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  1. 30 points
    Received latest issue of Hemmings Motor News yesterday. You know, the bible of the old car hobby, the source for cars and parts that we've used for years. I first started subscribing in 1965, and never missed a year. So, last month they ran an editorial that discussed, among other things, the death of the old car hobby, in regard to pre-war cars. That's pre-World War II, for you young'uns. Oh wait, there are no young people interested in those cars, according to some. From the letters section, two things, both from same letter, and Sir, if you read this forum, no apologies, I think you're wrong: 1-"....all the old folks who owned or enjoyed the hobby of the 1910-1950 era cars are dying off or too old to enjoy them anymore, and want to sell them. Who is going to buy these cars that are out there?" Now, in the same issue, in the auction reports: 1910 Cadillac - sold, $104,500 1904 Premier - sold, $341,000 1909 Thomas - not sold, not meeting reserve, $580,000 1929 Packard 645 phaeton - sold, $319,000 1923 Pierce sedan - sold, $107,800 No one wants them? Really? It's not that NO ONE wants them, it's that SOME PEOPLE don't want them, and they thus assume NO ONE wants them. Their thinking is "I don't like to eat broccoli, so I don't think anyone likes to eat broccoli". This is flawed logic. Sure, there are older guys collecting cars, but there are also younger guys coming along who have money and like the old cars. Maybe not as many as it used to be, but it sure seems to be enough, otherwise prices on good cars would be dropping drastically. I keep hearing gloom and doom, and "I'm going to wait a few years and buy those cars for pennies on the dollar", but it sure doesn't seem to be coming true. The market segment that IS dropping in price/value is the project car area. The cost of restoration these days is so high that projects just won't bring good money. 2: ".....don't like how they [old cars] drive. Try driving a 1930 Model A on a trip. No seat belts, hard to start, drives like a truck, and you better know how to double clutch those old cars....not really fun to drive" Seriously? He states he "sold his Model A", well, sure, I would have sold a worn out, neglected, poor condition Model A too. Instead of fixing the car, he assumes, as many do, that ALL Model A's, oh wait, let's include ALL pre war cars, are horrible driving vehicles. Astounding. The burgers down at my local diner are awful, thus all burgers everywhere must be awful. You guys out there that get it, know how well nicely a maintained or nicely restored car early car drives. You guys who don't get it, that's fine, just don't eat any burgers, cause if you did find and eat a good burger, then you'd have to change your mind. Changing minds is very difficult these days. My rant for the day.....
  2. 20 points
    This past Friday I boarded an American Airlines plane for DFW connecting to Calgary, final destination Kelwona, BC. As is obvious from my handle I have a 1938 Buick Roadmaster Model 80C the convertible Sedan (of Phaeton as Buick referred to it) . What you may not know is that my father has 1938 Roadmasters as well. A Model 81 (Trunk back sedan) and a Model 81F (Formal sedan with divider window and the rarest of the 4 Roadmaster models produced). So that's 3 of the 4 '38 Roadmaster Model...The 4th is a Model 87, the sport sedan AKA a slant back sedan. Buick made 466 Model 87's in 1938 exporting ZERO. In approximately 15 years of looking I have come across 6 left know to exist. Some of you may be aware that you can save a search within Google and Google will email you if it finds new web pages with your search result. I have several setup searching for various Buick related rarities. In July of this year I got a result back on my Model 87 search, A model 87 for sale on Kijiji. The link was no longer valid but through google search results I determined that the car for sale was the same one I had documented for sale in 2011 and determined the phone number in the current ad ( no longer able to be viewed except in the search results) was the same as the one i had saved in 2011. A call to the owner and the car was indeed still for sale but the owner had gone on extended holiday and would not return until mid Sept. Side bar: My father at age 38 bought what is now my 80C...the original NYC sold car had made its way to North Bay, Ontario, Canada. My own 38th birthday passed and though I didn't forget about the car it was on the back burner of my mind until while coaching my son's soccer game I got a call and a VM. Long story short pictures were sent and agreement in principle made and the process of importing this car back into the US begun. History: The seller has owned the car for half his life and half the car's life ...39 years...he acquired the car in Guam. Apparently it was a Southern California car that was imported to Guam by an illicit drug dealer who forfeited the car during the seizure of his assets once he was caught. The seller eventually imported the car back to Oregon where it resided for many years and subsequently moving to British Columbia. The seller offered to trailer the car to the Border crossing at Sumas, WA. My plan was to then drive it from Sumas to a location in Seattle area where I could then have it transported back (less a border crossing) to NC. Where in Seattle was the question. A quick scan of the Roster and a PM to the Forum's own Brian Laurence (Centurion) and i had a destination. 