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  1. 20 points
    Having attended the 2017 Annual Membership Meeting in Philadelphia this past weekend, I want to share an image that I think exemplifies the character of the man we are fortunate enough to have as our 2017 National President. It may not look like much - in fact, it doesn't even look like he is doing anything connected with AACA, discussing a lapful of vintage vinyl records with a young man obviously too young to own an antique car. What makes this image special to me is that is was taken right after the afternoon round table where Tom, along with the entire AACA National Board and staff, endured public insult and condemnation by individuals who later admitted they were ignorant of the facts concerning what they were complaining about. Tom not only responded to uncalled for and inappropriate comments with intelligence and courtesy, he explained a complex situation in a manner that was not offensive, disrespectful, or adversarial to anyone. It was a very stressful and unpleasant way to spend what should have been a time to honor and express much-deserved appreciation to our outgoing and incoming National Presidents and officers. Immediately after this meeting, Tom was approached by a young AACA member who wanted to share his latest interest - vinyl records. Most people would have still been reeling from the turmoil, but Tom not only acknowledged the young man; he sat down and talked to him at length over this new passion. A lot of AACA members talk about inspiring and encouraging future generations - Tom Cox leads by example.
  2. 19 points
    I have noticed that my "reputation" points clicked up a couple points. I have 691 posts here on the forum but only 73 "reputation" points. Another member, who has been here as long as I have and has ten less posts, has almost 500 reputation points. How come I have such a bad reputation on this forum? I have never had a tussle with anybody on the forum and I try and offer the correct information if I have it. How does the "reputation" point system work?
  3. 18 points
    Took a lot of these pictures over a year ago but just finding a rainy day to post them. This room use to be my son Jordan's room before and while he was in college. Then it became a "spare bedroom" but began collecting a lot of "pitch it in the door" junk. I finally decided to take it over for my office. After cleaning it of all the junk and repairing some of the mysterious holes in the sheet rock that had been hidden for years with Johnny Cash and Marine Corp posters (at least he had good taste in posters), Rita and Terry commenced to painting the walls in 1954 Buick colors of Tunis Blue and Malibu Blue. Note also the cabinets and tables are "Buick Engine Green" which I think goes great with the '54 Buick blue colors. Thanks for looking and hope you enjoy. "1954 BUICK HEADQUARTERS" That's sort of panoramic look. I can post some close ups and detail shots if any interest.
  4. 18 points
    I received my Buick Bugle in the mail a few days ago now an excellent publication all round per usual. I would draw your attention to the "Barn Find" article by our own Lamar Brown (aka Mr. Earl). An excellent story with great pictures. The outcome of the quick turnaround on the cars was amazing. The crown jewel of course being the pre-war sedan which I know will be well taken care of by one of, if not the newest member of the pre-war forum under the Buick heading. So now we can add to his already impressive resume the title "pre-war correspondent". KUDOS to you Lamar for saving these fine Buicks, finding them good homes and writing a great article about the whole adventure. Oh and thank you to your understanding missus as well.
  5. 18 points
    and it will never be the same. Good ol' Dandy Dave paid us an overnight visit and fun was had by all. His visit could not have come at a better time as I was making my last haul of parts from the barn find purchase. So I guess you could call it a working vacation. But it sure made the task of loading and unloading engines and transmissions and doors and fenders much more fun not to mention easier on this old mans back. Plus I think he has unloaded a few engines in his lifetime. No pictures of us working but here are a few of the good times. This guy is a hoot and has a lot of knowledge stored in that head of his. Rita and I enjoyed his stay immensely. Oh and the Cap'n was there also. Sweet Reet and Dandy Dave "just a swingin" out by Buick Pond This guy is the first visitor ever to Buick Gardens to know what these two things were. Anybody else know? We're saying "Cheers" to all the BCA Forum members here. "CHEERS" . And I think this is when I exclaimed "It ain't heaven, but it'll do til we get there" Rita just kept sayin "this guy is funny" "this guy is a genius" "I love this guy" !!!! WATCH THE UPHOLSTERY SON, watch the upholstery!!!!! Elvis like him too, but I didn't get any shots of him with DD. Maybe Dave did. Dave explained to me the difference between a Yankee and a Damn Yankee... a "yankee" is sombody from up nawth. A "damn yankee" is somebody from up nawth who stays. Thanks for the good times and help Dave, have a good flight back to New Yawk.
