID?

    1927 Chrysler. There should be a serial number stamped into the chassis at the far left rear corner.
  9. I haven't researched the car but maybe a Davis? https://search-bcarchives.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/murphy-family-who-operated-store-at-glyn-station-second-saanich-interurban-trestle-in-background
  10. nzcarnerd

    What is this!!!

    On page 343 of my 1982 Standard Catalog of American Cars there is one of these captioned as a 1901 Columbia Mk XXXI. One in the Henry Ford Museum. The OP has tiller steering - maybe a year earlier.
  11. nzcarnerd

    Car identification

    Back in the day there was a TV and radio news reader in NZ called Cedric Nissen. This one turned up on a local facebook page just couple of days ago. 1966 Nissan Cedric which was probably sold in NZ as a Datsun Personal Six. Oddly enough the owner who registered it thought it was a Nissan Cedrick (sic). Or more likely the clerk at the registration centre couldn't spell - a common occurrence. https://www.carjam.co.nz/car/?plate=DO4209
  12. nzcarnerd

    Help identifying this early 1920s car

    In answer to how common was the Nash. in 1923 Nash had only been going a few years - first year 1918 - and was still becoming known. In 1923 they sold about 40,000 cars. The contemporary Buick six - remember Buick had been going a lot longer - was slightly cheaper, and Buick sold over 100,000 cars. The year 1923 was a boom year for sales and some sources quote nearer 200,000 for Buick. By comparison Ford sold about two million cars in 1923, although they were only about one third the price of the Buick and Nash. There were a lot of other makes in the Buick/Nash price range but many of them fell by the wayside in the early 1920s as the major makers gained superiority.
  13. nzcarnerd

    Early Akron, Ohio street scene. Identify the car?

    My method would be to have two versions on the page open. Start the hew topic by going to the what is it page and hitting 'start new topic', write your thread, then go back to this one and copy the link and paste it in the text on the new page.
  14. nzcarnerd

    Early Akron, Ohio street scene. Identify the car?

    I suggest you put the new pic of great granddad in his car in a separate post, with a link back to this one.
  15. nzcarnerd

    What is Uncle Ben's car?

    Maybe a Davis? The wheels don't match the examples I have found though. https://search-bcarchives.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/uncle-bens-car
  16. nzcarnerd

    Car identification

    The Cedric model name has been around since 1960. In export markets it was usually given some other name. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Cedric
  17. nzcarnerd

    Flat Head Straight 8 327

    I think you are right - but did the 327 Packard have 327 cast on it? I have seen pics with Packard Thunderbolt cast in the head. Nobody else di a 327 flathead 8.
  18. nzcarnerd

    Please help identify

    I have no idea of the make at this stage but because the car has front doors I think it might be more like 1911-12 but not later. The photo date might be a few years later by the length of the woman's skirt maybe.
  19. nzcarnerd

    Please help ID early hearse

    Maybe a circa 1905-06 Rambler?
  20. nzcarnerd

    Buick 'raceabout'

    Re: the exposed valve gear, we can't see from this angle but for the first couple of years when the bore was smaller _ displacement 224 cid _ the valves were inline. For 1918, when the bore size was increased. the valve were staggered. For 1919 they got covers over the valve gear.
  21. nzcarnerd

    Buick 'raceabout'

    Looking further on the Smokstak site after looking at the link on the thread trying to ID the T head engine, here is something slightly interesting. With the cantilever rear springs and exposed valve gear I reckon 1916-17-ish. The radiator and gas tank could be as early as 1912. Mechanicals in what the Brits call 'oily rag' condition. The chassis ID tag can just be seen, on the front of the left side chassis rail, just forward of the radiator. That would determine the date. We have a 1926 Pontiac along similar lines, though it needs more development to make it suitable for street use. BTW, an impressive backdrop. is it not? https://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=179916
  22. nzcarnerd

    Need help ID'ing T head engine please

    What had me wondering was the quoted bore an stroke figures. 3" x 3" is a very small engine - less than 100 cid. Even the little Overland engine from the early 1920s is 3-3/8" x 4" (for circa 140 cid). We look forward to the day it is dismantled.
  23. nzcarnerd

    Need help ID'ing T head engine please

    Maybe drives a belt?
  24. When you click on 'view full article' the photo is bigger. This particular one looks to be not very clear anyway.
  25. nzcarnerd

    Need help ID'ing T head engine please

    Could this be a stationary power unit rather than automotive?