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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/10/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    An original car is what I really like. I know a fellow that has show quality cars, a Rolls, Bentley, Buick all in the late 20’s and a Cord. He saw the Studebaker and asked me how often I drove it. The answer was every chance I can, I’ve put about 4500 miles on it in the last two years or so. I asked how many miles he had but on his and his answer was less than 10 miles each in the 10+ years he owned them. Then he said he wished he had a driver like mine. What a shame to just keep them in a garage or only on a show field. I don’t think mine would ever be allowed to on a show field even in a survivor class from what I’ve seen called a survivor. The judges would probably have a heart attack or die laughing. That’s ( the laughs not the heart attack ) perfectly ok with me. I’m 71 the beast is 80 (made Aug 27 1937) and I’m sure it is going to out last me so I’m going to drive it, enjoy it and not give a damn if anyone else thinks that’s wrong because it’s mine not theirs. Have fun. Dave S
  2. 5 points
    OK. First snow in Goodrich (near Flint) today. Time to get the winter Buick out!
  3. 5 points
    Thanks Marty! Appreciate the like. This was taken "a few years ago" in Port Huron, Michigan almost under the Blue Water Bridge spanning the St Clair River with her recent finished twin bridge looking north out into Lake Huron. While I'm from Windsor, Ontario, Canada this particular day I crossed into Michigan over the Ambassador Bridge at Detroit with two other friends following north along the Detroit River, drove along Lake St. Clair, along the St. Clair River, spent the afternoon at a Classic Boat Show hold on the Black River and just had to take pictures at the mouth of the St. Clair River. Under normal highway driving (on I-94) it is about an 1 hour and 15 minute drive but... along the route I described we enjoyed the unobstructed views taking our time and made a FULL day of it returning home via the same route. On the way home we stopped at Port Huron's Tourist Information restored / re-purposed gas station. 'Twas a great day!
  4. 4 points
    Back seat is done. Front cushion sewed. Extra dense foam later added to the front seat. Bench is solid - no broken springs and negligible rust. Backrest and trunk to go. Touched up the red paint on the seat mount. Picture below is shot of the nuts that hold the clips on for the stainless trim around the edge of the seat. Never could get that off to polish. No time in the schedule to do it - will have to do it on car later
  5. 3 points
    Kyle: From your photo it looks to be a 1926-27 shell with the lacing held on by rivets instead of lacing through the slots as Hugh has shown. Point of reference ... If your car had an accident say in 1930 and you went to your Buick dealer for a replacement factory shell he would have sold you a shell for a 1926 or 1927 as 1925-1925 style was no longer available. I have seen many 1924 and 1925 Master and Standard Buicks with later style shells. Fitment of the radiator shroud to the newer shell can be problematic since some of the mounting holes do not quite line up. My 1925 Master has the correct shell but has scabby brazed patches on the bottom and was painted black. Also the top was misshapen when they tried to install the reworked radiator core. I picked up a complete 1924 6 cyl radiator that is not as badly rusted on the bottom but someone cut out some of the lacing flange. So even to put that shell into plate-able shape it would require extensive welding. Larry
  6. 3 points
    Come on guys.... not that big of a deal.
  7. 3 points
    just got back my chrome and moldings from el paso plating, interior trim painted, thinking about two tone brown for the seats
  8. 2 points
    Hello all my friends of AACA: I wish you and yours families Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2018. Regards from Spain.
  9. 2 points
    Merry Christmas from Texas. We just had snow for the first time in over 30 years.
  10. 2 points
    If only I were a younger man ( and higher Aussie $ ) and didn't have the asbestos storm troopers to deal with.
  11. 2 points
    Retained embers still glowing through the depression years?
  12. 2 points
    Well, after a five hour wait for a Locksmith I'm back running again. Seems Ford had a problem with the Focus ignition switches up till 2008 somewhat like I was having. The tumblers would get stuck or out of alignment not allowing the key to turn. He sprayed a little bit of WD40 in the switch, sat in the seat and centered the steering wheel. There is a little bit of play even when locked. He then put the key in and with a screw driver tapped the key lightly while trying to turn the key with the other hand. Suddenly it turned and he started the truck. He shut if off and on several times and it only offered to stick the second time. Turns out he lives almost behind me and.... I went to High School with his older brother! Said not to worry about the service call as he was headed home anyway but gave him something anyway. Who knows when I might need his services again!? Phew!
  13. 2 points
    I drove one once and it rode like a lumber wagon. Comfortable seating and under powered, but a stiff ride.
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Nice job Jim! I always think it's unusual when people add turn signals to their 30's era cars and choose to use cheap looking, brightly colored amber lenses that just scream Pep Boys. It makes me wonder why they didn't choose to do exactly what you did. There is no shortage of period correct light housings with clear lenses that would be perfect for this job, as you've shown. Again, very nice!
  16. 2 points
    Heavens to Murgatroid, you certainly called this one right! I have owned almost 50 Corvettes and used to be a moderator on the largest forum covering them. They can be a pack of wolves! Devouring their own is a favorite past time.
  17. 2 points
    Saw this in San Diego a few weeks ago....
  18. 2 points
    Here's a few more photos. The car was owned by an older couple and always garaged. When neither could drive any longer the car was donated to help Veterans. Pearl would be a fitting name for more reason than one Mr. Earl. And besides, Miss Patty's lucky number 69 is the mileage. She won a lottery with that number in the mix once. Her deceased husband was also a Vietnam Vet and served in the Seabees. He was wounded in action while serving. Almost like it was meant to be. Dandy Dave!
  19. 2 points
    Look at the second picture from Old Cars Weekly for the December 14, 2017 issue.
  20. 1 point
    Merry Christmas from sunny Palm Springs, California!
  21. 1 point
    Thank you all for your kind words. I hope you guys will help me make this forum a more enjoyable place for discussions and sharing of technical information about the Buick Reatta. No matter if you're interested in collecting, maintaining or modifying your Reatta, your posts are welcomed. Need help with repairs? Those posts are welcomed too. Stop lurking in the background and start posting. Let's have some fun!! If you have any problems with the forum or suggestions to make it better please send me a PM. I'm here to help.
  22. 1 point
    The only other type of Nickel plating that I have ever heard of is Hard Nickel Plating. Anyone know anything about that? Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  23. 1 point
    As far as I understand, the WCFB grew shorter each year to allow for a lower and lowerhood. You will want to be sure of air cleaner fittment and hood clearance.
  24. 1 point
    If the Buick in the OP had been STONE STOCK, just how long would it take for an AACA "expert" to point out every flaw they could find and point it out to the owner. That attitude drives far more people out of the "restored' club and into the modified fraternity so they can drive them part of the hobby. Bob
  25. 1 point