  6. 17 points
    Okay, so maybe not so good looking Buick right now, but it's about time I stop flooding "Post War" with topics and start my own Me and My Buick thread. A little bit of history: The car was purchased brand new as one of two, by my grandfather, from the Kessler dealership in Detroit, in 1956. A few weeks prior, at some point whether returning or going to the army base, my grandfather rolled his 1953 Buick Roadmaster off an embankment and came out with nothing but his life. He needed new transportation, and with the aid of his then girlfriend at the time, placed an order for one Buick Century with all the bells and whistles save AC, power windows and power seats. I'm told that my grandmother rolled the car off the assembly line, but it seems all flair considering assembly line cars had a special stamp on the firewall ID tag. Before leaving service, he purchased for his mother a sister Century (Red and Black) that had every accessory option available. The two of them then set out west, back to Seattle, where the Red and Black Century was gifted to my great grandmother, and the Blue and White Century started a family in 1958. Fast forward to 1978, the last year licensed. My grandfather is driving around a 1971 Estate Wagon 455, while his oldest son and daughter (my mother) are bombing around in the 56 Century. A good 20+ years of pampered service got my uncle through 2 years of community college (I got free parking when I went because it still has, to this day, the Green River Community College parking pass on it). One fateful afternoon, sometime after three teeth broke off the reverse ring gear in the Dynaflow, the front pump became plugged up on a rather large upward climb. My grandfather, raising a family of 5, had fallen on hard times and the car sat in a lofty car port from that day on. Fast forward to the mid 80s, where my grandfather's youngest son was in auto tech class in highschool. With good intentions, but misguidance, tore the still running 322 apart. Upon inspection, worn rocker arms were found and a few broken valve springs, among other common wear parts for a 200,000 mile car. The heads, timing cover, sprockets, chain, lifters, rocker arms and valve covers were stored in the trunk/front/back seat, the intake and Rochester 4GC left down in the basement, and the bock left bare with pistons and all to the elements, shielded only by the roof over it's head and the lofty hood. The car quickly became a pipe dream and was left in shambles. In 2010, my grandmother passed away and was the first time I can remember the whole family being in one place. My uncle (oldest son) moved to Oklahoma, and my aunt (youngest daughter) moved to Colorado. It was an unfortunate time, and while on her death bed, the car had come up in front of my grandmother several times. After she died, the house was quickly deserted and the question of who got the car was left unanswered. No one wanted it because it had zero value and was too much work. At some point around this time, and being close to graduation, I had shown interest in the car. It was my favorite since I first found it 13 or so years prior (then 18 at the time of 2010), and I had started doing a lot of research. My mother had threatened to scrap it several times during this point to clean up and sell the house, and I had pooled every thing I could save between going to the college part time and barely making enough money to pay for the classes. My saving grace was my first few tax returns, and I had saved up enough money to have the engine sent out for rebuild in 2013. Another year passes and the next tax return was used to cover the transmission. In 2015, I had amassed enough parts to finally fire the old beast off, and she awoke with the fire of a thousand suns. Her slumber was over, and it was the first time I had witnessed my grandfather cry after the passing of my grandmother. The herd came flocking, everyone suddenly wanted the car, and we got in notarized writing that the car had been gifted to me and was put in my name after a state patrol inspection October of 2015. Lady Century's legacy was reborn. Of course, most of you all are up to date with what the car has gone through, in fact, we've both gone through a lot. The 322 powerplant is now out of a 1956 Buick Roadmaster, salvaged from an LS swap after my original engine had torn itself apart on the grounds of poor workmanship. The rear end, as I found out from my grandfather, didn't have the correct pinion pre-load, which allowed the pinion to hammer the carrier and prompted me to find a rear end from a Special. The power steering box and pump, after being rebuilt, are still sloppy and the pump itself was put together wrong, which resulted in the pulley tearing apart the end shaft - also a junkyard journey. My starter flew itself apart, and eventually so did the generator to an extent, which prompted me to find a junkyard replacement for the former and a re-manufactured replacement for a 1956 Chevy for the latter. I have also upgraded the brakes on the front to Roadmaster brakes and repaired the master cylinder myself. The suspension from front to back, save the front coil springs, A-arm bushings and king pins, have been replaced completely. I also replaced the original Rochester 4GC with a Carter WCFB. I even rebuilt the power antenna, rebuilt the tube radio, and repaired the clock, blower motor and cigarette lighter. This car is fully functional front to back, with front and rear speakers and all the fixings of a 1956 luxury sports car. All that's left to do now is paint, glass, chrome and interior - the hard stuff. This car will be following me on my exodus over Snoqualmie pass, where I will spend the next two years at Washington State University, fulfilling my degree in Mechanical Engineering. This thread will be the continuation of my experiences with my Buick as I journey forward. I hope you guys enjoy the ride!