150 miles in an 80 year old car I've never seen but in pictures and never driven. As the weekend approached I began to realize I'm out of my mind to do it, but it's gonna be a great adventure none the less. I packed up my tools, a tow rope, spare fan belt and other supplies. I considered the possibility of bringing a spare generator, starter, etc. and decided that would just be too much weight to carry for a car the seller swears would make it the journey no problem. So I checked my bag, something a I rarely do despite traveling a LOT for work ( any tool of 7" must be checked per TSA) and off I went to Dallas. And then the fun begins... We landed in Dallas about 10-15 minutes ahead of schedule, for which I was delighted as it was going to be a tight connection. HOWEVER, another plane was in our gate so 20 minutes after our scheduled arrival time we disembarked. For those of you familiar with DFW, it is HUGE, and i not only had to switch gates, but switch terminals (on the complete opposite side of the airport). So off to the races I went. I swear it had to be a mile run ( I just checked it on Google Earth and my path was 0.80 of a mile). About 2/3 of the way to my gate I hear the final boarding call for my flight to Calgary. I yelled at an unoccupied gate agent I was passing to call to my gate and let them know I was almost there. Boarding the plane last I got a large glass of water from the attendant and settled in to my first class upgrade seat for the 4 hr flight to Calgary. It was at that moment I realize that it was wonderful that I made it, surley my bag on a more direct path would make it too. A quick interrogation of the flight attended revealed that there were in fact waiting on ONE MORE BAG. Surely that was mine...the airlines ap has a bag tracker lets see what that says....Last update: "Loaded in Charlotte"...hmm. wait 2 minutes reload...Last update: Arrived in Dallas 5:25PM...Its 535PM ok that was 10 minutes ago, they are waiting for a bag i'm good...boarding door closes...update...hmm...update...ok supposed to have this phone off...update.... ok on the runway better turn it off...and we're off. Larger portable electronics are now free to be used...update...Last update: Arrived in Dallas 5:25PM. That update did not change until well into the following day ( more on that later). So 4 hours and many beverages later (at one point the stewardess had me double fisting, Amaretto in one hand and Tito's in the other) I had to formulate a new plan as i knew my bag would never make it to Kelowna in time as i had arrange for the seller to pick me up at my hotel 8AM the next morning and I knew i was on the last flights to Calgary and Kelowna and no earlier flights existed either. Well I'd just have to do it with out tools and if I ran into trouble I had my BCA roster and a AAA card...The rest of the day went without indecent (except for no phone signal in Canada) and I arrived at my hotel at midnight pacific time 3AM my time. I filed a lost bag claim in there as well and asked they either send my bag on to Seattle or back to CLT. The seller and his wife picked me up at 8AM sharp and off we went on the roughly hour and 40 min drive back to his house and the location of the car. Here are some photos from along the way. Merritt, BC in the Nicola Valley Welcome to Merritt! We arrived at the sellers house which was chock full of neat stuff and beside the '38 he had a 65 T-bird Convertible, a 51 Chrysler, a 40 Packard 110 and a few 70s era trucks. I looked the car over, test drove it and got ready to load it up for the border...Hey where is the spare tire, it's not in the trunk?? oh there isn't one... so no tools, no spare and we are behind schedule so I'll be running out of daylight at the end of the journey... ok I can do this, no worries. So we loaded up Seller had LOT of unique stuff Shortly after we depart the seller asks his wife if she has their passports. I thought this odd and inquired why they needed their passports and if they were going into the US after they drop me at the border. "We're taking you all the way to Puyallup". You're what? I thought you were only taking me to the border and I was on my own from there? "Well you can do that if you want, but we planned to take you all the way." I quickly considered my predicament and as much as I wanted to enjoy my planned country drive through northwestern Washington state, the thought of having to brave traffic looming in Seattle, and the lack of the various items I would need in case of a break down made it an easy choice. Here are some photos from along the journey from Merritt, BC to Sumas, WA and eventually at the border. US Border at Sumas, WA We, as I assumed, hit traffic on the 405 around Seattle, creeping past the site