  7. 16 points
    It all started with an email from an old friend and Dixie Chapter member Bruce Kile advising that he and a friend were going to look at some old Buick's in a warehouse and because there was a 54 involved thought I might be interested in joining them. I of course said sure and made plans to meet up with them at the warehouse in Toccoa Georgia. Toccoa is a small town in NE Georgia located about 50 miles from me and I have always known it to have lots of old Buick's in it. We met at the warehouse and was met by a super nice gentleman named Ray who told us the story behind all the Buicks we were about to see. The Buick's had belonged to the owner of Tugalo Gas Company who had passed away about 25 years ago. We met his son Tom, who is the current owner and learned that Ray was the Vice President of the company. We spent probably about 3 hours looking over the cars and I of course spent half of that looking at the '54 which was a solid 4 door Century with near perfect glass, original seat upholstery under old seat covers and had had a respray. The rest of the cars consisted of: 1938 Special Model 44, 2 door Streamline Sport Sedan 1940 Super Model 51 Four-Door Touring Sedan 1953 Special 4 door 1953 Super 4 door 1962 Electra 225 4 door 4 window 1963 Special 4 door 1963 LeSaber 4 door After looking over the cars we had a late lunch at M&J's Home Cooking Restaurant, a buffet style restaurant there in town. We discussed the cars and the fact that the owner was looking for offers and as the cars had been collected by his father, he wanted to ensure they went to good homes. Bruce and his friend were quite amazed at what we had seen but had no real interest in purchasing anything . I on the other hand, upon arriving home talked it over with Rita and we decided I should at least make an offer on the little 54 Century. The next day I called Ray and he informed me he had had calls from two individuals very interested in the cars and especially the '38. I made him an offer on the '54 and he said he guessed he could do it, but would I possibly be interested in the whole lot and quoted a figure that I had to ask him to repeat to ensure I had heard correctly. Considering the very fair figure that he had thrown at me and the fact I knew he had others interested in the cars, I quickly answered that I would take them. All the time realizing this was a bit more than Rita and I had discussed and immediately began wondering how the hell was I going to break this news to her. The following Monday I began hauling the Buicks home to Buick Gardens. But not before calling and suggesting to Ken Green here on the forum that he bring his trailer and if he liked the 40 Super he could take it home with him and if not he could deliver it to my house. We had lunch at M&J's Buffet, talked over the deal and as already learned from his new thread, he took it home with him. Luckily I am still married and over the last week have made a number of trips through the beautiful winding roads of the Northeast Georgia countryside hauling these wonderful old Buicks home. Ken graciously agreed to help haul the two big girls, the LeSabre and the Electra 225. It appears I have not only gained seven more Buicks this week but also some new friends. Ray and Tom were two of the nicest people you would ever hope to meet and plan to keep in touch in letting them know where the Buicks find homes. Ken is in Atlanta and I am sure we will be getting together to turn some wrenches or pound on some metal. Life in Buickland is good. From the first day we visited. Lets start with the oldest first.... the 38 and 40. The 38 was restored back in the early 80's and driven, gorgeous interior. The 40 was being worked on when the owner died, leaving the interior to be finished. more, much more to come..........
  8. 16 points
    While I'm often frustrated by the lack of precision in the hobby's language ("restored" does not mean a brand new small block Chevy engine in your Ford roadster), I think the meaning of "NOS" or "New Old Stock" is such that everyone in the hobby knows what it means. It is not a term that is abused like "restored," "classic," or "original,", but rather one that can potentially be naively mis-interpreted as the OP suggests. However, unless you're a total rookie, I don't think you'll be swindled by someone using that term to describe a part that was made in-period and never installed or used on a car. Everyone pretty much agrees on the definition of NOS. Nobody's buying an NOS fender for their 1940 Buick thinking that GM just stamped it last week because of the word "new" in its description. Now the condition of NOS parts is something else, but that's probably not something that can be remedied by changing the terminology we use to describe vintage parts that have not been used. I wouldn't use an NOS carburetor kit, but I understand perfectly that it is a carburetor kit that was made in-period and never used. There is exactly zero confusion over what it is when it is described as "NOS." It is still technically new and unused, but it was made a long time ago. No confusion, especially not with the weight of decades of proper use behind the term. I think this particular issue is a solution in search of a problem.