of the 2007 BCA National Meet and eventually Mt. Rainier off in the distance. More traffic in Renton, but at 6:15 with darkness setting in we arrived, unloaded and tucked the new treasure in Brian/Centurion's garage. Brian had some friends over for game night and it was fun to meet all of them, some who seemed quite shocked that I would travel all the way from NC for a car... Brian lent me his 96 Riv to get to my hotel and back, great car...and that blue is one of my favorites of that era Buick The next morning after breakfast Brian took me on a tour of Tacoma's amazing architecture and Historic Auto Row, after that we left for the airport and I was home to CLT around 9PM, my whirlwind weekend finally over. My bag however eventually made it to Calgary...from Calgary it somehow got to LAX and arrived in Charlotte today I hoping I get frequent flier miles for my bag as well as my own journey... Griot's Garage in a former Coca-Cola bottling plant The original auto row in Tacoma Mueller- Harkins original Buick dealership above and floor of it below. Mueller-Harkins eventually replaced their original store with this circa late 40's early 50's dealership a few blocks away Love the Terrazzo!! Brian said this neighboring building was the DeSoto dealership. Certainly a trip to remember and while not quite as eventful as my father's journey to Canada to get my 80C no less epic. Many many thanks to Brian/Centurion and family for their amazing hospitality. The BCA and the forum are lucky to have such a amazing man in our midst. That's it for tonight tomorrow I will post some photos of the car itself. It's certainly not a 400 pt piece, but it will be enjoyed!
  3. 18 points
    Thought this worth sharing with the Forum. This 1930 Lincoln model L engine has come back to life after 65+ years of being dormant. Now on to the rest of the car........
  4. 17 points
    I recently involved in the sale of a large collection of cars. I saw classic outstanding vintage cars nestled in with simple inexpensive cars in all shapes and condition. A massive collection of over 300 cars. There seemed to be no order, no theme. I talked with the manager, Jeff who had maintained these cars for about 24 years. This was the Collection of S. Truett Cathy, Founder of Chick-fil-a. Jeff asked Truett why he was buying so many different cars, and Truett responded, "For Investments." That made sense to Jeff. Investments in classic cars can often bring great rewards. But Jeff noticed that Truett had bought a car and paid much too much. Very much more than the possible value. Jeff thought he should mention this "mistake" to Truett? Maybe Truett didn't know he paid too much? But Truett had brought a small restaurant into a multi-billion dollar business and Truett had told Jeff that he was buying cars as investments and this made no sense to Jeff. Fortunately, Jeff needed to get some paperwork from the seller and the seller mentioned that Truett had really "blessed him." He went on to say that he had cancer. He was broke and could not continue treatments until Truett bought his car giving him enough money to pay his bills and get additional treatment and he was now cancer-free. Jeff realized that when Truett Cathy spoke about investments, he meant investments in people. The money flowed as well, but Truett Cathy's business was based on investments in people. Think about this if you happen to be in a Chick-fil-a restaurant. It is an enjoyable place for happy employees serving an experience. People connecting with people. It pays great dividends. Investments.
  5. 16 points
    We need some positive posts on the Forum. The Buick Club is a great club with great people and this thread will prove that. This past month I've been helped by 4 BCA members and I want to thank them for what they have done for me and I invite you to thank a BCA member who has done you right. I'll start in chronological order for the past month 1. Lamar Brown - I asked if Lamar would be interested in trailering my 80C to Hershey. Without hesitation he was on board and sacrificed his time and drove significant distance to help me finally have my 80C on the showfield at Hershey 2. Bob Coker - When we found Lamar's trailer was just a hair to small for my 80C he lent Lamar and I truck and trailer to get to Hershey. 3. Brian Laurance - I asked Brian if I could store a to be purchase Buick at his place while I arranged for transportation back east. Without hesitation he agreed and then proceeded to remove his own car from his garage so mine could be inside and give me a tour historic dealership buildings of Tacoma. 4. Paul Haddock - Paul offered up his truck and trailer to me so I could take my 80C to Hilton Head for the Concours. While I've sent a personal thank you to each of them, I want to publicly thank them as well for their assistance. And while this is just a few great BCA members who've done something in the past month I can think of numerous others I owe a thank you to ( Ben Bruce, Brian Clark, Dave Berquist, Dave Tachney, and John Kilbane are a few that come to mind). Which BCA member has done you right and deserves a thank you???