  9. 15 points
    Thank you so much for those kind words Mark (and to the twelve folks who "liked" what he had to say ) This was truly one of the greatest events of my life. It all happened so quickly. I am glad that I wrote the article as it will serve for many years as a reminder of a time I don't ever want to forget. I really enjoyed writing the story and working with Cindy in laying out the text and pictures. It was not easy compressing into 5 pages all that happened between that first email from Bruce Kile and the last car leaving Buick Gardens. I had taken so many great pictures and I had so much I wanted to tell about. Cindy is so easy and fun to work with and knows what the readers want to see. I also want to thank Pete for giving me that many pages to tell the story. But the real heroes of this story are Ed Gilmer (the original owner of all the Buicks) and his son Tom. Ed had to be one hell of a Buickman in his day and truly loved his Buicks. And Tom has to be one of the most generous persons I have ever known and I tried to pass on that generosity to those who I sold the cars to. His right hand man Ray was also just a fine southern gentleman and a great help in having some of the staff of Tugalo Gas help in prepping the cars for loading and such. Regarding the "crown jewel pre-war sedan", regrettably Miss Tugalo Gas has taken her place in line behind a couple of '54s that are awaiting repairs/reassembly but fear not, she does not get lonesome. I and sometimes Rita and I just go and sit in her and marvel at that long beautiful hood up front and that back seat that you could practically dance in and wonder about the times and people she has known. I am gathering a few parts for when I do get around to her though, in fact Bruce already found me a battery bracket at the swap meet at the Nationals. I am really liking this guy Bruce these days. And yes Mark, I am so thankful to have such a trusting and understanding wife as my sweet Reet, they don't come any better ( or any prettier). Again thanks for the KUDOS Mark, I sincerely appreciate it.
  10. 15 points
    Since a couple of people have asked... A regular reader of his car restoration discussion noticed signs of medical issues. Frank had posted some photos that included his address. The reader reported his concerns about the recent erratic posts and suspected worsening medical issues. I was able to do a Google search for the local law enforcement agency in Frank's location and obtained their phone number. I called the law enforcement agency, reported the concerns and asked them to check on his medical condition based on those facts. They responded to his home and, after investigating summoned an ambulance to transport him for treatment. The world is a smaller place than it used to be. We can all look out for each other even if we are in distant locations.
  11. 15 points
    5:30 this morning at work. This morning was quite warmer than yesterdays 42degrees. Was a balming 56!
  12. 15 points
    And then it was time to go back after the '53 Special and the '54 Century. My good friend Brad (Brad54 here on the forum some time back) met me there and we loaded these two up. I was beginning to gain a real respect for Mr Gilmer's selection of these old Buicks back in the late 70's to mid 80's as each one of them had a couple of things in common. They were all solid and had as best I could tell No Rust. They were all from the North East Georgia/Toccoa area and most had been purchased right there in Toccoa from Tabor Buick Company. Most were purchased from families and friends including mostly little old ladies.
  13. 15 points
    Saturday was my grandmother's birthday, so I took the car out to visit her. She supposedly drove it off the assembly line in Flint, Michigan. The car was ordered from the Kessler dealership in Detroit, and she went to go pick it up while my grandpa as on base. The odd thing is that it came with aftermarket mirrors, which I suppose were an afterthought by my grandfather. They later took the car and drove out west where they settled in 1958 and started their family. This is the first time I've driven the car out. Never thought about it before until now, so I made sure to thank her for not getting rid of it after all those years.
  14. 15 points
  15. 15 points
    My '57 Model 73 Roadmaster Riviera Sedan, a driver, at the Caroilnas Aviation Museum with a Piedmont Airlines DC-3.
  16. 14 points
    I picked up my new 1960 Buick Electra today. They Dynaflow is a curiously cool transmission. Just keeps pulling. The previous owner kept records and receipts. Had the Dynaflow serviced quite a bit. I'm guessing this is what keeps it working as design.
  17. 14 points
    My wife and I took the '53 to the local antique festival, and I played around with the editing software when I got back.