  6. 16 points
    What have you learned on this sight? (see below if you question my spelling) Here's my list: THINGS I’VE LEARNED ON THE AACA FORUM The best and most relevant advice you can give a would-be seller is “call Jay Leno”. A car in a nice metal building with fluorescent lights can be called a barn find. Leaving the dust, dirt, and pigeon droppings on a found car tremendously increases the value of said car. Every unidentified car in a picture is a Ford. If it’s not a Ford, then it’s a Packard. The forum is on a sight, not a site. There are breaks on car, not brakes (oh, wait, this might actually be correct, old cars do break). There, there, they’re selling their car. Some grammar is unexceptable. Accept mine. No matter how fine a restoration is, when pictures are posted of the finished car, someone will say something like: “well, it’d be a nice car if that flabberdash crickpat were rotated ten degrees clockwise, like its supposed to be, ruins the whole car”. An Antique Automobile forum can allow the words “computer”, “module”, and “electronic” to be posted. Oh, and "error codes"..... 6 volt batteries never worked, and it wasn’t until 12 volt batteries became commonplace that everyone got to work on time. Two wheel brakes don’t work, so they should be upgraded to: Four wheel brakes, but they don’t work, so should be upgraded to: Hydraulic brakes, but darn, they don’t work because they are: Drum brakes. Thank goodness disc brakes were invented or we’d never be able to stop.
  7. 16 points
    My son and his fiancée made a very special request of me back in May of 2017. They asked me to chauffeur them in my '41 Buick Roadmaster sedan on their wedding day. I was thrilled to be given this opportunity. I was also quite anxious. My car is no beauty and it is on a constant repair and improvement schedule. A lot had to be done before the wedding date. I have chronicled the event on my WordPress blog and you are welcome to read the entire story. Just click the blue link to get there. I hope some folks enjoy the story and are encouraged to post their own story here on the AACA forum. Thanks! (Note: Photograph courtesy of Matt Ferrara Photography)
  8. 16 points
    Took the Roadmaster out to the last big cars and coffee of the season. Temps in the 70s today and tomorrow, first snow storm of the season on Monday. Had the Eldorado out too, just to enjoy the weather. Scott
  9. 15 points
    The doom and gloom cries of the "dying old car" hobby are nothing new. When I got into this hobby at 18 years old, a nicely restored, tour ready, brass Model T could be purchased for about 5,000.00, nicely restored Model A roadsters were bringing about the same, larger 40-50HP brass cars were well under 50,000.00 and I witnessed a Model J Duesenberg sell for a record price of 100,000.00. People told me when I was a kid that no one would want these prewar cars in a few years. And the people that always cried doom and gloom were the grumpy old men. As I got older, I learned these grumpy old men were the super cheapskates that would never pay a fair price for anything that was good. They never supported or promoted the hobby. They were always lamenting the market because they had a garage full of junk that no one wanted because it was junk when they bought it and it was still junk after sitting for decades. Well, nothing has changed. The cheapskates are still complaining and predicting doom and gloom for everyone. They are still unhappy and still have a garage full of useless junk. They never get out and enjoy their cars because none of their cars run and they are too cheap to fix them properly. Instead of having one or two good, usable cars, they bought lots of unusable junk. They started with junk and ended with junk. Their kids will never be interested in cars because the only thing they ever saw was a garage packed with useless junk that they were forced to clean out upon their father's death and quickly learned that no one wants the crap. Newer people are always getting into this hobby. I just returned from the famous SoCal HCCA Holiday Motor Excursion in California now in its 60th year. I began attending this great one day event as a kid and still try to attend every few years. The event is limited to 1932 and earlier cars. The parking lot where the event begins was jammed to near overflow capacity with prewar cars from a one-cylinder Thomas to Pope Hartfords to Silver Ghosts. There were tons to Model Ts and As as well a big Full Classics from Packards to J Duesenberg. I would think there were 100-150 cars present. All ready to tour and enjoy the day. And, you know what, there were a lot of young people driving these cars and even more as passengers and spectators. The parking and all of the tour stops were absolutely packed with spectators of all ages. Every time a hood was opened or a car was cranked, swarms of fascinated people would gather. People will always be fascinated by things that are vintage and as time and money allow, they will join the hobby. As a dealer, I can tell you the market is strong for prewar cars that are of good quality and realistically priced. I sell every brass Model T and Model A I get in even before I get a chance to advertise them. Brass cars and Full Classics at all price points are always in demand and continue to have a strong following. Even the nickel era cars sell if they are good cars and priced accordingly. The people that still complain about no one wanting these cars are still the same old cheap skates, just a different generation of cheap skates. They are too cheap to fix their cars, they are too cheap to join clubs or attend national tours and meets. They'll die and their tombstones will say "look at me, I'm a dead, grumpy old man and I spent my life complaining and predicting gloom and saving every last penny so my kids can waste it." These people have never been happy about anything in their lives. They did nothing to make the car hobby appealing. If you want to promote this hobby, get out and enjoy your cars. The best promotion this hobby can receive is when people see these great pieces of history driving down the roads. Take the time to explain your car to the crowds that gather around it when you stop for coffee. Put a young family inside your car and drive them around the block. Carry some back issues of your club's magazines with you and give them to admirers. Tell them about the next local car show or tour that will be going on in your city. If you don't get out and do this, you only have yourself to blame. If you keep saying the hobby is doomed, well, then you only have yourself to blame. I think I am going to drive a cold Model T to lunch today.
  10. 15 points
    JUST REALIZED A MILESTONE - MY 4,000TH POST ON OUR FORUM. Ten Days short of Ten Years Since Joining, and averaging just over one post per day since that time, This is an appropriate time to take note, and for me to thank the many, many individuals who make our FORUM the exceptional interchange of information, expertise, experience, humor, and sharing. My vehicles show the benefit of your comments, as does my life. I've had the benefit of meeting many of you in person during our travels, on Tour, while Judging at our Meets, or just on vacation. Regrettably, I'll never have the experience of meeting most of you. We come together from many different walks of life, differing life and work experience, are geographically dispersed, chronologically varied in age from teens to nineties and possibly beyond, perhaps favor many differing types of vehicles, yet all contribute to the overall community, each in a special way. Some of us collect, or restore, or maintain, some broker or flip, and others may simply observe! - some prefer the technical aspects and others maybe not? - some restore simply for the end result, others are dedicated to the competitive aspects of Show/Meet/ Concourse, and still others are dedicated to literature or to the Tour/Driving portion of our lifestyle. The choice of era - Brass, Nickel, Glidden, Chrome, Tuner, etc - Four-wheeling, or Two (or three?)- gas, diesel, electric, hybrid- all of the above? ... but our dissimilarities make us all the more similar and comparable - and hopefully the collector vehicle community is better for that ! I simply want to thank all of you who make our FORUM the pleasant, safe, informative, educational, fun and enjoyable place it has become, and with proper guidance, will continue to be. With best regards to all with our wish for health and happiness for the holiday season and the new year, Marty
  11. 15 points
    These photos or similar ones have appeared elsewhere on this forum but they fit here,too. The 1925 Standard Six Four Passenger Coupe was restored in the '70's and sat for 37 years.I bought it in July 2017 and just got it all sorted out in time to put it away again for the winter. The 1929 McLaughlin-Buick Master Close-coupled sedan underwent a ten year year restoration from cow scratching post to show winner.I bought it several years ago.
  12. 15 points
    The colors haven't really arrived here in SW Ontario but will a corn field do ? I posted these on Me and MY Buick but they fit here too.The '25 is just getting it's legs back after a 37 year slumber. Jim
  13. 15 points
  14. 15 points
    Took the 56 on the After Tour for our Regional Meet. About 90 miles preplanned, add a few for when I got everyone lost in the hills of Rennselear, NY.