  18. 14 points
    Always parked next to something fully restored. But she's front and center. The other buicks here:
  19. 14 points
    Flew into OKC about 9 pm on the 14th. Got to my storage unit late, past the 9 pm cut off line, to find the gate closed for the night. I jumped over the gate smiling at the camera and went straight to my unit. I rolled up the door and there she was. Last time she run was July 16th, and forgot to disconnect the battery before I left... She started right up, I pulled up to the gate, punched in my code and gate opened up for us. Stopped at the nearest Wally, got some coffee, food and a sleeping bag and I slept for two hrs. I hit the road at 1 am. Destination Boise, ID. My compression numbers back in June came low, 125 psi all across. Dry. The 4 qts of oil, in 1600 miles agree with the low numbers. Odometer shows now 170K miles. Dry as a bone. No engine noises, quiet lifters, white smoke at start up from the exhaust. The oil thing was a surprise to me, but I am glad I had bought a 5 gal 20W50 as a spare that night... She drove beautiful, we respected each other and got me home safe. Highest elevation I saw was 8900 ft. Got caught in a couple of huge rain storms, nothing but rain for 2 hrs, she did great. AM radio all the way. 91RON, nothing but a smooth ride start to finish. Beautiful country, risky trip, but it paid off at the end. Transport guys wanted $1000 to haul it. This was my third trip up to Boise this month. Tired, but both girls are home with me now.
  20. 14 points
    After 6 years on the forum I finally get to post here, and while today is Monday, being labor day and I'm off work, I'm taking the liberty of calling it the weekend! Thanks to everyone who helped me along the way.... one 15 mile round trip down and hopefully many more to go!
  21. 14 points
    Two unsung heros who keep the national meet on track, straightened out, and running smoothly: Roy and Michelle Faries spent nearly the entire meet in this room behind this computer equipment, making changes, responding to complaints, keeping score, printing out forms, and keeping track of all of the judging results. From the bottom of my heart, thanks to both of you. Pete Phillips 2017 Meet Head Judge
  22. 14 points
    Took the 56 fourty miles tonight for the Wednesday Cruise in. This gave me a chance to run her at highway speeds for several miles. I have been a fool for not changing that PS pump years ago! What a difference!
  23. 14 points
    This weekend was my college orientation. I wish we had gotten more photos, given it was a 5 and a half hour drive to the campus from where I live, over the mountain pass and through the Eastern Washington plains. My buddy is the photographer. Everyone told us not to take the Buick. I was determined to take it with me and prove to them that it is as reliable as any other car I've ever driven. So this is the point of no return. The on-ramp to the pass. We got in around 8 PM but the offered spaces for transfer students was already booked, so luckily there was a really cheap motel 5 minutes from campus. I parked her under the neon sign. The old girl worked hard that day. Here she is parked on campus. I wish there was more college flair, but I suppose you can spot the WSU Cougar in the background there... And the same day with us getting ready to go back to the motel... Funny story here. My gas gauge only ever went to half full, despite being filled up. Yet in the photo, it's at Full. The roads in and out of the campus were so beaten by all the agricultural shipping trucks that they must have jarred something in the gas gauge and it started working properly... I couldn't believe it! What I learned on this trip? My electric wiper kit arrived after I left, so it reinforced the idea of getting rid of the vacuum wipers - especially if I plan to make the trip to and from school a couple times a year. There isn't a NAPA on campus, rather an old mom and pop store that is no better than a cheap Autozone (which is unfortunate) - however, there is a NAPA 15 minutes from campus in the nearby town and they are all very nice a knowledgeable folks. They came out and the first thing out of their mouths was 322 Nailhead. A PCV system is better than no PCV system. On the way in I had it hooked up and we averaged 18 MPG. On the way out I took it off and swapped breather caps and at best got 14 MPG. Also if the engine wasn't broken in before, it sure got a run for it's money when I pushed 90 MPH at 4000 RPM in our voyage home convoy.
  24. 14 points
    Riv: I get it. I wanted to leave the dust on the car as long as possible. I did wash the car tonight and that was a lot of time earned dust flowing down the drive. The car interior needs to be cleaned out so that I can reassemble parts that were removed. The interior door panels were removed and placed in the rear seat and the drivers window, vent window and vent deflector have been removed from the drivers door and are not with the car. There is also a piece of trim around the exterior of the drivers window that hasn't been found. Once cleaned, it will be easier to crawl around it to access parts that need attention. Plus it is pretty gross sitting in the car right now with all the dust.
  25. 14 points
    Ok, for all of you tough guys. Let's go for a ride. It is 15deg F outside and snowing. And the truck started and ran after sitting outside overnight.