  15. 14 points
  16. 14 points
    Must have been one helluva party y’all keep warm now
  17. 14 points
    Springfield Motors Buick dealership, Springfield, Oregon My wife and I were returning home from a road trip to some of the great national parks in the California Sierra Nevada range. Last Saturday morning, we crossed Willamette Pass Highway over the Oregon Cascades, and planned for lunch in the Eugene area. I spotted the sign to the Historic Downtown District of neighboring Springfield, and remembered that there was an old Buick dealership in the area. Following lunch at the The Plank, we drove a couple of blocks to the dealership, constructed in 1949 for Clarence Scherer. The dealership design incorporated features from the 1944 Buick Building Layout Guide, and the structure remains much the same 68 years later. While not as grand as some of the mid-century dealerships built in larger cities, the building has been meticulously maintained, and was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2011. Springfield Motors is one of only about thirty remaining stand-alone Buick dealerships in the USA, and carries a large inventory of new Buicks. This was surprising, in view of the West Coast dominance by Asian and German automotive brands. The salesman with whom we talked, Victor, has been an employee since 1984, and conveys enthusiasm for Buick and the dealership's history. The dealership remains in the Scherer family, operated by Clarence's son. A glimpse into the service area revealed a superb, original 1966 Skylark GS convertible, traded in by one of Clarence's customers in 1967, and preserved ever since. I noticed right away the rarely seen 1966 GM headrest option! My accompanying photos show some of the enlarged photos from the showroom walls, including an image of the 1949 Roadmaster convertible that graced the showroom floor when the dealership was opened. I was particularly interested in the image of a 1949 Buick sedanette and a 1959 Buick Electra, photographed when the dealership was ten years old. A glass display case is filled with Buick brochures and promotional model cars from the 1950's and early 1960's. Clarence's father, Otto, opened a Buick dealership in Palmyra, Wisconsin in 1910, and some of the showroom images are historic photos of the early Buick dealership. Victor eagerly pointed out the large photos of Louis Chevrolet and the early Buick Racing Team. All of this was tremendously exciting, and I offered an early suggestion regarding a celebration of the dealership's 70th anniversary in 2019. What a great opportunity to gather vintage Buicks from around the Pacific Northwest to recognize this dealership's long-term dedication to Buick. I can only hope that the folks at General Motors who have been entrusted with the Buick brand can be as passionate about Buick as the folks at Springfield Motors.
  18. 14 points
    Fall is winding down here, and it actually snowed a little bit yesterday. It's certainly been cold! But today was another bright, crisp, sunny day and had a chance to get the 56 out for a breakfast run. After reading the positive review on this place on Sunday, Ed and I decided to meet here: When I pulled in I thought I was lucky to get this spot in front for a picture. But then I realized the place was closed on Tuesdays. Just my luck! So when Ed arrived we cruised over to another spot in town and got a nice parking spot right in front anyway. It was great to get the car out !
  19. 14 points
    As some of you know I had been accepted to the Concours in Boca and Pinehurst failing to make it to either due to various mechanical issues attempting to drive to each event. If not here are links to those to threads. So for the Hilton Head Concours D'Eelegance I broke down (instead of the Buick) and borrowed a truck and trailer from a local Carolina Chapter BCA Member, Paul Haddock, and trailered the Buick to the show. Here are some photos from the event. A big thank you to Paul for letting me borrow his rig! My detailer getting the car ready for the show A few of the cars in my class. The red '37 Imperial won Best in Class Carol Hughes's 54 Buick took a Palmetto Award in Class, Beautiful car with Factory AC Here are some of my favorite non-Buick's of the show After lunch I came back to find this hanging from my rear view mirror Driving on to the awards field Let me take a selfie! Back in my spot Headed home!!
  20. 14 points
    Is that a 92 Buick Century?
  21. 14 points
    John, your Buicks are so photogenic! I finally have one to contribute:
  22. 14 points
    My wife and I took the '53 to the local antique festival, and I played around with the editing software when I got back.
  23. 14 points
    Always parked next to something fully restored. But she's front and center. The other buicks here:
  24. 13 points
    After posting various photos in the "Favorite Pictures of My Pre War Buick" thread, I decided it was time to start my own thread. I got this car in March of 2017, and I know very little about its history. It appears to be an older restoration of a solid original car. I will start out with some photos (some of which have already been posted in the other thread).
  25. 13 points